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I have done some research online and I have found mixed answers. I have an adorable yorkie/teacup poodle mix, Lola, she will be three years old this July and weighs about five pounds. I have been thinking about breeding her, but I am afraid for her safety. I couldn't live with myself if anything happened to her. Has anyone bred a dog this small? Was it safe? Should I breed her?
 

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Why would you want to breed a mixed breed? With the "rescue a pet, save a life" sig, one would think that you wouldn't want to add to the number of mixed breeds out there competing for a home. There are, of course, extra risks in breeding very small dogs. If you don't that you can risk her, you'd be be better off having her spayed and just enjoy her companionship.
 

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If you want an honest opinion, it's not safe nor necessary for a dog of that size to breed. The smaller a dog is, generally the more complications during the birthing process. A dog that size may need a c-section. You need to ask yourself, why do I want to breed her? Dogs do not want to get pregnant, they are simply driven to breed because of over-powering hormones that cause them discomfort if they don't breed. They aren't like humans, they don't all 'want children' at some point. That's not important to them. Frankly, there are already too many puppies and dogs in this country that are being put to sleep every day because there aren't enough homes to go around, so why put more puppies into the mix?
The healthiest, kindest, and morally best thing to do is to never breed your pup, and get her spayed to prevent uncomfortable heat cycles and help prevent certain illnesses and cancers that come with un-spayed females. It's your choice, of course, but like I said... Unless you're wanting to make money off of the puppies, (which is definitely the worst reason to breed) I don't see a good reason to breed your dog and put her in danger like that. :3
 

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I'm not necessarily against mixed breed breeding, providing it's done responsibly, BUT:

Have you performed all necessary genetic health tests (NOT a vet check up) to ensure that your dog is free of all potential hereditary diseases in both breeds that she is mixed with? Do you have money set aside in case a c-section is required (not uncommon in small breeds)? Are you prepared to provide a minimum 3 year written health guarantee to your puppy's new owners, and are you prepared to take any and all of them back at any time if their owners can no longer care for them?

If you can not answer yes to each and every one of these questions, than no, you should not be breeding your pup, regardless of her size. Please get your little girl spayed.
 

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Why do you want to breed? Honestly, I would discourage ANYONE from breeding unless they are seriously taking it on as a career - and then only as a truly responsible breeder....and frankly, I still don't see the need for any more breeders in the world right now!!!
 

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My, that's an odd signature for someone who wants to breed.
 

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I have done some research online and I have found mixed answers. I have an adorable yorkie/teacup poodle mix, Lola, she will be three years old this July and weighs about five pounds. I have been thinking about breeding her, but I am afraid for her safety. I couldn't live with myself if anything happened to her. Has anyone bred a dog this small? Was it safe? Should I breed her?
Pregnancy is dangerous. Emergencies happen, expensive medical intervention is required and there is no guarantee you'll leave the vets office with mom or pups.
 

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One of my dogs came from a litter who's mom died from complications when they were three weeks old. She had a uterine tear, and continued to bleed. After a.vet check, who wasn't concerned, she went downhill fast. They couldn't save her even with surgery and transfusions. This was a 60 lb dog.

There can be many complications with breeding, pregnancy, and delivery. Even if you were producing top working dogs that are saving lives, world champion show dogs, or service dogs making everyday life possible for disabled people, you still have to weigh the risks when breeding.
 

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For the sake of your bitch, the dog population and your bitches phantom puppies, please do not breed her. Not only is it not safe, it's irresponsible.

You have a mixed breed dog that I assume is not competing in any sort of sport, and therefore has no other purpose other than being a pet. Breeding her wouldn't prove anything, it would not be bettering a breed. It would be irresponsibly bringing more dogs into a world that's already full of them. She is not going to miss not having puppies.
Do as your signature says if you want more dogs; Rescue a Pet, Save a Life
 

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There are a plenty of reasons not to breed her -- but since your primary concern is something happening to your dog, then yes, she could die if you breed her. If you aren't willing to take that risk, then don't breed her.

Also, your signature is hypocritical.
 

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For the sake of your bitch, the dog population and your bitches phantom puppies, please do not breed her. Not only is it not safe, it's irresponsible.

You have a mixed breed dog that I assume is not competing in any sort of sport, and therefore has no other purpose other than being a pet. Breeding her wouldn't prove anything, it would not be bettering a breed. It would be irresponsibly bringing more dogs into a world that's already full of them. She is not going to miss not having puppies.
Do as your signature says if you want more dogs; Rescue a Pet, Save a Life
Why would you assume a mixed breed is not competing in any sort of sport?? Many do these days. I probably am a bit of a heretic in that I don't think competing in some general sports (obedience, agility, rally, etc) is a proof of breedworthiness. I think actual working trials - and to some extent, conformation, may be. But are not the only considerations - health and temperament are equally important.
 

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Why would you assume a mixed breed is not competing in any sort of sport??
I assumed this particular dog isn't. I know very well that mixed breeds hold their own, and even excel, above purebred dogs in sports and work.
And if the dog is actually participating in something, and titled in it, then I am by all means open to correction on that.

~~~
Correction, they CAN, SOMETIMES, excel above INDIVIDUAL purebred dogs in sports and work.
 

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Why would you assume a mixed breed is not competing in any sort of sport?? Many do these days. I probably am a bit of a heretic in that I don't think competing in some general sports (obedience, agility, rally, etc) is a proof of breedworthiness. I think actual working trials - and to some extent, conformation, may be. But are not the only considerations - health and temperament are equally important.
You don't often see 5 lb dogs participating in sports. I suppose it's possible, but it's unlikely.

I don't think general sports prove breedworthiness, either. I do think herding dogs should have to prove they can herd and GSDs should have to do Schutzhund (Schutzhund was designed in the first place to see which GSDs were to be bred), but I think conformation is important, as well. Standards must be upheld, and for dogs, physical appearance is part of what differentiates breeds.

All of which is neither here nor there, since this dog is a teacup mixed breed and has no business being bred no matter what she excels at.
 

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I assumed this particular dog isn't. I know very well that mixed breeds hold their own, and even excel, above purebred dogs in sports and work.
at.
sometimes . . . and at some sports. Still, if I'm looking for a performance dog it will probably be purebred (snob, I know)
 

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You don't often see 5 lb dogs participating in sports. I suppose it's possible, but it's unlikely.

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I've known numerous people who have done obedience with Paps, Poms, Maltese, Yorkies and Chihuahuas. I have one friend who has done very well in Freestyle with her Papillions. I've seen agility dogs so tiny that they have to balance themselves at the very edge of the teeter to make it go down (and of course, there's even "Teacup Agility" now)
 

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sometimes . . . and at some sports. Still, if I'm looking for a performance dog it will probably be purebred (snob, I know)
So, first you say I'm assuming no mixed breed can do sports, then you go back and be snide about the fact that they can? o_O Alrighty.
 

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I've known numerous people who have done obedience with Paps, Poms, Maltese, Yorkies and Chihuahuas. I have one friend who has done very well in Freestyle with her Papillions. I've seen agility dogs so tiny that they have to balance themselves at the very edge of the teeter to make it go down (and of course, there's even "Teacup Agility" now)
Okay, I really want to see that. Around here, there's nothing like that.

Man, I live in a sucky place. We don't even have lure coursing.
 

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You're posting in the "first time dog owner" forum asking about breeding your 5-lb pup? I'm really hoping you posted this in the wrong place... Regardless of the breed or the size, I don't think first-time dog owners have any business breeding their dogs... especially not if the only thing you've done is "research on the internet." There are a lot of aspects of being a responsible breeder. For the love of all that is good in the world, get her spayed.
 
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