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Discussion Starter #1
So I have an 8 week old cocker spaniel lab mix puppy. I have been working on his training, trying to teach him not to beg, to get on the couch, and to sit. I feel bad because I feel like I have to correct him a lot, by pulling him down (gently) or by telling him no. I know that he is just a baby and thats part of why I feel bad for correcting him over and over again, will he hate me? i want him to have fun and be happy and I can't help but feel like the bad guy :( and that he wont love me/like me.
 

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Rather than telling him 'no' all the time, set him up for success. If you don't want him on the couch, sit on the floor with him. He's too young to be jumping up and down off the couch at this point anyway. If you want him on the couch pick him up and hold him on your lap, then put him back on the floor. Use the crate for times when he's begging or just ignore him, he'll soon figure out he's not getting anything. Or give him a stuffed kong at your mealtimes so he's busy. Use food right in front of his nose to teach 'sit' and so on, don't expect him to know that yet. Keep repeating things like sit with food for a few weeks, then start to phase out the food once he can do it in all sorts of places and situations.
 

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Bordermom gives good advice. It's a million times easier to show a dog what you want as opposed to what you don't want. Train a down command using treats, you don't have to correct at all. Check out kikopup on youtube to learn some positive training tools. You shouldn't push a dog's hindquarters down to train sit, and 8 weeks is far too young to expect a reliable sit. Or a reliable anything, really.

You'll have this dog 15 years, hopefully. You don't need to fit everything in today. It'll be many months before your dog is trained, just relax, bond with your puppy and enjoy him.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I do show him what I want him to do, and I don't always say no, most of the time I use the SHHHH that Cesar Uses. I don't really like cesars other things but that seems to get my dogs attention. i dont push him down to sit either. He has plenty of toys to keep him busy but for some reason he is obsessed with hamburger.
 

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Your puppy will not hate you. Feed it every day, don't abuse it and your puppy will always love you.
Corrections and stuff like that are normal, even among dogs. They correct each other.
 

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And then the dog will skip the growling and go straight for the bite.
 

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Cesar Milan trains that sound using an e-collar. He does the sound, then zaps the dog. No wonder they pay attention when he does it.

It might work to get your puppy's attention now, but pretty soon the dog will learn to ignore it, unless you use punishment like CM does. You're much better off teaching the puppy its name. Say the puppy's name in a happy voice, then give a treat or play with it or run the opposite way. Also, try to minimise the unwanted behaviour by keeping doors closed and things off the floor. Reward the puppy when she does the right thing, like playing with her own toys.

If you don't want her on the couch, teach her to go to her own bed on command. Again, use treats. If the puppy associates being on her bed with treats, she will WANT to be there, and you don't have to force her to do anything.
 

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This is my advice and how I train ..........

Teaching your puppy the things you "want" him to do is the key. The first thing I teach a puppy is recall and "sit". I purposely use treats and every time I call him I have a reward waiting and a good pat or a belly rub or a back scratch ... you get what I mean. :) This way your puppy "wants" to come to you and understands that coming to you when called is rewarding and this makes you the "good" person you are striving to be. If you correct your puppy all the time he will become numb to all the "no's" and just ignore you anyways. There is no reward in "No" .......

Use positive methods and you will have one happy puppy and one great adult dog. Just teach him the things you "want" him to do. Example: If you don't want him on the couch ... place him on the floor ... and say "Good!" or "Down" or whatever word you choose to use ... and give him a small treat. He is going to respond to kindness and positive methods before he will negativity. He will "want" to please you.

Puppies take much time and patience. Eventually you will have the dog of your dreams with time, love, and lots of patience and training. :)
 

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The advice being put forth here is incorrect, at least by implication. That wrong idea is that a dog CAN'T learn NOT to do something.

Not true! Dog's learn NOT to do things all the time. Often, they learn those on their own not from any teaching that we do. But our teachinga negative will be much more effective if it is coupled with a positive behavior. In other words, DON'T DO THIS AND DO THAT.

To the OP: if your pup jumps on the couch and you don't want him there, the first thing is to correct him by removing him from the couch. DON"T SAY ANYTHING at first - just remove him. After you remove him, play a game or do some other training. For a while, it MAY seem like nothing is happening. Sometimes, the pup starts to offer the 'off the couch' behavior on his own. If that happens, say something pleasantly like "GOOD OFF"" and reward. If that doesn't happen, don't worry - you've still establihed the behavior. After a while, as you remove him - or as he removes himself - say "OFF" in a firm but not loud voice - make a disapproving face as you say it. When he has all four feet on the ground, say in a pleasant voice "GOOD OFF" and reward. Then go on to a game or other activity that he likes. We use the verbal "OFF" for this - but you can use whatever you like.

This is a general approach to use for correcting any behavior that you DON'T want. In this case, the coupled positive behavior is kind of obvious. In other cases - like begging - it is more arbitrary. So you might couple the corrections there with something like a down position. Finally, something like correcting food-stealing may be very hard to couple with a positive, because with some dogs, there is nothing comparable to food.

Notice that we avoid the word "NO". It's not that it is a bad word, it's just that once you start using it, you tend to overuse it for all sorts of things and that confuses your dog.

Another thing. Many dogs - even after they are taught not fo go there when somone is around - go onto (ot into) "forbidden zones" when no one is around. if you want to reinforce that behavior even if you are not there, you will generally have to use some sort of physical barrier or control. Something to keep in mind as your pup gets older.

Finally, your puppy isn't going to hate you.m Just then opposite - he'll love all the attention.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thank you everyone for the advice. My puppy is pretty well behaved and is already learning to sit, he has to sit and be calm to get attention first, sit and be calm to get his dinner, and so on. I do not discourage growling, he only does it when he is playing tug of war or with his toys, not at any human or my 4 cats. I just wish he would whine less. I ignore him but it doesn't seem to change. Anyways I am doing my best to take in all the advice.
 

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Cesar Milan trains that sound using an e-collar. He does the sound, then zaps the dog. No wonder they pay attention when he does it.
Yeah... I've heard some pretty crazy stuff about Cesar but I've never seen or heard of him teaching the sound, I've seen him use the e-collar, but never to teach the sound, but to correct a behavior. Just because you disagree with his methods ,and I believe his methods should only be used a last resort, not for basic obedience, doesn't mean you have to make up stuff. I don't believe in making a person seem like a monster, for no reason. If you have actual proof him training specifically the sound then I'd love to see it.

Silentgirl490 said:
Thank you everyone for the advice. My puppy is pretty well behaved and is already learning to sit, he has to sit and be calm to get attention first, sit and be calm to get his dinner, and so on. I do not discourage growling, he only does it when he is playing tug of war or with his toys, not at any human or my 4 cats. I just wish he would whine less. I ignore him but it doesn't seem to change. Anyways I am doing my best to take in all the advice.
He's probably whining because he wants to play, puppies love to wrestle and play and do all that kind of stuff. Most puppies bark and whine when they want to play. Once he's tired he'll be very quiet and probably have to sleep for a few hours. Play growling isn't a big deal, plenty of dogs do it, just to show how much they are getting into playing. If he ever growls at a person, then that would be something to address.
Keep up with rewarding your pup for being calm, it'll definitely help once your pup gets older, and remember to take your puppy everywhere you can, to give him tons of socialization with people, and to new and different surroundings. The more socialized he is the calmer he'll be around people and different situations.
 

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Don't worry about your dog hating you!! In the long run, dogs will love you far more if you can provide a balanced, calm environment for them, and part of that includes discipline! Your pup will be much happier if it learns the rules, and knows that it is following them - its like children in that respect - they may seem happier in the short term if you let them run around like little tornadoes and eat fruit roll ups at 2am, but they will be much happier in the long run with rules and boundaries, even if there is some door-slamming in between.

Unless you are starving, beating or ignoring your dog, he won't hate you. Dogs are incredibly loving, and it takes a LOT to get a dog to hate.
 
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