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I am probably getting a little anxious on my question asking, but while I am at work I tend to just over analyze my puppy's actions. And that gets me on here.

I did followed the thread about -(It's basically just putting your hand out with food and rewarding the dog for not eating it until rewarded. Same with dropping food on ground) My dog suprisingly picked up on it pretty quick. (5 month collie mix, ive had him 2 weeks from humane society)

My question is.... now I am teaching him the basics, and during "stay" it seems like he won't react to my release word. My first thought was that the It's yer choice game has taught him that standing still or laying down will always be the right thing to do. But with stay and then OK!, I want him to run to me for the treat.

Do these 2 excercises conflict?
 

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This is just what I do, but when I'm working on stay, I tell him stay, walk back a bit, stand there for a little while, then walk back to him, then reward, then release. what you're describing sounds like my version of sit, stay....come. I'm not sure if the 2 exercises conflict though because I've never done the game your speaking of, I don't think.
 

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However, anytime I release my dog from doing something, he usually just sits there. He prefers not to move, but he knows I've released him (at least I hope he does :eek:)
 

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Some dogs are always 1 nanogram of adrenaline away from breaking "stay", while others will take a nap if put on an extended down-stay. Some dogs lack confidence and will stick with the thing that they know gains your approval. A lot of dogs refuse to leave your side once they learn "heel".

I always like to lure a dog into movement after giving the release word. Whether that means throwing a treat, a tennis ball, or shaking a tug-toy is up to you and what works for your dog. Another consideration is to balance your training routine so as not to focus too much on one command. Spend too much time working on a particular command can make it a default behavior, and he'll exhibit it anytime he's feeling confused or unsure.
 
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