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Default Jekyll and Hyde
My sweet 4 1/2 month old labradoodle was just moving along quite nicely. She graduated from puppy obedience two weeks early. Smart as a tack. Aside from the occasional bird or dog, she walked very well on a leash, and generally would respond to commands.

Then? All hell has broke loose. I was told about this relapse, but I had no idea that it would be this bad. The reason I say that is.....I am early retired, and I have been with her from the first day. She gets walks everyday and has close supervision. She also would go into her kennel with no problems. She'd sleep all night without a peep.

One week short of her 5 month stage, she has turned into a wild beast. She chewed the corner off the coffee table. (never chewed the furniture before, because she has plenty of chew toys). She barks at any movement out our yard into the park. She lurches at the birds, dogs, and humans. She no longer responds to commands....unless it is to her benefit. She know barks and barks and barks....loud mind you....just to hear herself bark! Very demanding animal. I ignore the barking most of the time, when it isn't to go to the bathroom or wanting a drink of water. Now she complains about being kenneled at night when initially put in for the night. Last night she whined and barked for about 20 minutes. She never use to do that.

My wife comes home and cannot understand why I am so flustered. I now have a true appreciation of how new mothers feel stuck at home with their 2 and 3 year old kids allllll day long!!!!

I don't know if this is a typical stage that she will eventually grow out of.....or I just happened to have purchased the demon seed....I mean, she is black.

20 years ago, I had a golden that was a dream to train....guess I was spoiled.
 

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Puppies are so fun! My newest dog also did very well in school, while I learned how to patch drywall and repair a staircase.

That was around 6 months of age, she was mostly out of it by 1 year. The lab I had took three times that long, but never ate drywall - so I guess it's a trade-off. :) Just stay consistent throughout, the positive training that worked before the hormones kicked in will work after, it's just a bumpy road in between. I stayed the "reward the good, ignore the bad" course until we were through the storm, and then began more advanced training. Just keep at the basics through the rough patches, falling back on known successes when necessary. And exercise, exercise, exercise. Then exercise some more. A tired dog is a quiet dog.
 

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I, at 62, was walking my dog 3 miles in the morning and 3+ in the afternoon for quite a while. Now...with my knee pain...most likely tendonitis....I am disabled. I hate it. She is wound up as tight as a drum!
 

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She's being a normal dog... aka a holy terror :) I've been enjoying a young pit bull foster for the past few months that is as sweet as can be, but (was) a total ball of uncontrolled energy known as the "tasmanian devil dog" so I somewhat understand your pain. She's made great progress and I bet your pup will too.

If you have a fenced yard, teach her fetch. If not, get a long leash (50 ft!) and try that. Are you taking any class after the puppy obedience? Maybe try rally or nosework or trick training.

Know any well behaved dogs for play dates? Can you ask around to find some?

Take her new places and train at them. Take her someplace like the park with a bunch of treats and ask her to sit. Treat repeatedly for a quiet sit. then ask for a down and treat for that repeatedly. Work up to a long sit/stay or down/stay. Make her mind work and work. Distraction proofing is both useful to you and hard work for the dog.
 

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I would keep going with school and keep her busy with at home training and exercise. Most of the time they offer different levels of obedience and one class might not be enough. I have a 6.5 month old German Shepherd(very high energy) that is in her 3rd obedience class. Of course there are days when she "rebels" but I just keep on training:) For control on walks you can also use the easy walk harness...I have a golden retriever that walks wonderfully when he has this harness on..no pulling or lunging!! I've had it easy with biting, teething and all the puppy stuff. Mine doesn't bite like a puppy does and she doesn't chew on anything other then her toys, but I really believe that the obedience classes make for a better pup all the way around!!
 

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Like everything else in life, this too shall pass. Several things can be done in the meantime. Continue on with training. Buy a flirtpole or make one yourself to help tire the dog out. Play fetch with your dog. These two exercises can be done even with your bad knees. Have a family member walk the dog to help tire your dog out. Teach the dog to walk on a treadmill. If you became friends with someone from class have them come over for a playdate with your dog or go to their house. Check out a doggy day care and take your pup there a couple of times a week. Good luck!
 

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I too have a labradoodle. She is the smartest and slyest dog I have ever had. And she goes through rebelish stages. I think I have finally figured how she thinks...and I can actually see her thinking of what to do next...lol. It seems to me that she is determined not to be taken for granted. If I quit commenting on how good she is to pee outside, she will start having accidents. If I quit telling her how good she is to not chew socks...she will find one and chew it right in front of me. If I don't give lots of praise while playing fetch, she pretends she does not know how to do it. etc. etc....lol. We got her at 10 months old and she is now two and a half. Believe me, there is never a dull moment with her, but it is so much fun to find ways to outsmart her...I think she loves that game. The thing with her stages is that they start on a dime, and when I least expect it, they will stop, and all is good again....for a while. Wait for the stage to come to an end, and love every minute with her.
 
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