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My little shih tzu loves them, but then learned that they are not good, so i bought some bully sticks instead.
what are your thoughts?
 

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My last dog LOVED his rawhide chews. He didn't get them often, but for Christmas we always gave him a giant stick that he'd carry around the house for a day just showing it off. He never had any problems with the rawhide. But like you, I recently learned that rawhide *can* be hazardous -- depending on the particular rawhide and the dog that is chewing it. Below are a couple links that I found on the subject.

From WebMD Pets:
https://pets.webmd.com/dogs/rawhide-good-or-bad-for-your-dog#1

From the AKC (American Kennel Club):
https://www.akc.org/expert-advice/health/are-rawhide-chews-dangerous-for-dog

Bully sticks are 5 to 10 times more costly than rawhide treats. So, I guess it comes down to paying a lot over time for the bully or taking a chance of possibly paying a lot down the road for surgical removal of a rawhide blockage.

Personally, I plan to take the better safe than sorry route with my next pup. No rawhide. But the pup probably won't see a lot of bully sticks either. Not only are they costly, but they have a horrible odor. What will I use? I don't know. Probably a Nylabone for puppy chewing. But Nylabones aren't edible or digestible either. Raw (not cooked) beef bones are supposed to be good for a dog to chew on but again, they aren't designed to be swallowed.

If I have any solid information to offer, it would be to carefully oversee your pet with whatever chew tool (food or toy) you offer him and take away the chew tool as soon as you realize it may pose a hazard to your pooch.

One thing I've noticed over the past couple of decades is that more and more people are super concerned about what they feed their dogs -- but not always as attentive to the foods and snacks their children are ingesting. :)
 

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After fishing chunks of rawhide from the throats of two different dogs, it is not allowed in my house, period. That said, if you have a dog who only lighly chews, and doesn't try ripping it apart, then it might be okay with supervision. I'd for sure be careful about where it was produced, though.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
I will take a look at those links. He is not a super chewer. I'v tried the Nylabone and he chews it for a minute then moves on to his toys. Would it be wrong if i eliminated all the digestible chew sticks, including the bully sticks? I always thought that dogs loved to chew and needed those sticks.

I wonder if i should try a different Nylabone, like the one below?
https://www.walmart.ca/en/ip/nylabone-puppy-chew-combo-pack/6000030011074
 

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Antlers break teeth. I do not use them. I have one.. it is a "decoration."

Non weight bearing bones are best (neck bones, rib bones but not marrow bones because weight beraring bones break teeth. ). OR you can freeze a raw chicken breast (bones and all ) and give that for them to chew on. A little dog like this I would cleaver it up into smaller sections and then freeze it.

Nyla bones are OK. Kong stuffed with plain yogurt (then frozen) is ok.

Rawhide is indigestible. It can cause blockages and bloat as a result. Deadly stuff.. for sale everywhere. Processed cooked bones in the dog treat section of the pet store are also bad news (they can splinter). I used to use pig ears and hooves.. but the chemical process to make them turned me off.
 

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But the pup probably won't see a lot of bully sticks either. Not only are they costly, but they have a horrible odor.
I haven't noticed a horrible odor from bully sticks. The ones I've gotten have been from Best Bully Sticks, and yes, if you stick your face in the bag and give a big sniff, they do have an odor, but nothing like a tripe twist or a even a fresh kidney (now that was gross). Keeping them in the freezer also helps with any odor.
 

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Lol bully sticks. Still trying to figure out why so expensive considering the part of the bull they come from. I didn't think there was a big market for " that " part.
 

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I watched a video recently on how rawhide is made. I'm never buying it for my dog again. Even beyond the choking danger, the chemical processes used to treat the rawhide are horrifying.

I don't have much experience with bully sticks because I think they're a little...well, weird. But I see them everywhere, so I assume people like them.

Is your dog really into having something to chew? I use these ones for that because they last a while (my dog is a mighty chewer), but I'm sure there are plenty of things like them. I find jerky-like treats in general last a little longer.
 

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Agree with others, Rawhide can be dangerous. Look up how its made. Pretty gross stuff!

My dog loves his Nylabones. I really don't know why, but out of antlers, a pig rib chew thing, and and a different chew toy of unknown origin he will pick the Nylabone for a chew session. Raw bones make excellent chews. And yes, antlers and bones can break teeth, which is why I would not recommend giving those types of chews to very young or senior dogs. Himalyan chews are also a hit here. They are basically really hard cheese, so softer than bones. A big one takes my 50 lb. dog a day or two to destroy. In a couple of chew sessions.
 

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I get frozen marrow bones (also called soup bones) from the local grocery store. They're human grade and cheap, usually a 5 pack is about $3. The only downside is that they can get a little messy if the marrow gets on the carpet. I recommend them if you don't have a power chewer who will splinter the bones (although I've never seen Mesa break one).
 

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Non weight bearing bones are best (neck bones, rib bones but not marrow bones because weight beraring bones break teeth. ). OR you can freeze a raw chicken breast (bones and all ) and give that for them to chew on. A little dog like this I would cleaver it up into smaller sections and then freeze it.
I recently read an article that promoted feeding dogs raw chicken, including the bones. I was shocked. I had always been taught that chicken bones could cause life-threatening problems. I always assumed it had something to do with them being small and sharp. Even now that I know it's okay, I'm not sure that I will be able to give a dog raw chicken with a bone in it. Old habits die hard.

I didn't know about the teeth breakage thing either. I knew cooked bones were a no-no, but I thought marrow bones were a healthy choice mainly for that marrow inside.

Himalyan chews are also a hit here. They are basically really hard cheese, so softer than bones. A big one takes my 50 lb. dog a day or two to destroy. In a couple of chew sessions.
I had never heard of these. I just looked them up. Costly sticks. But I do like the idea of my dog gnawing on hard cheese. I saw a rating that showed them to be not as hard as antlers but harder than bully sticks. Do you think they'd be OK for a teething pup or should the Himalyan sticks be only for adult dogs?
 

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I am the same as oldNgray, grew up being told to never feed chicken bones to dogs whether they were cooked or not. Bought some turkey necks one time for my big dog but then noticed some blood in her stool afterward. I get the marrow bones occasionally but find some of my dogs get really loose stool unless I take most of the marrow out first. They do seem to keep chewing on them even when all the marrow is gone from them. I have several lying around both inside and out and nobody ever fights over them.
 

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It definitely weirded me out the first few times I handed over a raw "hunk o' beast" (chicken leg quarter) with the bones still in it, and had to listen to the crunching. Good grief, the CRUNCHING. It's something that experienced prey model raw feeders don't seem to warn newbies about....

Supposedly, raw poultry bones aren't as brittle as cooked poultry bones. I know people who have fed raw for years, including poultry bones with no issues. I quit doing it simply because I found it to be too time consuming and I've only got one freezer, which also needs to hold people food.
 

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I recently read an article that promoted feeding dogs raw chicken, including the bones. I was shocked. I had always been taught that chicken bones could cause life-threatening problems. I always assumed it had something to do with them being small and sharp. Even now that I know it's okay, I'm not sure that I will be able to give a dog raw chicken with a bone in it. Old habits die hard.

I didn't know about the teeth breakage thing either. I knew cooked bones were a no-no, but I thought marrow bones were a healthy choice mainly for that marrow inside.



I had never heard of these. I just looked them up. Costly sticks. But I do like the idea of my dog gnawing on hard cheese. I saw a rating that showed them to be not as hard as antlers but harder than bully sticks. Do you think they'd be OK for a teething pup or should the Himalyan sticks be only for adult dogs?
I think it would probably be okay for a teenage puppy. I don't think I would give a bitty puppy a himalayan chew. And, it is cheese, so start small to avoid stomach upsets!
 
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