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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,
We recently rescued a 1-yr old Bernese Mountain Dog. Great girl, house trained, walks almost well on the leash, crate trained.

We have her for few weeks now, so the human-dog bond is not in place yet...
She can sit on command, but not always. Even at home with no distraction she might ignore our commands for a while.

The biggest problem for now - she jumps on us when we come home, and she keeps nipping for a minute or two. Looks like she's really excited to see us and wants to play. This is understandable after the whole day alone in the crate even with her toys and Kongs. But she's big, and I don't like the idea of 50+ pounds dog jumping on me or guests.

We tried to turn around and ignore her, but it's impossible to do because she's jumping around like crazy and nipping your hands. Also it's hard to walk away, because she's following you.
We also tried to use clicker and reward her when all 4 paws are on the floor. It works, but only for a second or two, then she starts jumping/biting again. Biting is relatively gentle, but I think it's still not good. As I've said, she stops after a minute, but I would like to teach her NOT to do it at all.

Any ideas/suggestions?
 

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Try doing this in the bathroom or some other puppy safe room. Play with her, spend some time with her, if she starts nipping say "Ouch" and leave the room. Go back in 30-40 seconds. Try again. Because she follows you, you need to reiterate to her that nipping means all fun ends.

Another thing to try is have her on a harness/leash and tie the leash to something sturdy. Play play play and when she nips it's "ouch!" and walk away. Nipping means you leave with the toys and all fun ends.

It takes time but she'll get it.

For jumping you can do a number of things.
1. Teach an incompatible behavior. Use the clicker and some good treats and teach her to sit. Now keep treats on you at all times in your pocket. If she tries jumping pull out a treat, tell her sit, and give her a treat. She, over time, will learn sitting gets me rewards and jumping doesn't.

2. If she jumps up do the turn around. THE MOMENT ALL FOUR HIT THE FLOOR REWARD. You say it doesn't work but are you rewarding when all four are on the floor? Even if she is getting ready to jump again if there are 4 feet on the ground you shove a cookie in her mouth.

It takes time but these methods work if you just stay patient. Puppies are horrible sometimes but just hang in there.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you Nil,

We'll try your suggestions.

Maya spends her days in the crate when we are not home, and the hardest moment is when we let her out. She doesn't have her collar on at this moment (we remove it when she's in the cage), so it's impossible to attach a leash immediately. And the first minute is the time when she jumps on you and bites. It's not a real bite, but not very gentle either...
We always have a clicker and some treats when we open the door, and we ALWAYS reward her when she stays on the floor even for 2 secs. The problem is - she's gulping her treat, and jumps again. After a minute or two she calms down, and after that she's an amazing dog.

But I hope that with the time and patience she improve.
 

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I also learned from having had a boxer (notorious for jumping!), that when you turn around, cross your arms over your chest. This takes your fingers out of the picture, which will reduce the pups tendency to nip. I had to do this with Maddie, as well, when we first got her. Terriers also tend to be nippers; she was constantly jumping up to nip my fingers as I walked across the room. I looked silly walking around the house with my hands folded across my chest, but she finally learned not to nip (I also cried "ouch" when she did manage to nip me). I agree to turn around - no attention, talking at all while they jump on you from behind. If he won't stop, I also agree to go to another room and shut the door for a few minutes - again, no conversation. Dogs HATE to be ignored, so when you ignore them, it's an effective correction. Warning: it may get worse before it gets better. Definitely reward at the beginning with a high value treat the instant you get the desired behavior.
 

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You have a few options, but I think first and foremost (as hard as it is!): don't make a big deal when you come home. Don't say "Hi puppy! I missed you!" Practice some self control coming out of the crate (i.e. you don't come out until I say you can even if the door's open). Then, just reach in, put on the leash, say "let's go" and quickly walk outside to potty. When your pup jumps up, play "tree." Don't turn around, just cross your arms and stand as still and tall as you can. Another option is to move towards your dog when they go to jump on you. It will throw your dog off (they're used to people stepping backwards). Four on the floor gets rewarded with praise. :)

ETA: In this sort of situation, I think the reward should be your attention and pets, not treats. If you use treats you could inadvertently be teaching your dog a behavior chain: jump up, then immediately sit gets treats! If your dog jumps up, cross your arms and say "ugh oh!" or "oops!" and just reach down to pet. He's already excited to see you--any excess petting (for lack of a better phrase) could just overstimulate and cause more jumping.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thank you all guys,

Looks like we just need to be patient and consistent, and eventually Maya will learn. She's not a small puppy, she's 1 year old Bernese and already weights about 50 lbs, so it's not easy to stay still when she jumps. And if we ignore her, she just jumps higher and nips at the elbows, folded hands, or even our backs. Not a pleasant thing!
I just wish her previous owner did better job to teach her manners. :)

And I have one more question - maybe someone can give me tips. Maya is crazy about food, and might finish her bowl in 15 secs if we let her. Our vet told us that it is dangerous to eat so fast, and we have to slow her down.
So far the best way to do it is to hand-feed her, and it works well - she learned to sit and wait for each kibble.
We tried to give her food in the exercise cube, and it worked, but she gets very excited. So probably this is not the best solution. And all special bowls do absolutely nothing to slow her down.

I don't mind to hand-feed her, but I'm wondering if there's a way to teach a dog to eat slowly.
 

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Get a slip lead, you can have it ready to go on top of her crate and loop it on her head as she comes out of the crate. Works every time!

You can also have a treat placed in the yard before she goes out there. Put it on the sidewalk or have a bowl or whatever, and work with her outside of coming home teach her to 'find her cookie' or whatever you want to use. Then before you come in the house, place the cookie out there. When you go to let her out of her crate start asking her to 'find the cookie' and get the leash on (if you need to leash her) and take her to the cookie. You could also place a few other cookies out there at the same time, if they're stinky enough for her to air scent she'll soon catch on to the game and it'll give her something to do besides bite you.

For eating you can either add some water to her food, feed her in small batches or give in to the gobbling. I've seen some dogs that eat so fast that it comes back up and they eat it twice, gross but they're older dogs and have done it all their lives. Labs are usually like that.
 
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