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Discussion Starter #1
Yesterday was our 10-week-old male cavachon's first day with us. Simon did fine, you know, for a puppy.

The problem is our six-year-old adopted Boston Terrier, Mitsy. We adopted her about two years ago, and we don't think she was socialized much with dogs, because she freaks out around them. There's the general sniffing, etc, but soon she gets aggressive and tries to bite at the other dog(s).

Well, we bring Simon home yesteday and she sniffs all over him, and then, yep, tries to snap at him. We put Simon in his crate, and even then, she couldn't leave him alone, staring and sniffing at him. So, we put her on the chain, and through constant monitoring and correction, by the end of the evening, she was able to sit and lie down in the same room as him.

Then, this morning, same thing. She's so stressed and shaking all over. Does anyone have any tips for helping us to get her over this?
 

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Yeah.

Quit correcting her. Right now, you've taught her that the puppy = getting aggressed at by YOU. She's the resident dog, introductions should really have been made o nneutral ground. Spend time with her while he's crated or behind a babygate, and let them get to know each other through that, first.
 

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and, on top of what Dogstar said, praise, PRAISE,PRAISE the good behavior w/ her....when she's being good while sniffing noses, etc., thru the gate/crate, tell her she's a good girl and give her treats (yummy ones like chicken, cheese bits, etc.).....lay off the negative and the leash (that just makes any dog worse...restriction)
 

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The puppy should be kept separate most of the time anyway so that it's main bonding is to you. Times together should be short, scheduled and supervised but unless the older dog actually tries to hurt, not just correct with a growl or snap, the puppy you should not interfere as the pup needs to learn it's place. As the dog parent of course, if you think the older dog is being a bit too rough or pup a bit too bothersome, you should step in and separate them.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
That's my concern. Mitsy's aggression seems to go above and beyond the typical getting-to-know-you behavior. She gets very physical, and difficult to calm her down.
We are going to try putting up a gate between two of our main rooms, and let the puppy have one side and the dog have the other.
 
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