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Very good tips more info below ....

Trick or treat can be a super anxiety causing for your pooch. Loud kids (and adults), strangers, scary costumes, and doorbells and knocks at the door, can quickly send your dog into a frenzied state. If he hates quests, put him in a locked room with food, water, and all his favorite toys. Also, you don't want him to run away when you open the door, bark, or (even worse) bite anyone. If you are keeping him out in the open, put him on a leash so he doesn't bolt out the door. You'll also be able to control him in case someone is afraid of dogs. Tell guests (especially kids) that they can pet your pup one at a time (only if your pup is super friendly and doesn't have a history of aggression though). To keep your pup calm, you can also tire him out with lots of playtime during the day, feed him before trick or treat, and spray him with a calming spray.
 

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Emergency Preparedness:

Ok, I admit I'm a little obsessive compulsive about this, but...
I have an Envelope set up, located on the top of our Refrigerator.

It contains....

1) Copies of Inoculations, brief Medical History (both dogs)

2) Phone Numbers, Addresses and a couple of Maps, for Regular and Emergency Veterinary Service locations.

3) List of Identification Numbers, City Tag, Electronic ID, other proof of ownership.

4) Neighbor's Phone Numbers, both sides.

5) Relatively recent Pictures of both animals. (just printouts off of the computer) with a few written in measurements for sizes (height/length/weight)

6) A small amount of cash (won't say just how much)


The idea being...

GRAB IT AND GO !
 

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Also, ensure that you have a lid on your garbage can, close the seats on the toilets, shut the grate/doors on the fireplace and - if you get him or her as a puppy - always play with them while they're eating. Mess with puppy's feet, nails, ears, and mouth. It will make your (and your vet's) job so much easier in the future and the dog won't be as nervous during shots and nail clipping.

Plus, as I've learned - nervous dogs can sometimes relax if they have a friend. I'm not saying this is the case for everyone, but our older dog relaxed and is simply happier now that he has a puppy to play with/occasionally despise. It keeps Jack from taking himself too seriously.

Ditto on keeping your dog secure in the car. I just saw an article that said some people have the dog sitting in their lap with their paws on the wheel while driving. *shudder*
 

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Take the time to teach a drop on recall. It saved Auz's life.

Don't leave plastic shopping bags with handles where your pet can reach them. We had a cat get his head caught, freak, and throw himself into a heart attack. The cat died...over a plastic bag sitting on a counter.

I would like to add to getting a CBC. Once a year when your dog is young and healthy, and TWICE a year if you have a senior dog with medical problems. Monitoring organ functions and catching problems before your dog becomes symptomatic can be a life saver, even if your senior dog "acts fine".

Remove cooked bones from the house promptly after dinner. Wrap chicken bones up in a trash bag and take it outside, and put it in a container that's as critter proof as possible.

Crate or remove your dogs from a room if you're moving heavy objects and/or furniture. Sounds like a no brainer, but Dude had his foot shattered by a refrigerator cart years ago.

If you have cats, keep medications OFF the counter and put them in a cabinet. Even cats trained to not go on the countertops occasionally might, and if they knock down an open jar of medication your dog (or cat!) could eat them; and you might not realize it until they're really, really sick.

Keep your vets phone # programmed in your cell. If they don't do after hours emergency, find a place that does and program THAT number into your cell. If no cell, write the numbers and names and addresses down and hang them on your refrigerator. (If your dog is bloating, every second counts, and you don't want to waste precious time thumbing through the phone book to find an emergency care facility).
In addition to the plastic bag thing, also be aware that dogs can suffocate in any lined food container (potato chip bag, cereal box, etc.)
If you have agility equipment, NEVER leave a collapsed tunnel unattended where the dogs can get to it
If you have a swimming pool, be sure your dog knows how to get out of it, and don't give the dog unsupervised access
If you have chain link fence, be aware that dogs CAN catch a limb in it, and suffer a break (that one I know from personal experience, the rest I know from sad stories)
 

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I would like to add to the emergency preparedness list (as I live in tornado alley and get some killer winter weather)
Do NOT forget your dogs when preparing for an emergency. In a bag I not only have supplies to sustain myself and my husband for a week but also our three dogs, cat and bird.
My list for the dogs
- a week's worth of food for each animal plus a little extra (you never know when aid for animals may arrive, food for you may show up but food for rover it may not)
- a week's worth of water for each animal
- a large first aid kit
- treats
- extra medications (be sure to include a dose of heart worm medication and flea/tick treatment for each animal)
- extra leashes and tie out stakes (I would not normally tie out my dogs but in the event my house has been destroyed by a tornado I need to be able to keep them close and out of danger)
- travel water and food bowls for each dog
- blankets
- muzzle (to treat an injured dog)
- bags to clean up after the animals
- a few toys
- brush
- emergency blankets/sleeping bags
- folding shovel
- folding mess kit
- folding stove
- soap
- newspaper to use as a potty pad
- crates are in central location in the house away from windows
- a copy of medical records, shot records, adoption papers, recent photos
- Tent (to double as a crate/shelter)
To ensure I packed everything I needed I went over my dog's routine every day for a week and packed everything in the routine that the dogs could not survive without (and a few extras for comfort)
Our emergency bag remains in our hiding place during storm season so we don't have to bother grabbing it (and it's heavy with enough food, water and supplies for two people, three dogs, a cat and a bird).
We also plan our arrangement in the closet so everyone will fit if the alarms go off, which animals I grab and which ones my husband grabs (saves precious seconds in a tornado)
We keep all leashes and seat-belt harnesses directly by the back door on hooks for quick access and if severe weather is in the forecast for the evening our dogs will drag their leashes around the house behind them and wear their seat-belt harnesses (they also function as a walking harness so they are comfortable) to save time (you only have seconds in a tornado)
Every evening I assure no one has lost their rabies tags, ID tags or recovery tags in the activities of the day.
I have vet contact numbers for a few offices in a few different surrounding towns/cities
My last piece of advice - please be honest about how much water each animal needs. Ask you vet how much your dog should drink a day if you aren't sure. We literally have two huge camping jugs of water (it takes me and hubbie to move one when it is full) and two cases of water bottles.
I truly pray I will never need any of this but I would rather be prepared and never use it than have something happen and wish I had it.
 

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Dogs on a Trip – Yea or Née
If it’s Business...umm maybe no,
But if it’s a Holiday... UOO YEA !

But, there’s a good possibility of problems, IF you’re not prepared.
I’ve listed some of the things I would take, but, what’s your opinion ?

Proof of Ownership – Documents, Shot Records, Electronic ID #.
Picture(s) – Recent frontal/profile, maybe with some measurements/weight written on them.
Picture(s) - Ones of you and someone else, and the Dog (ownership history validation)
Reliable Leash’s – short and long, just in case you need to “field” it for a while.
Harness – for security during transport and when on Leashes.
A good sturdy dedicated Collar, with indelible ID/tags – and a latch that’s nearly impossible to open.
Food – something that won’t spoil if left in a variant of temperature.
Bowls – maybe the collapsible type.
Meds – with administrations (spoon/measuring) in their own Zip-Lock bag or container.
Water – container(s) applicable to size of animal(s), a ? Day supply.
Potty Pad – with a small piece of Paper Towel (stored in a Baggy), previously dabbed in it’s Urine.
Crate – maybe for when you’re out to Dinner, and great to store/transport all the above stuff.
Toy(s) – something to help time pass, and make the strange area, seem a little closer to home.
Sleep Pad (seasoned) – can line the Crate, or brought out when confinement isn’t necessary.
Ancillary Items – Brush, Toothbrush/paste, Poop Bags, depends on length of trip.

And before you start:
A good search for accommodations which are amenable to hosting animals.
Printout of Vet(s) phone and address in route/at your destination(s).

What have I missed ?
 

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I was gonna actually start a thread about this but it seems more practical to put it here. A few days ago we actually saw a little garden snake outside, now I don't know what it is doing out in this cold I can't recall a single time I have seen a snake out in this kind of weather, but had I not seen it first Lela would have been all nose and no "knows" . I am going to get a fake snake and train her to be ..well afraid of it in a way. I am get a shaker can and put the snake on the ground and when she gets near it shake the can and say NO. My hope is that if she sees a snake she will just know to avoid it all together and around here it is just necessary because we do have poisonous snakes. I may look up more on how I want to train her to avoid it, but I for sure thought it was worth mentioning that things like snakes you can't always prepare for they are small and don't warn you of their existence unless it is a rattle snake, which is why I figure a shaker can would really work cause it would hopefully sound like a rattle.
 

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amavanna,

Good luck with the Snake training !
I am very interested in hearing how that went.
But a sudggestion...
Maybe a Baby Rattle would better simulate the sound of a Rattler
or, you could get an actually Snake's Rattler, I've seen them around
at some of the Novelty Ships.
I'm just thinking on the training, that's one you ought get pretty close !

PS:
Charis, that's a very good list !
 

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amavanna,

Good luck with the Snake training !
I am very interested in hearing how that went.
But a sudggestion...
Maybe a Baby Rattle would better simulate the sound of a Rattler
or, you could get an actually Snake's Rattler, I've seen them around
at some of the Novelty Ships.
I'm just thinking on the training, that's one you ought get pretty close !
The snake training is an excellent idea in an area with rattlers and other dangerous snakes as a dog may engage a snake. Our lab kept a rattler from coming in the house and the rattler made several lunges trying to bite Dawson as he tried to kill it although I would have preferred Dawson bark and run out of strike range instead.
PS:
Charis, that's a very good list !
Thank you!
 

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You know I never thought of a imitation snake rattle that might work. I wouldn't want to use a baby rattle cause I don't want her to be afraid of the rattle sounds ( in case we ever have the rare occasion we are around a baby) per-say as much of the actual snake itself. But I am still not sure how I want to train this but I know I want to because I have already seen that she would just walk right up to one if she had the chance. I am hoping someone will see this and go hey do this ama! :p
 

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You know I never thought of a imitation snake rattle that might work. I wouldn't want to use a baby rattle cause I don't want her to be afraid of the rattle sounds ( in case we ever have the rare occasion we are around a baby) per-say as much of the actual snake itself. But I am still not sure how I want to train this but I know I want to because I have already seen that she would just walk right up to one if she had the chance. I am hoping someone will see this and go hey do this ama! :p
You have a very good point there, but given how discriminating a Dog's hearing is, the "real" rattler "tail" may be the best way to go.

Again, just as a sudggestion...
I have two "commands" which you may have similar ones for your animal.
I would give my "GET BACK" first, then...
the "SPEAK" command.
(HA please note the order, get out of the way FIRST, then bark :D)
Of course, it would take some rigorous training, to assure compliance.
Good Luck !
 

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Houston I like that how sounds, it not only prevents her from getting bit but gives me a warning so *I* dont get bit or doG forbid my kid if she is with us. I am working on speak but I think I would kinda need to change speak to almost an alert with this kind of thing. I guess the first thing I would get her to do is recognize "see snake back up fast!" and then I can work up to the bark once she is back to my side . ( Coarse this is assuming I can get her to get to my side we are still working on heel or side. ) I will be getting the fake snake soon and will work on it, if other people have dogs that are better trained then lela or have done some kind of snake avoidance training I would love to hear your results.
 

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amavanna,

Thank you for your very kind words.
I know this is "other" than the usual "stay beside me" procedure,
which we normally train our Dogs to do...
But in the case of woods/brush/limited vision, I would humbly
recommend that you teach your animal to step out ahead of you,
and be specially willing to lead your child through such.

We all love them SO much, but need to remember
how much more qualified they are, to alert against threats.
My command to my animals to "take the lead" is "get get" :)

One other thing...
I know that there are personally owned medications,
which can be carried (and injected) in instances where a human
is bitten by a poisonous snake. Surely that exist for K9's well.
I'll try to do a search to see if that is available, but,
if anyone knows of that, please mention it !

Have a good Day ! :)
S.W.
 

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Do not use cleansers in your toilets. You can get it plenty clean by just scrubbing it with a brush. Even if you're super careful to keep the lid closed, a guest might not and those cleansers can be deadly. Ditto for flushing old medicines down the toilet.
 

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scorpio,

What a very thoughtful thing to do, and, not only for one's animals !

However, outside temperates occasionally make opening a window (even a little)
quite uncomfortable.

When using the Air Conditioning (cooling)...
Most vehicles have two modes. Regular, which influxes Fresh Air into the vehicle, and
a Recirculate or "MAX" mode. The Regular would be the one to choose for Fresh Conditioned Air.

In the Heat Mode...
All Vehicles (as far as I know) influx Fresh Air when heating.
So, you're covered there.

Other...
It's not necessary to provide an escape to accommodate for the influx
of Fresh Air. Vehicles are just not that well sealed, and in some instances
vehicles have a provision installed to allow flow. Usually via the Trunk.
and...
When in very heavy traffic, I usually turn the A/C to Recirculate in the Summer
or just shut the heat off for a while, rather than having the Carbon Monoxide
pulled into the Vehicle. (not good for either of us).
 

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Enjoy readining all of this. In my opinion one of the most important things to teach your dog is a stay command. That command itself saved my dog's life couple of times.

lucas
 

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Addition to 13 (two pages ago)

If you can, honk your horn before you turn it on.

I once acutally had to pop my hood because a cat (chased by my dog) went into the engine from underneath and when I popped the hood, was sitting on top of the engine. Figure that one out, lol. I wouldn't have even seen her if I hadn't seen the dog chase her into my truck.
Honking the horn will usually scare what ever is in your vehicle that you cant see, out of it.
 

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Addition to 13 (two pages ago)

If you can, honk your horn before you turn it on.

I once acutally had to pop my hood because a cat (chased by my dog) went into the engine from underneath and when I popped the hood, was sitting on top of the engine. Figure that one out, lol. I wouldn't have even seen her if I hadn't seen the dog chase her into my truck.
Honking the horn will usually scare what ever is in your vehicle that you cant see, out of it.
Well i think it scare whats everything in your vehicle when start it.
 

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Well i think it scare whats everything in your vehicle when start it.
You think but I know there is rarely enough time between when you turn that key and when the motor turns over once for the animal to get out. And it only takes 1 turn to kill the animal. I have seen too many animals fly out of a motor (or pickups, tractors, etc.) in chunks (dead).
 
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