Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
173 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have inquired about this dog and his habit of barking during training, he is a 13 year old beagle who has been with us since were were neophyte dog owners, and is used to getting treats for nothing. Even what we have asked of him, sit and down, are very easy for him to perform.

We now have a new member of family, a reactive whippet mix, and we need to train her, and this old boy some new tricks to help with impulse control. And so, waiting for 1 second for a treat when training down-stay, elicits howling and barking (Give me the treat!). I cannot imagine 1 minute of this howling, much less to a release cue.

Is there a way to train this old boy to wait for his treat like everyone else?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,977 Posts
What's wrong with barking, especially if it's out of eagerness and drive/desire? Is he maintaining the down-stay, even amid his high desire? If so, I'd say he's already showing impulse control by maintaining the behavior/position instead of breaking it. He's waiting by virtue of continuing to perform the signaled behavior.

Of course, it's just me and I actually prefer training Wally when he's hyped up like that. He performs faster, I get to have him practice working and thinking in highly charged drive/emotion, and he seems to enjoy the whole thing a lot more. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
173 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I forgot to mention that, he breaks the stay almost instantly after the treat comes out of my pouch. He gets so animated for the treat, its like there is nothing that he can be taught. It was doing the Doggie Zen program that I ran into this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,322 Posts
I forgot to mention that, he breaks the stay almost instantly after the treat comes out of my pouch. He gets so animated for the treat, its like there is nothing that he can be taught. It was doing the Doggie Zen program that I ran into this.
I would use a clicker and not bring a treat out until after releasing him of after you have clicked the desired behavior.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,343 Posts
The clicker solution is a sound one.

Personally, if it were me, I'd temporarily get rid of the treat pouch. It just takes way too long to retrieve in most instances. Instead, covertly hide one treat between your index and middle finger, mark the desired behaviour, and present the reward quickly, IN POSITION, much the same way as how a magician pulls a coin from behind your ear. Then release from position, and repeat.

tip: two, three, or four treats in (rapid) succession with variable / increasing intervals between them eventually, will also encourage your dog to remain put until verbal release is given.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top