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I rescued my dog Sadie about a year and a half ago nearly now. I got her from people two hours from me and they barely spoke English, only Russian. They said she ate a cat, never lived in a house, and never had a name. They called her puppy, and she lived in a 6x6x8 fenced area and barely got fed.they explicitly told me to never bring her back no matter what. She is the sweetest dog I’ve ever met, attached to me immediately the moment I met her, and sleeps as close to me as she can every night, if not in the bed under the covers with me. She can be super feisty, fights differently than my other dog, and does this weird howl rather than barking. She doesn’t eat to much and her tail and many other aspects are what I’ve researched of a dingo. They told me she was Australian shepherd husky which is beleivable when you see the photos, but when I search photos of tricolour dingoes, there is some uncanny similarities. I have attached a photo of the dingo I looked up and my dog Sadie. If anyone has any ideas please let me know! :) I am looking at the embark dna test, but wanted to see what anyone else thinks first. Thanks !
Vertebrate Dog Nature Dog breed Carnivore
Dog Carnivore Dog breed Comfort Fawn
 

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Cat-dog, GSD spayed female and Tornado-dog, JRT mix, neutered male
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Many domestic dogs howl rather than bark, huskies included. As for the odds of getting a domestic dog-dingo cross in North America is highly unlikely.

My usual disclaimer: it is almost impossible to determine a dog's mix by appearance, even less so based on one photo; that most mixed dogs consist of three or more breeds; that mixing two breeds together can result in a dog who looks like a third unrelated breed; that not every breed in the mix will show up in the dog's appearance or personality; and that the only way to be sure is to do a dna test.

With that, I'd say your dog looks to have some GSD in him, maybe border collie or husky or cattle dog. I don't see anything that would cause me to guess dingo. And no reason to suspect that in a dog located in Canada (or the US).
 

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It's unlikely, even more so unless you got her in Australia (I see your flag is Canadian). Howling is a very husky-like behavior, as is untrustworthiness around small animals because they have a high prey drive.

I'm no expert, but my understanding of undomesticated x domesticated canine mixes is that the resulting offspring are by no means "the sweetest dog you ever met" and can have some downright undesirable behaviors like being destructive, not getting along with other dogs, and being incredibly independent and aloof, even to their human caretakers!

I think she's likely just a very cute dog who happens to share a few similarities with the appearance of a dingo.
 

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Another vote for "It's highly unlikely". As mentioned, a domestic x wild canid hybrid, especially a high content wild canid, are rarely what most people would consider sweet. Instead, they tend to be very selective and suspicious about people and things, and a lot of their actions are more wild than pet.

Lots of dogs, especially northern breeds, howl. My GSD will howl under the right circumstances.

Your girl looks like she might have some Kelpie or Carolina Dog in her, but even those would be a stretch.
 

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Agree with the above.
And I also thought possibly kelpie when I saw the photo, but as Toedtoes says you really cannot tell much if anything from the dog's appearance. Definitely not dingo, though.

About the howling......my 25 pound white fluffy dog can howl like a wolf when provoked to do so. I don't know how that sound comes out of a small fluffy body! All I have to do is put on a YouTube of a dog or a wolf howling and he is off and going strong. I know a border collie who sings daily. Interestingly enough, neither one howls back at coyotes. I have always wondered why. I think in the case of my dog, he knows they are dangerous and not to draw attention to himself.
 

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I think there is also "howling" and "talking". Huskies are known "talkers". They make a range of vocalizations beyond a standard howl or bark. Beagles and other treers are also talkers. Many small dogs do a more gutteral sound - vaguely similar to a growl, but more of a trill. Basenjis are talkers not barkers.

My Dog-bird used to make a deep call - it was his "checking in with the flock" call. Moose-dog and Bat-dog would hear it and start howling in response. When out camping, etc, other dogs never reacted, but my dogs always did. I think animals understand other animal communications better than we do.
 
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