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As a chihuahua owner, I've never had this problem before lol. My new chihuahua puppy is an anomaly, and at 5 months old she can jump on the couch. For a few weeks now, I've been telling her "off" and either picking her up and setting her on the floor, or by telling her "off" and gesturing until she jumps off. Clearly, this is not working.

Help!?
 

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If your pup is anything like mine, she might see the "off" and removal as a game or as reinforcement (since you talk and touch her during the process). I have a large and clingy dog and I avoided the couch issue entirely by doing this:

-Dog on leash in the room. Reward for calm behavior, sits and downs are great.
-Continue the training as you move towards the couch. Continue training as you slowly sit down.
-Repeat until dog sees "you sitting on couch" as a cue to settle on the floor.

You can add a bed to the training as well. I also had my dog dragging a leash in the house for the first few months so that I could lead him away from things without needing to put my hands on him. I did teach "off" separately using luring at first, and practicing outside of the home (ex. playground equipment). I think in the last 10 months or so he's gotten on a couch twice and got off when I told him. No big deal. All of this training teaches the dog: 1. couches are irrelevant, 2. settling on the ground is rewarded.
 

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If your pup is anything like mine, she might see the "off" and removal as a game or as reinforcement (since you talk and touch her during the process). I have a large and clingy dog and I avoided the couch issue entirely by doing this:

-Dog on leash in the room. Reward for calm behavior, sits and downs are great.
-Continue the training as you move towards the couch. Continue training as you slowly sit down.
-Repeat until dog sees "you sitting on couch" as a cue to settle on the floor.

You can add a bed to the training as well. I also had my dog dragging a leash in the house for the first few months so that I could lead him away from things without needing to put my hands on him. I did teach "off" separately using luring at first, and practicing outside of the home (ex. playground equipment). I think in the last 10 months or so he's gotten on a couch twice and got off when I told him. No big deal. All of this training teaches the dog: 1. couches are irrelevant, 2. settling on the ground is rewarded.
I agree with this advice. My dog is allowed on the couch at our house, but not at my parent's, so I used something similar to this process, just more casual because we're only there for the weekend typically and the couch is full of people bodies, so he can't be up there, anyway. I always bring a bed with for Ralphie and tell him "go to bed!" when he seems like he wants to lay on the couch, then reward him. I reward him intermittently for remaining on his bed, too.

To add to Canyx's advice, make sure the pup can't get on the couch when you're not watching. Sometimes dogs obey the "no couch" rule when people are home, but when they leave they're up on the couch!
 

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With my 3 yr old golden retriever, I just sternly said "no" and pushed him off, seemed to work...
Thankfully, there are much kinder and more effective ways to train these days than setting dogs up to fail and using force in these situations. Not to mention the fact that many dogs find touch ("no") and contact (push) rewarding, many dogs will learn to simply not do the behavior if a person isn't watching, many dogs (especially tiny ones like chihuahuas) can be injured by these methods, and many dogs will bite a person for pushing it.


Training with management to prevent unwanted behavior, and reinforcement of desired decisions work to prevent all those potential consequences.

What worked for your dog in your situation is fine, but think twice about recommending such archaic and potentially harmful advice for a stranger whom you don't even know. Especially, if you've read the original post, the owner already tried "For a few weeks now, I've been telling her "off" and either picking her up and setting her on the floor" which is a gentler application of force. Clearly it's not working, and I don't think anyone who cares about the welfare of this tiny dog would think 'well, let me PUSH her off instead'.
 
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