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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Alright, I'm stuck on what to do. Situation being that my 80lbs 4 year old dog has now taken to jumping on everyone that comes to the door and it has to stop. He hasn't always done this, it's really been the last 10 months since we moved to our new home that I noticed it starting and it's now EVERYTIME someone comes he does this. When my husband or I come home it's a non-issue, he knows to go lay down when we get in the door and it's a low key atmosphere without any running around or excitement. Unfortunately I haven't found it to be so easy with company.

Points to note and things tried:

He has moved with us before, currently we've had our new home for 10 months.

I can have an open front door and water the flowers or fetch a paper and if I tell him to stay inside he will.

We rescued him at 9 months, now 4 years old, worked out seperation anxiety and we can now leave him home alone without destruction.

I've tried holding him on a leash, but he still jumps.

I've kept a leash hooked to our coffee table, handmade/wrought iron and indestructable, and while he couldn't jump he would whine and bark. (he hardly ever, ever, ever barks now he'll do it if he can't reach the person whose to the house.)

I've held his collar and scolded him every time he jumps but he still would do it.

He needs a full 5 minutes to calm down and stop being a pain.

What can I do to stop him from being rude to people who come to my home???
 

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Here's what I would do. Exercise him WELL before guests arrive. When guests come, the dog is gated in another room. Ignore the whining and barking. When he calms, let him in. If he doesn't behave, he goes right back. Repeat as necessary. Don't give him ANY slack. One jump and it's out of the room.

It may take several visits from friends till he gets it, but he eventually will IF you're consistent and strict. Enlist a few friends to come by for 5-10 minute visits to help you expose him to company as often as possible, because the more he experiences this routine, the quicker you can get back to a normal life.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Most company I have at the door, 90%, is completly unexpected. Even as frequent as people come by, be it a neighbor, sister or mailman I hardly ever have any notice more then a doorbell.

I just don't think that putting him in the bathroom is going to teach him anything or calm him down to be honest. When he's leashed to a table he will whine and bark until he's unleashed.... although I think the longest I've kept him like that is abou 30-45 minutes.
 

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I just don't think that putting him in the bathroom is going to teach him anything or calm him down to be honest.
It's not going to teach him to calm down. This is what he will learn:

I'm in the bathroom barking and going crazy. Mom is ignoring me. I'm tired. I'm going to sleep. Mom comes and lets me out. Oh, there's company! Excitement and jump! Mom takes me back to the boring room. I bark for a while. It doesn't do any good. I stop barking. Mom lets me out! Oh, there's company! Excitement and jump! Mom takes me back to the boring room. I bark for a while. It doesn't do any good. I stop barking. Mom lets me out. There's company. I don't want to go back to the boring room. I'll just lie down here.

Now that's not exactly what he's thinking, of course, but that's the idea.

When he's leashed to a table he will whine and bark until he's unleashed...
And here's what that teaches him:

If I keep whining and barking, mom will eventually let me go.

Have you leashed him up and given him a frozen Kong?
Have you taught him the "quiet" command?
 

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Here's what I would do. Exercise him WELL before guests arrive. When guests come, the dog is gated in another room. Ignore the whining and barking. When he calms, let him in. If he doesn't behave, he goes right back. Repeat as necessary. Don't give him ANY slack. One jump and it's out of the room.

It may take several visits from friends till he gets it, but he eventually will IF you're consistent and strict. Enlist a few friends to come by for 5-10 minute visits to help you expose him to company as often as possible, because the more he experiences this routine, the quicker you can get back to a normal life.
Great advice. Instead of tying him to a table is there a room or space you can gate him in?

Here's what I did, when guests would come I would leash Rowdy and let the guests in the door - the instant Rowdy's paws left the ground I would say "WHOOPS!" (not mean, not scolding, just in a neutral tone) and immediately and lead him behind the baby gate for a few secs. This was repeated until he could keep all fours on the floor. The message here is when he jumps he gets isolated. This takes some work, it's not a quick fix - he may fuss and fight but you have to wait until he's calm to let him out.
I also second the idea enlisting of friends to help you repeat this exercise.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
He doesn't get kongs anymore, not really looking to get into that one again to be honest *lol. I'm open to giving him one or two treats though!

And what I meant by unleashing him, is that he will whine and bark until the people leave and then I unleash him... seems silly to keep him leashed up when the folks are gone.

Basically I want to fix the problem of him jumping on people without having to remove him from the situation. I do have lots of people that come to the door, I work from home and recieve lots of shipment so as much as the mailman or delivery person would like a coffee break while I train the dog it's not really an option. Most people are here for between 2 minutes to 30 minutes max an hour. If I have company longer he does calm down but the deed has been done and it's back to square one next time the doorbell rings. I really want to curtail the behaviour rather then falling into the habit of just putting him a seperate room, I will do that if I have to... just not fond of the idea.
 

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And what I meant by unleashing him, is that he will whine and bark until the people leave and then I unleash him... seems silly to keep him leashed up when the folks are gone.
Sometimes you have to be silly. :D I would leave him leashed until he stops whining. When you unleash him, he very likely associates it with the wining and crying he did.

Basically I want to fix the problem of him jumping on people without having to remove him from the situation. [...] I really want to curtail the behaviour rather then falling into the habit of just putting him a seperate room,
It sounds to me like you want some kind of punishment. There are punishments that would probably work, but I wouldn't use them in this situation, so I can't really advise anything for you. Hopefully, someone else will have some idea for you.

Good luck. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
aaacck, omg no! More like tricks and tips from people who have found something that works. I tried a few things that are almost working but I have to be focused on the dog and as soon as I start talking to the person at the door, woosh he goes *lol. Basically I've gotten a tiny bit of success with the following and I'm looking for something like this except more info of the tried and true:

Doorbell rings
I look out the door to the person standing there and do the -one sec please- with the index finger
Tell Taylor to sit and have my hand in a stop motion and maintain eye contact
Slowly open the door, if his but leaves the floor or I get the wiggle, then close the door
Repeat the sit and stay
Repeat as needed until I can fully open the door without him moving his bum
At this point I've been bouncing eye contact and focus between Taylor and person at door and everything looks good.
I focus and start to converse with person at door and woosh Taylor does his jumping thing.

So I'm looking to build on that, no yelling or swearing or dragging him by the collar to another room, I want to be able to open the door with him sitting by my side calm cool and collected *smiles*.
 

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My Aussie pup jumps when people bend over to pet him and I am afraid he is going to bonk someone on the head. I've not had this problem with my other Aussie (RIP), but she had other issues.

I am trying to figure out how to get this wonderful puppy to stop this kind of jumping.
 

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I would borrow a friend for the evening. Have the friend ring the door bell. If the dog gets excited, have him sit. Open the door. If the dog gets up, shut the door. If the dog sees the other person and gets excited, immediately correct him and make him sit again. Lather, rinse, repeat as needed.
 

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I think you've answered your own question, but you are going to have to TRAIN this to get it into his head. Teach him a place to sit and stay while you are dealing with your guests. That will work too - but just like the suggestion both FourIsCompany and I have given (which WORKS) it's going to take time to train.
 

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2 different issues at play:

i) Breaking his stay. After he is told to sit and stay he can't move until you release him, even if a poodle with a steak on its head walks thru the door. You need to give a correction (a sound, a poke, whatever is appropriate) the moment he starts to get up; its about timing, using the right intensity, consistency and repetition. Sometimes better to give a few more severe corrections (after you are sure he understands the command in the first place) that he will remember than 'nagging' him. No shortcuts. Its easy to practice down / stay in lots of different places and circumstances, and its a hugely useful command. You just haven't made it foolproof yet. Take him to the dog park and make him down stay 10 meters away from dogs playing, etc etc. Could use an e-collar to help as well.

ii) Jumping on people. Should never be allowed, excited or not. You or the jumpee need to give a correction the moment his paws are landing on someone - again timing, using the right intensity, consistency and repetition. No shortcuts.

You may want to look at this thread for some alternate opinions:
http://www.dogforums.com/3-dog-training-forum/53400-biting-out-anxiety.html
 
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