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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello i have a 5 month old golden, that is addicted to people, everyone. Everytime he gets close to a person he gets very excited and often jumps on people. Today he jumped on a little girl and she fell down so this is getting problematic and will be even more problematic when he gets bigger. I taught him not to jump on me or family members by turning my back, giving the leg... but with strangers cant figure out how to teach him not to jump and how be calm around strangers.
Advice please?
 

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I hear you... I got jumped on by a 60lb dog last week end and he seriously scratched my arm. Two of my dogs were that way too...

My advice is, if possible, to get him to sit first, before letting people pet him. Or, put your foot on the leash so he can't jump up. Definitely keep asking everyone who will listen to completely ignore him until he sits nicely.

It's one of the hardest thing to train dogs out of!
 

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At this point, keep him back from people. It is that simple. Leash and, if he is too strong for you because he pulls, use a pinch collar so you have more control. No one needs to pet your dog.

Having him sit is a good idea, but he must be reliable about sitting and not jumping up from the sit.

You need to be 100% consistent training him to sit. IOW's if you tell him to sit he has to sit until you release him, give him another command or he dies.

Most people tell the dog to sit and the dog does and then the dog gets up.. because the person is distracted.. and so the dog releases himself from the command. You need to make that sit reliable and have duration until you release him from it with a marker word (I used YES) or give him a new command such as "down" or "heel" or whatever.
 

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Begin walking your dog toward the stranger to say hello. If your dog gets too excited—tugging on leash, bouncing around, barking, and so on—get their attention back on you while backing up a step or two.
Give your dog a moment to calm down (standing or sitting is OK), then begin to approach the person again. Repeat Step 2 each time your dog gets too excited to greet.
 

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All of the advice given so far is good. I will add that you could also try scattering treats on the ground if he gets too excited. The idea is that he learns keeping all four feet on the ground is more rewarding than jumping up.

Pepper had a major issue with jumping up when she was younger. It look a long time to train her out of it and she still will jump up now if she gets way too excited (with certain people who don't enforce her staying down).
 

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Enthusiasm is one of the charms of a Golden. As Franc127 and others suggested, teach a solid Sit, and you might put a foot on the leash so that he can't jump, once he is sitting. You might also look up the method called, It's Yer Choice, [spelled in that way]. Then, get some friends to work with you and come to greet him.

When he begins to jump, cue him to sit. Then, indicate that your friend can interact. And, when your Golden tries to break the Sit to jump on your friend, have your friend move away until the dog Sits. If the dog doesn't sit, then ask your friend to leave the room momentarily, until the dog calms down ... on his own with only a little "Sit" guidance from you. When the dog Sits, then friend re-enters. If the dog stands, the friend backs up ... moving forward only when the dog sits. This process can go on for 10 minutes or so as the Dog learns that he 'controls' the action and access, by sitting. After 2 or 3 days, even with a 5mos Golden, he will begin to learn some impulse control.

[BTW, you can use a similar method to get him to Sit before you open any door or gate ... closing it if he stands, or freezing if he won't Sit. Although frustrating initially, this is a powerful technique that you can use in many situations, once both of you understand how to use it.]
 

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The 'throwing treats on the ground' thing is what was suggested by our puppy trainer, by the way. By the time they've eaten the treats, they are usually a bit calmer and less likely to jump up. Not very applicable outside with strangers though...
 

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When it comes to wild, jumpy, dogs, I usually work on making them sit before the stranger enters. If they sit nicely, I allow the stranger to reward them with attention. If the dog is crazy, I ask the stranger to ignore them, and I’ll hold them still. This has always worked with the many crazy pups I’ve worked with. The dog wants to greet the stranger. For them, the reward is getting to greet them- so making them wait and calm themselves before doing so, trains them to have manners. This is crucial, especially in big dogs who could potentially seriously injure someone they jump on. Best of luck with training!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
thanks guys for all the great tips! He does a pretty solid sit, but he easily breaks it when he gets excited by people and dogs. Sounds I have to work on him maintaining the sit. Gonna be hard getting strangers to cooperate which is what makes training this so hard, but i will try my best
thanks
 
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