Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 20 of 38 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I already posted here under introductions, because I felt overwhelmed by the third dog in my life. My husband and I got him two and a half months ago, and he's still a puppy. We moved from Manhattan to Wisconsin this summer, and since we wanted a dog in NY, but couldn't afford it, nor had the space for it, we knew we'd do it as soon as we settle in in Wisconsin. We moved for my job (I'm a researcher and I'm supposed to finish my manuscript - book - in order to keep my career/job going), but my husband also found a job here and he's at work a lot. I work from my home office.

I had (or still have) trouble with housebreaking, biting, and other typical puppy stuff. We live in an apartment. We moved apartments because of the doggie, and now we have a terrace with the real grass patch. This was a life-saver, since it was driving me insane to go up and down the stairs or on the elevator every hour or two.

The doggie was in one daycare that didn't work out, but today he's spending his first day in another daycare that has a webcam service. So, today, I've been logging in to their website to see how he's doing. And whenever I log in, I see him running around, sniffing or playing with other doggies, wagging his tail. Then I think about his day at home with us. My husband walks him and plays with him between 7 and 8.45 am. I start my "shift" at around 10.30 am. I take him out to the terrace grass patch every hour, and play with him for at least 3-4 hours a day. This play can sometimes get exasperating, as he gets overexcited, starts growling and biting, and needs time-outs. Then, I try to take a longer walk with him in the evening. I say, "try," because I have to practically drag him if I want to leave the building courtyard. (He's not into walking around the neighborhood, I have no idea why, nothing bad ever happened.)

I do not neglect him, I would say that I actually feel overwhelmed by his needs, because his presence makes me neglect my work since I constantly feel that the poor little guy is crated and that he wants to come out and pee and play. So I get him out of there every once in a while, even when I don't feel like it or really have other stuff to do. I already missed some conference deadlines and other job-related stuff. If I keep doing it, it can affect my career and our entire lives.

Last week, my husband had to run home from work to calm me down (the doggie caught his head between the crate bars, and emitted the most horrendous screams until I got his head out of there, but that event took me to a breaking point, I thought), and his colleague at work who has a house with a yard and two dogs already said she'd love to have our doggie if we're in over our heads. (He's a beagle, and she lost a beagle to cancer recently.) After the stress over his screaming calmed down, I started thinking that it was insane that I considered giving him to someone when I love him so much already. However, today is making me doubt myself and these decisions again.

I thought that I'd see my pup on the webcam at daycare lie down from fatigue at some points during the day, as some other doggies do. But every time I check in and watch, he's - as I said - running around and playing. They had a 2-hour nap tops, and he's been there since this morning. I CAN NEVER EVER, obviously, provide this much play and activity for him. I also can't have him in daycare every single day (we logistically can't do it, since the daycare is far), plus, it costs 30 bucks a day.

I obviously miss him since I watch him on the webcam, and if I see him interacting with other doggies, I'm worried if he's fine etc. However, I do feel happy when I see he's happy and I can continue with my work stress-free. (The articles that are talking about dogs as stress-reducers now seem like a joke to me. I had two dogs before in my life, and yes, they were reducing my stress and I loved them, but they also added all kinds of other stress, so I think it all evens out in the end.) All this is making me wonder if he'd actually be happier if I were to give him to the colleague who has a house, a yard, and two other hounds. I did ask myself whether I'm secretly wishing for more freedom and trying to justify these thoughts by saying that it would be better for my doggie. Maybe. But I'm ultimately truly concerned with HIS needs.

When he's at the daycare with other doggies, I feel happy because I can see that he's happy. At home, he's happy that way only when I train him and feed him chicken or bacon. Otherwise, he's not into snuggling of any sort - yet - and I feel like when I want to hold him and pet him, he's just annoyed and would rather sniff around freely. So, when I give him affection, I feel that I'm fulfilling my selfish desires and needs to cuddle with a doggie, and not giving him what HE actually wants. Because what he wants is to sniff around and be with other puppies and dogs (he's a beagle).

I don't know what the right thing is anymore and if keeping a single doggie - I can't get another one - in an apartment is ultimately a selfish thing:(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
693 Posts
I have a beagle and they are stubborn as the day is long. I would not get another beagle if someone paid me!

That being said. No one can make the choice for you to keep or give this pup away. That has to be YOUR choice and yours alone. I would work on traning the dog and obedience classes. Figure out a better schedule and re-evaluate in a month.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,911 Posts
After reading your posts, here's what I think - you *can* make it work, with significant pointed effort, training regimens and education on your part. You seem confused about some VERY normal puppy behaviors, so I think it would be good for you to attend puppy classes and to learn/see what normal puppies are actually like and how they mature.

Being as honest as I possibly can be here - judging from your stress level, your impatience with normal puppy behaviors (not wanting to cuddle, saying you have to drag him on walks, the potty training concerns), and the negative effect this situation is having on your work, I do wonder if it would be better for you to re-home him. Which isn't something I say to people often, and I certainly don't say it lightly.

Your reaction to him getting his head caught in the crate bars and him crying because he was scared about it was a big indicator for me that this situation is simply too stressful for you to handle. Being so scared and physically affected that you had to call your husband to come home tells me that a pretty basic puppy occurrence - they get stuck somewhere and get scared - totally pushed you over the edge. Honest truth - at some point, something like that will probably happen again and he will be scared and uncertain and you freaking out on top of him freaking out is not a good situation for either of you.

These difficulties aren't magically going to go away. Right now, my puppy is pretty much only content when I'm playing with him or training him. He sleeps on my lap when he's tired, but that's about it. That's part of puppyhood. Pretty sure another user commented on your previous post that she couldn't pet her hound without getting nipped until he was 8 months old. Maybe your puppy would grow out of nipping faster than that, and maybe he won't.

I think, if you want a low stress, low maintenance dog that you can cuddle with and then leave to its own devices while you do your work, a puppy is pretty much the worst thing you could have added to your home. They're stressful, they're difficult and they're not very rewarding until a significant amount of time and effort is put into them. An adult rescue sounds much more suited to your situation and needs and would likely have less of a negative impact on your stress level.

No one can tell you what to do, at the end of the day. To me, personally, it sounds like the limits of what you can handle stress-wise are falling short of the needs of your puppy and are stretching beyond what you can handle when it comes to your professional career.

Since you know someone who has had Beagles before, has other dogs and could potentially handle the stress of adding a puppy to their daily life, I don't think you should be ashamed to re-home him. I think it's the responsible thing to do if you really feel like you're over your head and can't handle what could be many months more of this type of stress. That being said, if you can do the puppy class thing and work out a better schedule - it does get better eventually. Just months (and maybe even a year) down the road.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Thank you for being honest.

I'm aware that losing it over him getting caught in the crate could be an overreaction. However, just to clarify, I had an older dog before and a puppy (who grew up to be an older dog). NONE of these dogs, nor the dogs I took care of for friends at some points in my life, ever emitted the type of sound our dog created when he got a little stuck in the crate. I thought I knew dogs, but the sound that a small scared beagle (or THIS small scared beagle) could produce was beyond anything I could imagine. Either he, or all small beagles, can produce sounds that I do not think are common. Now that I know that this horrific scream doesn't mean his head is cut off would make me panic less the next time. My husband is a super-relaxed person (as opposed to me, I admit I am more anxious and prone to worry), and he once accidentally stepped on the dog's leash during the walk, and the doggie screamed for a few minutes so loudly, as if he were suffering extreme pain, that people gathered (including other dog owners) to see what happened to him. My husband said that at the first moment he thought that he had somehow killed him by stepping on the leash (which pulled the pup back a little while he ran). He said that he did keep asking colleagues and even clients at work whether he could have harmed the dog (who was completely fine) with the leash-incident, and that he was disturbed by those screams all day. This is just to stress that - as much as I admit that I am an anxious person that tends to overthink and worry - I still think that those screams would be extremely upsetting to almost any human with empathy. I truly didn't think that a dog - or anything or anyone - can scream like that without being extremely injured (and even then). Because of these two incidents, we did conclude that this pup can emit these very scary sounds even if he's just a little scared or panicky about something. (Since he wasn't hurt physically in the least bit neither time, and completely recovered only a few min later - as opposed to us.)

I can also get a stricter schedule, and by that, I mean, I can hopefully learn to discipline myself not to worry about what he's doing all the time and just crate him and be fine with it between playtimes. But is this a happy life for my dog? What I struggle with is: even if I become a calmer owner, or go to the university office and work there between playing with him and walking him, am I ultimately providing this type of a dog with what he needs? I wouldn't be ashamed of giving him to a good person who already has dogs. I'd rather keep him, however, but not if he has to adapt himself to some life that isn't really the best life for him. With my first dog, I was so young, I didn't think too much. The second one was a 4-year-old rescue, some sort of a shepherd mix, and he had a happy life with us. However, I do remember that he got destructive on very few occasions that he was left alone during the day. I didn't think much of it then, but now - since he lived in an apartment with me as well - I wonder if he was also lonely, despite the long walks etc.

I guess I'm wondering not only about this particular puppy-situation that I know will pass, but I wonder if it's moral to keep ONE single dog in an apartment. Especially if that dog is a hunting dog that really thrives on the company of other dogs. With the first dog, I was a child and didn't have the ability to ask those questions. With the rescue, I felt he had a great life, because he would have probably been euthanized (as he was sick with heart worms when I took him), so I never questioned the morality of what I have done. Now, with this little guy and his needs - he definitely SEEMS less people-oriented than shepherd types, for example - I do wonder whether my desire to keep him (regardless of the stress or not) is ultimately selfish. I know no one can answer this for me, but I'm taking your opinions very seriously, as I want to make sure that I don't make a mistake.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Just to clarify further: I never really thought that the breeds are so VERY different (I thought they are different, but that people exaggerate these differences), as my first dog was a cocker spaniel, the second a shepherd mix, and I didn't find caring for them to be much different. They had their personality quirks, I suppose, but ultimately it was all similar. But right now I feel that the only moral situation is: 1) to have "a people-oriented" dog in an apartment 2) to have at least two dogs - preferably in a house - if their personality or breed requires more interesting environments and canine company.

Before we got him, I read a lot about beagles, and it was always written that they can be great apartment dogs if they're provided with enough stimulation and exercise. However, he doesn't seem to be truly happy except when he's with other dogs (or eating something delicious). I guess I wonder whether a scenthound can ever be truly fulfilled in an apartment, regardless of the walks, or whether I'm going to try to MOULD him to be happy with that kind of life.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
721 Posts
I would say that if you are willing to work with him you could make it work. Beagles are not anywhere like cockers, one reason I would never own one-- I have a lot experience and love the breed traits of the ACS to know it would not be a good match. It could be the older he gets the more you two can bond and learn from each other. I am not one that recommends rehoming if the owner is really wanting to try but if it does not work out don't feel bad you are doing what you think is best for both you and the dog.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,765 Posts
Since there is someone who wants him, who is accustomed to Beagle-ness, it wouldn't be terrible if you let her have him. IF you're willing to take him back if it doesn't work out for her. It's not like you're dumping him at a shelter or giving him away to craigslist strangers. When there's a home already lined up. . .I can't get too worked up about it. But if you're just worried about his activity level and puppy training, he WILL grow out of a lot of that. All the Beagles I've known seemed to be decent family pets. Puppies take time and patience, and then more time and patience.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,925 Posts
Beagle puppies are awful.

Most adult beagles are really, really nice dogs - apartment or not. They're not the most biddable and they're inclined to follow their nose and sometimes escape from fenced yards to do so, and aren't dogs I'd trust off leash - but they're sweet, affectionate, adorable, GOOD dogs who rarely have any real temperament issues. (I've had beagles in small spaces and an apartment. Exercise is a thing, for sure, and they ARE stubborn, but seriously. No big deal, IMO)

What you're seeing now? That's just a puppy. My chi mix, my bc and my shepherd? they were all basically exactly the same.

So if you want to rehome, that's okay? But like Willowy said, don't do it because of what you're seeing now or you think you're being unfair. You're not. You've just got a puppy. And one who likes other dogs and that's a good thing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
174 Posts
I totally agree with Hiraeth. When I first saw Beagle/apartment I kind of cringed. Beagles can be very active, howlers and hard to contain a Hunting breed. Rehiring him may be the best thing fir him and you and nothing to be ashamed of. It is obvious you care for this pup a lot unlike some who would just dump him in a Shelter. Perhaps, after you settle in, you could consider rescuing another adult dog of another breed.
I helped with Greyhound Rescue for some years. You want to hear a scream, try a Greyhound. Ours had our neighbor running over here once in her pajamas to see what was wrong with the dog. He had slipped on the wet grass and was fine!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
I think it depends on what you want to do. You are reflecting on the quality of your dog's life and your dog is not. I have a dog that is extremely afraid of men (he was abused before I got him) but I moved in with my boyfriend about 2 years ago. Did this diminish the quality of his life? Would he be better off living with a single female? Yes, definitely. (Although I'm pretty sure he would never choose to leave me for any reason because he thinks the sun shines out of my butt.) Your dog gets some luxuries..my dogs don't get to go to doggy daycare. You do seem somewhat stressed by his general care requirements, which I'm sure makes it difficult to enjoy having him. My bigger dog is pretty low key, but my smaller dog is just a ball of crazy and is always getting herself into a pickle. For her most recent feat, from what I could tell later anyways, she jumped on the roof of a tin shed that we have (over 5 feet...and this is a 30 lb dog) and while jumping down, pulled the metal rim that runs the perimeter of the roof off with her collar so she essentially hung herself, struggled and slashed the pads of her front two feet open so bad that she almost had to have stitches. Well, she should have had stitches, but it was a Friday night so the vet told me not to bring her in unless she was bleeding to death and I couldn't get it stopped. There was blood everywhere, all down the sides of the shed, all over the ground, and all over her. I grew up on a farm and have had to manage some pretty nasty injuries pretty quickly so I was able to wrap her feet and get the bleeding stopped over the next few hours. I was scared and panicked at seeing all the blood she had lost and not knowing if I could get it stopped, but I wasn't really "stressed". The previous time she was at a dead run, playing with another dog, and ran headfirst into a truck hitch and knocked herself out. Would she be stressful for somebody else..probably. It sounds like your dog may be higher energy than you like, which is stressful for you because you feel like you cannot provide for these energy requirements, but your dog isn't thinking that way. He may be bored at times, and like playing with other dogs, but he's not unhappy that he can't do those things as much as he would like..I just don't think dogs think quite like that. As others have mentioned, he will probably grow out of his high level of energy, but maybe he's not the best fit for you either (and I'm mainly saying this because you have someone who seems like they would love to have him). It sounds like you were hoping for a medium to low energy, cuddly dog (which is fine, there are a lot of them out there!) and, on top of that, life got busier than you had anticipated which left even less energy to care for a pet. I think your dog can have a good life either way (he's not wishing he had the ideal life that you've imagined for him), but what about your quality of life. I think I would be pretty miserable if my dogs stressed me out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
This is all so helpful. Thank you so much for taking the time to read and comment. I really appreciate it. I think only other people who have and love dogs can help with this. My friends who "like" dogs, but never had them, or tried once and gave up on them don't even understand why on earth would anyone bother, and they give me 120 reasons as to why having a dog for me is impractical and costly etc. But, as you all know, that's completely not helping, because they just have no idea what this is all about. Because, on paper, of course none of it makes sense. Knowing that I'm stressed out, my mom today on the phone told me that she doesn't understand why, after completing a doctorate, which was stressing me out for 6 years, I'd immediately take a doggie. How I should be thinking about a child, so that there is someone to whom I can leave things, etc. That I should have established myself in my career better, then get a dog again. It all "makes sense," yes. But when I wake up Bobo to pee, and he yawns loudly with that high-pitched yawn and with his stinky breath (which I love), I feel a surge of love and nothing "practical" makes any sense.

Today he was in daycare, and he's tired and happy, and I'm happy for him. I'm definitely willing to go through the puppy-phase with him if one day he can be happy with us in an apartment (maybe one day a house, I have a two-year position here, so I simply don't know yet). At this phase, I think he needs the daycare. I mean, he wouldn't die without it, but he goes pretty insane: I know all puppies are "horrible," but some puppies are worse than others. I was talking to a neighbor from the building yesterday evening who has a dog, and I was saying how Bobo has one of his crazy fits, and he said, oh, he's just a puppy. However, then Bobo started running in these crazy circles around me: basically, I have to hold the leash and turn, and he runs and runs and runs in wide circles around me very fast, his ears stretched out in the air... after that he jumped on the concrete bench and before we knew it, chewed a piece of the concrete off. Then the other dog-owner said: ugh, he really is a little nuts. I don't take this to be an insult to my doggie, of course, I'm just aware that I'm dealing with a hyperactive puppy, even when it comes to puppies. For example, as I said, today I watched him at the daycare on webcam and he's in a room with only puppies, but most of them sit down or lie down at some point; he kept going all day long. They said his energy is relentless, and then he just crashes. I had a cocker spaniel puppy, and, as much as I was a kid, I think my parents, who both worked, would have gone nuts if he had been this energetic. He also didn't chew this much, except for the slippers and shoes, and we didn't have stuff like bitter apple (that is now something I couldn't live with, he tried chewing through drywalls, even while I watch him). But, as I said, if I can believe that he can be happy one day with activity that could be exerted through normal walks, then I'm willing to live with him through this puppy-phase.

I'll do doggie daycare twice a week, because I simply can't afford more than that right now, and that should hopefully be enough. On the other days, I'll just try not to lose my mind over whether he has too much pent-up energy or not. (This is sometimes hard for me: I think I have trouble generally when I see someone needing something not to cater to that need to the point where I completely neglect myself and my own work/meals etc.)

I'll also have to hope that nothing too dramatic will happen. Kristan, I admit right away that I would be in panic if anything like that occurs. I now know that the cries from him can come even if he's not hurt, so I'll try not to freak out over that. But if he does something to himself... I'll just have to hope that it doesn't happen. I wish I could be a little tougher, for both of our sakes. He's a wuss, and I'm a wuss:( So with the two of us combined, he got his head stuck in the crate and we ended up screaming (he) and crying (I). Margot, so you know the screams I'm talking about?? I tried to google screaming dogs, but I couldn't find anything resembling it; the neighbors also thought that he was being ripped to pieces. (Me too, before I got to the crate and "freed" him.)

I would never give him to a shelter. I took a dog from the shelter years ago, and I can't imagine putting one there. I really love him already, despite the stress. In a way, he wouldn't really stress me out if I didn't care. It was a long-awaited doggie in my life, and I would give him to the woman with the house and two hounds only if that's the only way for him to be happy (later in life as well). I spent the last two months either with him or googling how not to mess him up, and have him become a balanced dog. So I'm going to try to find some time for myself too, because otherwise neither of us will be balanced. Since some of you suggest that there are beagles who are doing well in apartments with no other dogs (Willowy and CptJack), that's giving me hope.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
176 Posts
You want to hear a scream, try a Greyhound. Ours had our neighbor running over here once in her pajamas to see what was wrong with the dog. He had slipped on the wet grass and was fine!
I snorted ice tea though my noise when I read this. I show grey's and borzoi.............i swear they can step on a sticker and you'd think that their paw was amputated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
I snorted ice tea though my noise when I read this. I show grey's and borzoi.............i swear they can step on a sticker and you'd think that their paw was amputated.
Hehe, it had me laugh too. He slipped on the wet grass:)))
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,194 Posts
I think your expectations of yourself are incredibly high. The problem isn't the dog, the problem is that you are torturing yourself with worry about how to care for him, when you're already doing a fine job.

Lots of people have dogs and work full time. Mine are home for two 4 hour blocks during the day by themselves. One has free roam of a couple rooms, but the other is crated because she's young. They're fine. They just sleep all day. Even if I'm home, they sleep all day.

Personally I'm not a huge fan of a lot of doggie daycares. I don't think it's productive for a dog to be up and running around non-stop for 8 hours. It can be the sign of a dog who is just a bit frantic and over aroused and can't settle himself down. It's great to play with other dogs, and it's fun for them, but you do not need to emulate that non-stop activity for 8 hours a day in order for him to be happy.

What it comes down to is that you have a lot of anxiety that you are putting onto this dog and your relationship with him. He isn't the issue, and he's perfectly happy and living a great life with you. Keeping a dog in an apartment is not selfish. Having to actually work and ignoring the dog for a few hours a day is not selfish. Or if it is, 99% of dog owners are selfish.

Deal with your own anxiety (maybe see a therapist?) and I think you'll find that the issues with the dog go away. Because ultimately he's not the problem and is happy as a clam.

ETA: I strongly disagree with every person in this thread who said beagles are super high energy and not meant for apartment life. Pretty much any breed can live in an apartment if it is walked and exercised and a beagle is no exception. And I've known many beagles and as adults all were mellow and happy to lie around all day. They are not particularly demanding dogs as far as exercise and training requirements go.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,925 Posts
I think your expectations of yourself are incredibly high. The problem isn't the dog, the problem is that you are torturing yourself with worry about how to care for him, when you're already doing a fine job.

Lots of people have dogs and work full time. Mine are home for two 4 hour blocks during the day by themselves. One has free roam of a couple rooms, but the other is crated because she's young. They're fine. They just sleep all day. Even if I'm home, they sleep all day.

Personally I'm not a huge fan of a lot of doggie daycares. I don't think it's productive for a dog to be up and running around non-stop for 8 hours. It can be the sign of a dog who is just a bit frantic and over aroused and can't settle himself down. It's great to play with other dogs, and it's fun for them, but you do not need to emulate that non-stop activity for 8 hours a day in order for him to be happy.

What it comes down to is that you have a lot of anxiety that you are putting onto this dog and your relationship with him. He isn't the issue, and he's perfectly happy and living a great life with you. Keeping a dog in an apartment is not selfish. Having to actually work and ignoring the dog for a few hours a day is not selfish. Or if it is, 99% of dog owners are selfish.

Deal with your own anxiety (maybe see a therapist?) and I think you'll find that the issues with the dog go away. Because ultimately he's not the problem and is happy as a clam.
Agreed with all of this.

I have a BC. The internet will tell you this dog is an energy machine. No. She gets maybe an hour or two of exercise and training (combined) in a day. That's including the time she spends playing with the other dogs. The rest of the time, she's asleep on the couch or in her crate. She had to be taught to settle down when she was young, yes, and to learn that life was not a 24/7 party, but she learned and she's FINE while I work. Some days? She gets no exercise beyond going potty.

That's just. Life. Work and family and other obligations come up and she's got to sit down and cool her heels the same as the other dogs.

And for the record the zooming around thing? It's just zoomies. Totally normal dog thing and means nothing except WHEE FUN. Or possibly an overly *TIRED* dog who needs to be encouraged to nap by being put in a crate with a kong.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
I have a 9 month old coonhound mix puppy that has a nose, is very food motivated and that we just started considering being housebroken in the past month. She still gets the zoomies (what you describe as "going crazy") when she's really excited and worked up. She still tears apart anything she can get her mouth on. Just last night, she de-stuffed a couch pillow, ripped up 3 paper coasters, and a sticker. Have you tried any interactive toys? Her favorite is this, a ball that we fill with her meal. She has to push it around the house to get the food out. It takes her a good 20-30 minutes to get it all out. She also loves Bully sticks and will chew on one of them for hours at a time. You said you have a terrace, could you dog proof it and let him stay outside for a while on nice days? Penny (my dog) will spend hours on the deck just smelling the air, sunbathing, and watching everything that is going on. Are there any hiking trails near you? From a previous thread, you said you start work around 10:30, perhaps you could take him on a long trail walk in the mornings. Playing and walking around home are good, but you have to remember he is scent hound, and they need new smells. Penny gets more exhausted just driving around in the car than she does on any normal walk. It's because she is constantly smelling everything that is outside. Trail walks are her favorite and I've learned that I just need to let her smell everything and anything possible, she can't actually walk straight for more than a few feet in those locations. But...when we get back, she crashes for hours because she was so worked up with all the smells.

Have you looked into any puppy classes or even nose work classes in your area? It would give you a chance to talk to people going through the same thing as you, and may help you develop friendships in the area as well. The nose work classes could be good metal exercise for your dog as well, and allow him to do something he was bred to do.

My SO likes to say "I just have to remember she is like a very stupid 2 year old, or I would get too worked up about what she does" Penny knows her commands and some special tricks and picked up on them very quickly,but she is still a puppy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,194 Posts
Also, you totally need to read this: http://3lostdogs.com/thinking-of-re...to-the-shelterbreeder-please-read-this-first/

Being overwhelmed by puppies is super common. Lots of people go through what you're going through and come out on the other side with a fantastic adult dog.

ETA: And yeah, running around in circles is the zoomies. My 6 month old does it like 3 times a day. Heck, my adult dog does it most days. Totally normal and it doesn't mean they aren't exercised enough. In many cases it means they're overtired. It's just a puppy thing and they all are like this.

And about the apartment again. I lived in an apartment with my 2-3 year old fairly high energy spaniel for 8 months. He was fine! We walked a couple times a day, he did zoomies in the apartment. Heck, now we're back in my 2,000sqft house, but he really only has access to 2 or 3 rooms most of the time which is no larger than an apartment. We have 10 acres but no fence so he can't go out there alone. He doesn't get any more exercise now in my house with tons of land than he did in that apartment. It's really fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,502 Posts
I agree with over-doing the doggy daycare. It can cause more issues than it solves because the dog is *used* to running and playing and doing whatever all day. There isn't a lot of structure and when the dog is home, it wants to continue that activity. This isn't all dogs of course, but young dogs/puppies can almost become a daycare "addict" if you will.

I took Bella to daycare 3-days a week when she was a pup. When she was home with me, she was always in "daycare mode" and it just took more work to get her to focus on training. She still goes once a week, now. She loves it. Couldn't take it completely away from her :)

So - don't worry about not providing enough daycare - is it fun for him? Absolutely! Is it productive to his learning, calming and becoming a better dog - probably not.

The puppy phase will get better, it takes time and patience as Willowy said. This is true of most every puppy. Taking even just 10 minutes a few times a day to play mind-stimulating or nose-work games is MUCH better than daycare IMO (and mostly free :) ).

ETA: ...and like other's have said, if it comes down to re-homing, don't feel guilty. It sounds like he as a great alternative home available! Most dogs aren't that lucky :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,018 Posts
The daycare situation is a very exciting and overwhelming kind of environment. Think about a bunch of kids at a birthday party. They are WILD, right? And they can go for seemingly forever. But that's not their ideal day for all day every day. With rambunctious young dogs they need some time to let loose but it's okay that he has down time and nap time and structured learning too.

I work full time and my dogs are fine while I'm away to nap.

If the dog is getting an hour or two of real interaction and/or exercise on weekdays plus some little breaks here and there you're probably doing more than okay! You can always do more on weekends. Dogs are kind of lazy creatures, even the high energy ones. Puppies are not but they aren't puppies very long. Teach him to relax and nap some, give him things he can do on his own (like chews or something), do a little training every day, spend some time just hanging out with him, and give him a good few hours a week to run and be really wild and crazy. I like play dates with friends' dogs if I know they get along better than daycare/dog park.

Oh yes and the running in circles is just zoomies. My dogs do them several times a day! It's very normal.

EDIT: I also lived in an apartment with a beagle puppy for a while (not mine, but roomie's) and it was not that bad. She too grew up like all dogs do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,230 Posts
I think it's fine to do daycare once a week but this is the prime time to be teaching and training your puppy. Do daycare for a break FOR YOU, with the added bonus that he gets to socialize and gets tuckered out. He doesn't need to run all day to be a happy dog. The amount of exercise at daycare is to spoil him and give yourself a day to regroup.
On the negative side he could learn some poor behavior at daycare if the people running it aren't the best supervisors/don't know what they're doing it.

I agree with Hiraeth on the whole "Should I rehome him?" question. If this is too much stress, and you're going crazy and it's ACTUALLY going to potentially ruin your career I would rehome him to the family you've already looked into. He sounds like a pretty typical puppy to me. There are easier puppies, but his issues sound a lot like 90% of the puppy problem threads we come across daily.

If you're willing to work with him then you need to relax. It's stressful and frustrating raising a puppy a lot of the time, and we're here for you to vent, but you have to do your best to not let it effect you to the degree it has been. There - unfortunately - probably will be a time in his life that he gets hurt or screams again and you need to mentally prepare yourself for that. If it's any peace of mind you can assemble a puppy first aid kit in preparation for anything that could go wrong. Puppies get into things, are uncoordinated, and chew on things they definitely shouldn't accidents happen.

There's no problem in crating him as long as you're exercising him, giving him toys to occupy himself, and letting him out to pee. Your lifestyle sounds perfectly fine for having a dog in it. There's also no shame in admitting it if he is too much for you, and rehoming him.

ETA: The only reason I'd think a Beagle shouldn't be in an apartment is how loud they definitely can be. Even on Dogs101 (which isn't the end all be all) I'm pretty sure they don't recommend them for Apartment life because they're loud.
My dog also, at almost two years old, has at least 2 episodes of "Zoomies" a day. She doesn't bite or bark, just rips around in a circle while I say, "Go-Go-Go" she'll go for like 10 minutes sometimes. Incorporating toys as she goes.
 
1 - 20 of 38 Posts
Top