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So let me get this straight, they "buy" the puppy mill dogs from the mill in order to "rescue" them? I'm about to puke thinking about all the mills that have this "rescue" on speed dial.
 

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Basically, they're a broker. They buy the puppies that were not good enough for sale at a pet store from the puppy mills (with really obvious health problems) and 'adopt' them to you for a discount price that includes spay and neuter.
 

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OMGosh!!! I can understand donations for the shelter ... but $450 to rescue a pup that was from a puppy mill seems a bit high ....

not knowing the history of the parents etc ....
 

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So let me get this straight, they "buy" the puppy mill dogs from the mill in order to "rescue" them? I'm about to puke thinking about all the mills that have this "rescue" on speed dial.
:eek: are you KIDDING me?? so they are basically perpetuating puppy mills...
 

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That first website....a donation secures the puppy you are interested in...what ever happened to a rescue group matching their dogs needs with the right home? Not legit. Sounds like an online pet store, you pay a deposit *cough cough* sorry, donation, and they go buy a puppy for you from a puppymill.
 

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They maybe legit in the technical sense. Charitable organizations can use a substantial amount of their funds for expenses such as salaries for officers, vehicles, fund raising, &etc.... So much so that charitable corporations have become a favorite dodge for some unscrupulous individuals.

I don't know anything about the org in the OP, but that web page gives me the willies.
 

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$400 isn't necessarily completely out ofline for a rescue dog (it's about standard for some breed rescues where a high percentage of the dogs have major medical needs and it'd actually be very low for say, a Frenchie rescue, especially up in the northeast and on the coasts where costs are high.) But this rescue is NTO a reputable one.
 

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$400 isn't necessarily completely out ofline for a rescue dog (it's about standard for some breed rescues where a high percentage of the dogs have major medical needs and it'd actually be very low for say, a Frenchie rescue, especially up in the northeast and on the coasts where costs are high.) But this rescue is NTO a reputable one.
How can I tell which one is or not on Petfinder? Many seem a little strange.
 

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I found this list and it seems pretty comprehensive.
From: http://www.widogrescue.com/whatisrescue.html#reputable
What is "A Reputable Animal Rescue"?

  • A reputable rescue has a contract, screens every potential adopter with a MANDATORY home visit before a pet is placed there, incl. foster/temporary basis and requires references.
  • A reputable rescue follows through on contacts and references and investigates each thing completely.
  • A reputable rescue has references from shelters in their area and works with those shelters.
  • A reputable rescue checks on the care of the previous or current pets with the vet, to ensure future pets will have proper medical attention.
  • A reputable rescue spays/neuters all pets before placement
  • A reputable rescue makes sure animals are up to date on all vaccines, and microchips where appropriate to ensure all pets are healthy, up to date on all shots, heartworm tested/on prevention, and received necessary vet care before placement
  • A reputable rescue always takes its adopted animals back if the placement isn't successful.
  • A reputable rescue keeps animals in foster care, or in situations where the animal was at a shelter, works with shelter staff for a short period of time before placing them, to screen for health or behavior problems.
  • A reputable rescue helps educate new adopters, and may require adopters to participate in training courses to assist in a good adoption.
  • A reputable rescue always returns calls or emails in a timely fashion.
  • A reputable rescue works carefully to match up the right forever home with the right pet, based on the pet's needs/personality/etc.
  • A reputable rescue will help adopters make decisions about which animal is a good fit for their home, and will offer advice and assistance on meeting the correct animal for the adopter.
  • A reputable rescue may ask that all family members and resident pets meet the new animal before an adoption is finalized. Where breed appropriate, several meetings may be required.
  • A reputable rescue will never ask an adopter to take an animal "sight unseen" or take an animal arriving in on a transport right to a new home.
  • A reputable rescue makes an effort to work in harmony with the shelters, humane societies and animal control facilities in their own area or state.
  • A reputable rescue will have a cordial and informed relationship with other rescues.
  • A reputable rescue is not for profit, and works on adoptions, not sales.
  • A reputable rescue takes responsibility for the animals adopted through them for the span of each animal’s life, not "just” for the span of foster care or transport.
  • A reputable rescue carefully screens incoming animals for temperament and health, and has met and interacted with animals being offered for adoption.
  • A reputable rescue does not offer animals to be used for breeding, and should not promote animals with unstable or unknown temperaments.
  • A reputable rescue never places an animal as a surprise to the intended adopter.
  • A reputable rescue never places an animal as a gift to the intended adopter. The rescue will always involve the recipient in the decision to adopt as well as the application, home visit, and selection of the pet.
  • A reputable rescue places the welfare and happiness of the animal first, and screens the homes to ensure that the placement is a sound one for that animal.
  • A reputable rescue will never “hurry up” a process, or waive requirements simply for the convenience of the adopter.
  • A reputable rescue requires an application form and adoption contract.
  • A reputable rescue requires an adoption contract which includes a legal clause to have the pet returned to this rescue if the new adopter relinquishes it.
  • A reputable rescue prioritizes working with shelters and owner-surrenders from within its own state first.​
  • A reputable rescue prioritizes rescue animals from its own geographical area whenever possible (i.e. does NOT haul vanloads of puppies/dogs/pets from out-of-state shelters!)
  • A reputable rescue requires a legal release form for owner surrenders.
  • A reputable rescue understands the limits of its resources; does not accept more animals than it has legal authority or space/time to care for.
  • A reputable rescue is recommended as a "good breed rescue group" by at least two established non-profit shelters in its own state.
  • A reputable rescue operates as an official 501c3 public charity OR as a not-for-profit entity.
 

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The rescue might think they are legit, but IMHO they are NOT.

They are aiding and abetting the Amish puppy mill operations.

I always recommend looking for the organization's 501 (c) 3 registration. That is the IRS filing they make as a non-profit which allows people to make a tax-deductible donation. Most rescues will list it on the homepage of their website, or in the About Us section (it's a 2-digit, 8-digit number like 20-12345678)
 

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Doesn't look legit to me, but I'm no expert.

I have to add, I have seen the norm to be $450-$600 adoption fee for a puppymill ADULT Pug in rescues in New England. They are reputable, and while I fully understand costs are high for them, that amount is the base for a rescue pug in my area and a lot have issues (health / mental / etc).
 

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I agree with all of you; it is not a legit rescue. They are not even a 501c3 non profit.
Yup, I was looking for that as well. Not there. Also, I found it very interesting that the page for volunteers or foster homes are "under construction". Every legit rescue I know needs, and welcomes, all the help they can get help.
Hmmmm, definitely something not right with them.

Jihad
and the pound puppy crew.
 

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What I keep thinking is... what would stop a puppy mill from putting up a front organization like this? They would pretend to be anti-puppy-mills, all the while using it as just another income stream for them. Either way, it all benefits the puppy mills by providing income for the "unwanted" pups and therefore keeps the puppy mills in business........... :(
 

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I WILL NEED TO BE SPAYED OR NEUTERED BECAUSE THERE ARE TOO MANY UNWANTED ANIMALS IN THE WORLD WHO DO NOT HAVE THE CHANCE I HAVE TO LIVE WITH MY OWN FAMILY.
That is a red flag right there. Any reputable rescue would require that a contract be signed for spay and neuter and would include it in the cost. If the pup was old enough they would have already been spayed or neutered.

Also the website talks about puppy mills being USDA certified and how they are inspected. That may be the case but how often are they inspected and we all know about downer cows and how the processing plants were USDA certified but yet the USDA inspections were shotty and no one was around to see that the processing plant was slaughtering downer cows.

So what good is it really for a puppy mill to be USDA certified when there is not enough inspectors to begin with.

The only good puppy mills are the ones that are shut down and never allowed to operate again.
 

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That is a red flag right there. Any reputable rescue would require that a contract be signed for spay and neuter and would include it in the cost. If the pup was old enough they would have already been spayed or neutered.
GREAT POINT. For all that charging top dollar for the supposed "adoption fee," WHY wouldn't spaying/neutering be included? I don't agree with early sp/nt of puppies usually, but reputable rescues do it even though it's not ideal in order to prevent the possibility of even more unwanted puppies being brought into the world. Such a steep fee SHOULD include it. My friend adopted a rescue and paid $100 which included vet visit, spaying, AND microchipping. Totally reasonable... $450 that doesn't include all of that is not reasonable IMO.
 

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I'm surprised at Petfinder....I would think you would have to register and Petfinder Ok them before they could post any adoptions ---

:confused:
 
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