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Discussion Starter #1
Have any of you heard of a rescue that does not follow through with health testings prior to adoption?? Reason for asking is an individual adopted a dog and it would die from heart worm a few weeks after the adoption.. I have worked and volunteered for a few rescues and all of them had the dogs tested before release.. So do you think it strange that this would happen? Or do you think something else transpired?
 

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Depending on the rescue organization, depends on the amount of treatment each individual dog gets. Most rescue organizations are in the red zone so they do only what is necessary to deem the dog healthy at the point of adoption.

Most organizations should do puppy vaccines, wormers, flea control, and offer a spay or neuter and do a health check (done by the vet). They should not guarantee congenital defects (a pure bred breeder should). If you are dealing with an adult, the vaccines should be the typical yearly adult vaccines. De-fleaing and de-worming should also be done as a precautionary. However unless, the puppy or dog exhibits any symptoms indicating something is unusual, there shouldn't be any tests done. Shelters can't afford it, and there are way too many to do.

I think it is up to the vet who gives the dog the initial exam to consider extra tests being done. An approved health check(which most dogs are adopted out with) means the vet deems the dog healthy.
 

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IF our rescue adopts out a dog with heartworm, it's with the tretment provided. HOWEVER most of the time we will NOT adopt out a dog until it's checked out heartworm clear. Of course I'm involved wit Mastiff rescue and the treatments are VERY expensive so we try to be sure the adoptor gets a healthy dog, not one they're going to have to pay out thousands in vet bills for.

Did the rescue inform the adoptor tht the dog HAD heartworm? It's not somehthing that would be easily missed and any reputable rescue will have the test done (it's pretty cheap, just a blood draw and a look under the microscope). Now, if it was a public shelter, that's a different story, they often don't have a vet staff in some rural areas.
 

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That's what I thought... this person supposedly adopted a dog from a rescue and said the dog had heart worms and she did not have the money to care for the dog.. Thus she just allowed the dog die on its own.. tell me is that not over whelming and cruel..???

I could not figure out why she did not contact the rescue or attempt in a payment schedule with a vet.. some people
 

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That's ashamed, many vets will prescrbe liquid Ivermectine, which is given in low doses to kill the HW gradually. It's about 1/5 the cost of heartgaurd and very safe and effective as long as it's used as prescribed. It's also commonly used to treat Demodex as well as to prevent HW ( I use it for this).
 

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Yes, it's just very very wrong.. The SPCA and or rescue should have been contacted.. the poor dog had to suffer.. why because the new owner had no feelings and or care..
 

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That's what I thought... this person supposedly adopted a dog from a rescue and said the dog had heart worms and she did not have the money to care for the dog.. Thus she just allowed the dog die on its own.. tell me is that not over whelming and cruel..???

I could not figure out why she did not contact the rescue or attempt in a payment schedule with a vet.. some people
It surprises me that, the shelter was willing to adopt her a dog when she doesn't have any money. If she knew it had heartworm, and couldn't afford treatment, then how was she planning on feeding the dog and caring for it? It all sounds a little fishy to me.
 

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We just adopted a dog with heart worm, although he had his treatments before coming to us. The rescue told us up front what was involved. THis was their first dog that they have dealt with that had heartworm, and so they were honest about not knowing certain things and needing to check out the protocol.

I can't believe a rescue not knowing something was wrong. In order to die from heartworm it must have been a very sever case. They should have realized that something medically was wrong as I'm guessing he would not have a lot of energy etc.


It takes about 2 years for heart worms to fully develop....
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I do not know the whole situation.. but this is what was stated on another forum. I know the rescue I used to work for made sure the dogs were healthy before leaving and if there was an issue the adoptee knew about it.. The whole thing is off the wall if you ask me..I think something else happened to the dog and the poster is lying.. Not my place to judge but something does not add up..JMPO
 

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Something's definitely fishy. A person wouldn't knowingly adopt a sick dog if they couldn't afford vet care. Since this person didn't care about the dog, only the $ she wouldn't have wasted money on food for a lost cause. I hope she never gets another living thing again. This is outright abuse and she should be jailed for letting that dog suffer.

I have adopted 2 dogs from the Humane Society. For the first dog I had a 45 minute interview before adoption and was informed that the dog came from a state where heartworm was prevelent but that they did not test for it so I would have to have it done at my vet's office. Ok, no problem. Ten years later, when I adopted the second dog there was no interview at all. I was shocked. Just fill this out and give us $200. He is a nice dog but, large and high energy so he had been returned twice already. I took my new dog home with a large packet of paperwork and made an appt. to have my vet check him the next day. Reading through my paperwork I noticed that this dog had had parvo 6 weeks earlier and was currently being treated for giardia. When I had asked if this dog had any known health problems I had been told no. They were closed so I called the next morning and was told that they hadn't given him his meds or rechecked him. That I could pay to have my vet do it even though it was suposed to have been done the day that I adopted him. Our other dog at home could have been infected and the other dogs at the shelter since he had been in public areas and allowed to relieve himself. I couldn't believe it.
 

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That's why, if I adopt a dog from a shelter it goes to the vet BEFORE it comes into my home. I have a certian vet I used for this (not my everyday vet as he has a two week wait for nonurgents), I call that morning and she has ne come in within the hour after picking the dog up. I do the same with her if I'm bringing in a dog for the rescue. NO dogs come into my house or yard, even for an hour awaiting transport, without a full vet check. We also require new adoptees to have a vet check within 3 days, which is faxed into me and I then fax it into the National adoption CoOdinator.
 

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Thats funny you say that Carla, I did not know this, but from instinct, all my pups when picked up, went to the vet first before they came home. I remember my present female, (which I love to death) the vet took one look at the baby teeth and surprised me when she told me my girl will have crooked teeth, did not think they could tell so soon. I could have returned her but she was the only female in the litter, and we bonded already:)yes in minutes. When we brought her home she acted like she lived here from day one. lo
 

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I do not know the whole situation.. but this is what was stated on another forum. I know the rescue I used to work for made sure the dogs were healthy before leaving and if there was an issue the adoptee knew about it.. The whole thing is off the wall if you ask me..I think something else happened to the dog and the poster is lying.. Not my place to judge but something does not add up..JMPO
Honestly, what strikes me as most fishy is that a group would have adopted out a VERY sick dog. A dog can live with heartworm for a relatively long time, if it was within weeks of dying from heartworm then it was already showing major symptoms. It probably couldn't breathe, couldn't really walk any distance, and at that point you could have heard heart issues just listening to it, nevermind having to test (though of course you would to find the cause of the heart issue).

In other words, what sort of person who can't afford vet care adopts such an obviously sick animal? Nevermind having to believe that there is a group out there that would adopt out such an animal.

Oh, and ivermectin can be a good treatment but if this dog died within weeks it probably would have with ivermectin or not. Ivermectin takes 2 years to kill heartworms completely and in that time they are still able to do some damage to the dogs heart. For a dog to be in the last stages of heartworm disease he wouldn't have had time for it to work. Even the stronger medication probably would not have worked to tell the truth because of to much damage to the heart already. Immiticide is arsenic based and can be very hard on a dog. Give it to a dog in the end stage of heartworm and you might kill the worms but you might kill the dog as well from all the worms dying off at once. Plus, towards the end heartworms travel to other organs and attack them as well.

The only chance the dog probably had was surgical removal of the heartworms and that's if he survived the surgery in the first place. Then when recovered from that immiticide treatment would be effective and less dangerous since there would be fewer worms dying at once.
 

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In other words, many reputable rescues would have probably had the dog PTS to end it's suffering.

I've never dealt with HW in that late stage, though I've heard about it.
 
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