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Addition to 13 (two pages ago)

If you can, honk your horn before you turn it on.

I once acutally had to pop my hood because a cat (chased by my dog) went into the engine from underneath and when I popped the hood, was sitting on top of the engine. Figure that one out, lol. I wouldn't have even seen her if I hadn't seen the dog chase her into my truck.
Honking the horn will usually scare what ever is in your vehicle that you cant see, out of it.
You can also just thunk your hood with your hand a couple times; if you have neighbors, they will appreciate not hearing a car horn every morning :)
Also do this for riding lawn mowers and any other motor vehicle (like a ATV) that has an enclosed engine.
 

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Also keep animals away from lawn mowers (and I suppose other like vehicles, ATVs etc.) after they have been run for awhile. As engines and other parts get warm and what not.

We recently had a kitten that was playing with the others around the lawnmower when it was freshly parked in the garage and the kitten burnt a good sized patch on his back. He is ok, the hair is growing back, but it scabbed up for awhile and it wasn't pleasant for him.
 

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Just thought I'd mention something here. I dont know how it is in all of your home's, but my family cannot seem to get their dental floss, Q-tips and cotton balls into the trash can. They either leave them on the counter, where the cat knocks them on the floor, or they toss them in the general direction of the trash can. So, if your family doesnt understand how to operate a trash can, like mine, pick this stuff up so the dogs dont eat it.
 

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Summer is the season most of us look forward to for outdoor activities, but dogs don't do as well in hot weather as people do. Sometimes it's kinder, and far safer, to keep your dog at home. But whatever you do and wherever you go, keep these tips in mind:

Be aware that not all dogs handle heat in the same way. Dogs build up heat as a function of volume and lose it as a function of surface area. This means that larger dogs with rounder bodies have less surface area for their size, and build up heat faster.

In addition, dogs lose heat through evaporation from their nasal passages and tongue. This means that dogs with flat faces are less able to lose heat. As a rule, the bigger the dog and the flatter the face, the more prone they are to overheating. Overweight and old dogs have an even greater risk, as do dogs with thick fur.

Fur coats can be hot. Fur provides some amount of protection from the sun, but thick fur prevents body heat from escaping and promotes overheating. It's a myth that shaving a dog's coat makes him hotter. Shaving it to the skin can make him vulnerable to sunburn, but cutting the fur to about one inch can help him stay cooler. If you don't want to shave him, brush as much undercoat as you can out, and be sure no solid mats are there to trap heat and moisture.

Don't exercise your dog when it's warm. He wanted to run, so you took him jogging. You only noticed he was in trouble when he started to stagger, then fell. His breathing is rapid, his gums red, and he has thick, profuse saliva. He's in full blown heat stroke, and you must act fast to save his life. See later in the article for instructions.

Unfortunately, veterinarians see far too many dogs in this situation every year, many of which succumb. Dogs overheat before people do, so even though you may be just a little warm, your dog can be lethally overheated. On warm days, exercise your dog first thing in the morning, late at night, or only where he can cool off in water. And beware of hot asphalt!

Keep your dog out of parked cars. You only meant to be gone a minute. But once in the store, you got distracted, you forgot just how hot it was outside, and by the time you came back, a crowd was around your car. This time you were lucky. A broken window, the scowls of onlookers, but your dog is alive. Next time he might not be.

Studies show that the temperature inside cars can heat to lethal temperatures within 30 minutes even if the weather outside is relatively cool. Regardless of outside air temperature, cars heat up at a similar rate - gaining 80 percent of their final temperature within 30 minutes. Cars that start at a comfortable 72 degrees F (22 degrees C), for example, soar to a deadly 117 degrees F (47 degrees C) after 60 minutes in the sun. Cracking the windows scarcely affects the temperature inside.

Nobody keeps statistics on dog deaths from being left in cars, but about 30 to 40 children die in parked cars each year. Considering that dogs aren't allowed in most places children are, and that dogs overheat more quickly than children, it's likely that hundreds of dogs die in closed cars every year.

Be prepared for travel emergencies. You're driving with your dog on a hot day, enjoying the air conditioning. Suddenly the car dies. As you wait for help, the temperature is rising, and your dog is starting to get overheated. If you have water, offer some to him, and pour some over him. Next time, prepare by bringing a cooler with ice and a small car-battery-powered fan. Soak your dog and a towel in ice water, have him sit on the towel, and aim the fan at him. Air blowing over your dog's wet skin and fur cools him just as your sweat in a breeze cools you.

Provide for comfort at home. You left your dog in the yard, but the day turned out hotter than you expected. Next time, provide for your dog's comfort before you leave. Be sure he has a place that's shady all day long. Buy a kiddy pool and fill it with water so he can soak in it and cool off. If possible, aim a fan at him from a sheltered place so he has a breeze. If your dog is left inside, you may need to run the air conditioning, or at least a fan. If the weather is very hot, you may need to find a way to guard against electrical outages while you're away. Some pets have died when the electricity, and thus air conditioning, unexpectedly went off during the day.

Spring can be just as hot. Just because it's spring (or fall) don't be lulled into a false sense of security. Many people who are aware of summer heat hazards fail to take the same precautions in spring, when their dogs may still be wearing their thick winter coats. Don't be caught off guard!

Cooling a Hot Dog. Don't plunge an overheated dog into ice water. This causes the peripheral blood vessels to contract, actually trapping the overheated blood at the body's core -- just where it does most harm. Instead, cool the dog slowly by placing him in cool water, or by draping him with wet towels and aiming a fan at him. Offer him plenty of cool water.

If you have a thermometer, cool him until his temperature reaches 103 degrees F (39 degrees C), then stop, as it will continue to decline. As soon as you have him cooling, race him to the veterinarian. Even if he appears to have recovered, he needs to go to the veterinarian because some delayed but deadly effects can still occur even days later.

Not All Dogs Can Swim! Although swimming is a great exercise in warm weather, make sure your dog can swim first! Some breeds, such as bulldogs, French bulldogs and Pekingese, have the swimming ability of cinderblocks. And even good swimmers can drown in backyard pools if they don't know where the steps are to climb out.

Dogs and UV Rays. Dogs, especially light-skinned dogs, can get sunburn and melanoma. If you dog likes to sun worship, rub a sunblock on his belly and the top of his nose, the most common sites for sunburn.
 

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Do not leave any food items in the open while you are out. Also no treats should be left outside without your supervision when there are two dogs in your house.
Leave no ope electrical wiring which might be dangerous for your dog. Train your dog well before taking him in public places without a leash. In any case tie him with a leash to avoid mishaps. No hot articles should be left lying around. Remember that dogs are curious. They might get hurt.
 

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After working in one, I have to add avoid doggy daycares. If you must use one, read the reviews, ask people who have been there before, etc. I'm sure there are good ones, but the one where I worked advertised a separate small dog play area, but they could have one fewer staff member there if they combined all the dogs. There were so many fights, and with 40 dogs in one room, it was VERY difficult for staff members to stop it. None of the parents knew this was going on, and a lot of injuries (to the dogs and to the staff members) could have been prevented fairly easily.

On that same note, if things at the dog park get too squirrely, just leave. Sometimes, the dog park is ripe for fights, and it's not worth it to try and get in 15 more minutes of exercise. Walk instead!
 

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Lots of great tips! How about don't walk too far ahead of your dog? That's how a collar can come loose from your dog if he/she pulls backward. Also, I agree with several of you guys especially cracking window. Too little is asking for trouble, too much is asking for bigger trouble. Spend $ on one of those Othru guards and you will be happy. One of our best investments ever.
 

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Great post!

I just got back from a walk with my dog and this one came into play:
"5.) Do not allow your dog to greet other dogs on leash. Dogs on leash are forced to greet face 2 face which can be construed by one or both dogs as "rude" and someone may start a fight."

I never heard of this. A ladies German Shepard got loose and Blackie was happy to meet a new dog. When the owner came over with her other dog (on a leash), that dog started getting really aggressive, growling and biting at Blackie. The Shepard, who was loose, was not aggressive at all. He just wanted a smell.
 

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I absolutely agree with the tips to keep dogs safe. Sometimes, pet owners ignore underrated precautions like keeping your pets safe on a bonfire night or any event when firecrackers are used.
Pets really need extra care in these kind of occasions and events. Tips by GJW Titmuss on how to keep your pet safe this bonfire night might help starters to take good care of their pets. My dog is usually very stressed during this period and I hope I can manage to keep him calm this time. If anyone has any tips for bonfire night care then please let me know. Tried out tips can help more :)

Thanks.
 

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Fences, covering up any sharp drops they might fall off, pet gates to prevent adventurous dogs wandering out the front door. And of course obedience training - in particular the recall command. All these things may save your dogs life.
 

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Yes, it is true that if we keep these various points in our mind for our dog then the vet's bill can be reduced to a great extent and offcourse our pets could live a much better life.
 

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Here is a random little tip: Have a dedicated email address for your pets and use it for your vet records, pet related accounts AND ADD IT TO YOUR PET ID TAGS. Then, you can check it daily if your pets go missing. It can also be added to missing pet flyers.

I started doing this after having a few friends hand off loose dogs and cats to me that they had found, because for what ever reason they weren't comfortable calling strangers and arranging pick up, but said they had posted "found dog" listings for the animals and were ok fielding and answering emails... Some people don't like calling strangers (and in the process potentially giving out their number.) But these same people are generally ok with email. So its a good option to have both an email, a phone number and a physical address on a pet ID tag. (along with a microchip of course, in case the collar is lost).

This option also helps bridge language barriers a little bit, since you can use google or phone apps to translate emails if need be, rather than struggle through a bi-lingual phone conversation if the individual who found your pet doesn't speak your native language (or the other way around).
 

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As a child, it all depends on the dog food, medical care,exercise and safety.You "You want to make sure to give him
the best care possible.The tips of the right information in many areas for the animals to choose pet collar and Pet ID tag, to perform their new dog or cat you are traveling with your pet to be safe at home, in the cold winter months.
 

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These are some more tips for kipping your dog safe.

>NEVER FEED YOUR PUPPY FROM THE TABLE as it encourages him to BEG for food. All the members of the family must abide by this Golden Rule

>It is advisable to check with your vet, when you are about to make the change from puppy food to adult dog food

>do not offer dog human food, as their nutritional needs are far different from humans
 

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Wonderful information, thank you! I have wondered how to handle situations at the dog park!...

6.) If you need to break up a dog fight grab the dog's hind legs and wheel barrow them backward out of the fight.
 

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I agree with all of this except for the first. I feed all that enter my home together. It fights off food aggression. I guess in my way.
 
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