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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I use to work at an SPCA I was a vet tech. So I saw my fair share of great dogs get put down because no other reason then their time was up. I also help
save some kittens and dogs too. So I have always said I will only rescue. All my dogs have been pound dogs.

In a year or so we are going to be getting another dog. I really want a Mal pup. I want to do search and rescue training, obidiance, and frisbee. I want a dog I know my dog is healthy. So I would only go to a good breeder one that dose the hip check and breeds healthy sound dogs. Also with pound pup you never know what you are getting puppies change so much. If I had the chance to meet the parents I would have a better idea of what I am getting....

Main reason for me to get a pup is so I can make sure she is well socialized with every one and everything. If I go with a Mal I think this is very important.

So a small part of me wants to try getting a dog from a good breeder. The other part of me is ashamed I would even consider doing such a thing. In the end I'm 90% sure I will get another rescue. Or if I did get a breeder dog i would donate money to a shelter and foster to make up for it.

But is it worth it to get a puppy from a good breeder?
 

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A good breeder does as much to help the world of dogs by health testing, donating blood samples and money to canine genetic research, and often working in rescue themselves that I find it just as ethical to support them as to support a shelter.
 

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Altho I have always had rescues and mutts, and never had a breeder pup, I strongly believe that pups from a GOOD breeder are 'better' (for reasons Keechak wrote, as well as for superior early socialization) and worth the money. When I compare my current dog to breeder pups, I can see that the pups are calmer. However, the owner has to maintain socialization and training to continue the calm, and most don't seem to put in the time.

If you're going to put in all that time for training, I think that you can justify the $500 - $1000 cost of getting a dog with a terrific head start.... make sure that the breeders raise the pups in the house, and understand the training needed to achieve what you want, so that they can support you.
 

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It's up to you to decide whether it's worth it. For me the health testing would be the most important reason, but that being said, you could get an adult dog from a shelter and have it x-rayed to make sure it's structurally sound and be able to do all the same activities. But if those activities are important to you, I would not get a puppy from a shelter. I got Obi from a shelter at 12 weeks and wanted to do agility with him. By the time he was 9 months it was clear that he will never do agility due to having terrible knees.

So if I wanted an adult dog, there is no reason not to get it from a shelter. If I was getting another puppy, I would most likely go with a breeder.
 

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I would say yes, definitely worth it.
Nothing wrong with shelter dogs, and that is great too, but I prefer purebreds out of known parents so I at least know a little bit what I might be able to expect in the health department.
 

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If you're interested, there's a fabulous mal rescue in the states. As far as I know, they have foster parents all over the place and transport dogs whenever needed. I know someone fostering for them right now, and I might be able to put you in touch. Since the dogs are all in foster homes, they are known entities. You could make sure that you adopted one that was well-socialized.
 

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It is certainly worth it if you are looking for a certain dog with certain qualities for a purpose (including sports). You have nothing to feel ashamed of. Dogs from good breeders are not in competition with shelter dogs for homes, and their breeders don't contribute to the shelter issue. Many provide health testing which helps all dogs and work as a safety net for their breed. I have dogs and cats who came from shelters and the streets. I also have dogs who came from breeders (and currently one that I bred) I'm perfectly fine with that. I've done my share for shelter dogs. So have you. Whichever source you choose for your next dog, I'm sure it will be the right dog.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks guys. You are all right. The back yard breeders are adding to the over population of dogs. A good breeder does not just give the dogs away for cheap. They too will make sure you are the right home for their pup.

I have found the Mal rescue. It's hard to find a well socialized Mal thats good with kids. if there is a good one they are gone fast. I know of a breeder that will take in rescue Mals I would check with her when I start looking.

Yes because it is a puppy going to a good breeder makes sense. But for an older dog I have to go with a rescue. I have learned so much about what it takes to make a dog great. Basically you get what you put into a dog. The more time you spend working with the dog the more you get back. Training is something I love to do. I now want a fresh young mind to work with. I have done my share of fixing dogs with baggage. time to raise one to be baggage free. If you know what I mean.

Thanks for Letting me see it in a different light. I have just been so anti breeders for the longest time. Seeing all the dogs in need it never made sense to me why you would no get a rescue. But for a puppy that I have big plans for it does.
 

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There is NOTHING wrong with getting a mixed breed. But it is not some kind of sin to buy a dog from a good breeder. In fact it's really no one's business to judge where anyone gets their dog. If the dog makes the person happy & the dog's happy who is anyone to look down their nose for the choice?

Is it worth it to buy from a breeder? To me it is absolutely yes, is worth it IF I choose the right breeder who breeds for the qualities I need for the job intended for the dog. I've a friend who gave me a lot of crap when I got my livestock guardians. I respect her choice to go to the shelter. I love her dogs. They're a fine bunch but she's had a lot of misery & heartache because of mismatched dogs & jobs. I've got animals on my farm that depend on the steadfast livestock guardian. In fact, if a predator comes up, they'll often run to the LG. I've had chickens run under the dogs when a hawk flies over. My little dogs have done the same when they're uncertain of something. Dogs with jobs need to have the right fit because if their job is one where lives depend on them... it MUST be the right fit.


If I want a mantracker, then I've found it far better to have a pup who comes from excellent trackers & when those parents all came from excellent trackers & so on. It's how I got my livestock guardians, it's how I've had some of the best working dogs who are happy in their work as they are hanging out with me or doing odd jobs on the farm. When a dog is doing work that's really intense, there's no amount of reward or training that will bring them through the worst of it the bond with the handler, the steadiness of training & most importantly is the genetics that gives them strong foundation to build on. It may not be to some folks liking but when my phone would ring & someone needed a person found or evidence found or a lost item of a great deal of importance to them found... the right dog for the job was the thing that mattered. Especially when it comes to SAR work, if the dog isn't put together for all that comes with the intended job... it's not fair to the dog or the handler or the people you want to help.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I have always thought that if you need a dog to get a job done then getting the breed you need from a good breeder is fine. For most people that just want a nice family dog or companion they I think one should check the pound first.

With so many people losing homes still.Tthe shelters here are way over stocked and even no kill shelters are starting to concider putting down dogs because if lack of space. Knowing that makes it so hard to think about getting a breeder puppy. I still hVe time to think it over.
 

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Quite frankly, if I wanted a breed like a Mal, I would find a really great breeder. Especially if you have your heart set on doing the things you want to do.

You don't have to make up for any thing. There is nothing wrong with getting a dog from an ethical breeder. I have all rescue and work in rescue and I still plan on purchasing from a breeder. Probably my next dog, whenever that may be.
 

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I always thought I would get a shelter/rescue dog vs. a purebred. But last year when I was finally able to get my own, getting a puppy from a breeder wa the only thing that made sense for my situation. I was living with my parents but planning to move out within 6 months. There are limited numbers of apartments in my area that allow dogs at all, let alone large breed dogs. I figured I would have a better chance of avoiding problem behaviors that would cause issues in an apartment if I raised my own puppy, rather than taking in a dog with unknown history/prior behavior issues. I spent more time researching dog breeds and breeders than I spent looking for a job. I got my dog from a breeder who will sell 1-2 pups per litter on breeder agreements, pending health testing. Allotted dogs were sold as pet qualityand had to be neutered/spayed. He is a great dog and I love the breed, but I think my next sog will be a rescue, when I have a house, a backyard, and hopefully some help. Getting a bred dog was the only way I thought I could garantee that my dog would never end up in a shelter.
 

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We thought of looking for a shelter dog, but decided on a breeder. Our previous dog was a pet shop dog and she came with lifelong physical issues - bad overbite (one side of her mouth looked like a bulldog's), tear staining, shoulder problems which started giving her discomfort before she was a year old with periodic limping and soreness her entire life. As a puppy, she came to us with Giardia. Of course, she was just as much loved and cared for as the finest show dog. When we were looking for a new pup, we decided on a breeder. We were mainly interested in health. I did my research and picked a small breeder of show dogs. I researched the parents' lineages. My pups ancestry is impeccable. The best kennels in the country and bred from UKC and AKC champions and grand champions. My breeder does the proper health testing on the breeding dogs. She raises the puppies in her home. Kodi came home clean, free of parasites, and healthy. Although we were maintly interested in a healthy dog, we also wound up with a potential show champion (even though we have no intentions of showing).
 

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I believe choosing a good breeder is a MUST , both in terms of good health as well as character. For some breeds however it might not be all that easy to find a good breeder.
Good luck !
 

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I don't think there's anything wrong with someone who wants "just a pet" going to a breeder, either. If what you're looking for is a "big, spitz-type dog," then by all means, go to a shelter and check out all of the spitz mixes. But if you specifically want a malamute and you want to make sure it's as healthy as possible, and you want that life-long relationship with the breeder, and you want to know that your dog could always go back to the breeder if something happened to you, and you want to have a good idea of your dog's future size, temperament and health, then buy from a good breeder.

My family's first dog was a rescue (a purebred Samoyed that was too much for her owners to handle; they left her tied in the yard all day, barking her head off). My second dog was a lovely malamute/collie mix who came from a farm here on PEI and cost me all of $75. When he was gone, I wanted something very specific -- an intelligent, trainable, easy-to-groom, non-barky, non-aggressive, energetic, healthy dog that would be small enough to fit under an airplane seat so I could take it on vacations or easily take it with me if I moved cross-country. I did tons of research and found that a papillon hit every single point on my list, plus I really liked how they looked. My chances of finding a papillon in a shelter or even in rescue around here were virtually nil, so I went to an awesome breeder, and I have not been sorry. Crystal is exactly what I wanted in a dog, and she has not had a single health issue since I got her (she's now almost five). I am also now friends with her breeder; we talk a lot and hang out together at shows. I've learned a lot about dogs and showing from her and I'll still talk to her long after Crystal's gone (I'll most likely get another pap from her if she's still breeding when that happens).

With Casper... well, I wanted a small husky. I've always liked spitz-type dogs (my first two dogs were that type, after all), and knew I could deal with the temperament and any prey drive issues. I live in the city and I didn't feel I had the space or the energy level for a regular-sized husky, so I went with an AKK. Absolutely no chance of finding one in rescue anywhere around here (the nearest breeder is more than a thousand miles away), so again, went with a good breeder.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I still find it very hard to decide. My first dog was from the pound lived to be 16yr was the best dog ever never had health problems. I now have a rescue pit bull who is maybe 10 and has very very bad elbows. He has been a good dog but. I can't not help but remember that for every puppy you buy 1,000 puppies die. I want a Mal pup but don't know if I need one. I got time to really think it all over.

I love hearing all your ideas thanks.
 

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I can't not help but remember that for every puppy you buy 1,000 puppies die.
What? That makes no sense at all. Even if you believe that buying a dog take a home away from a shelter dog, then still only one shelter dog would die, not 1,000. And jeez, if that were true, that would mean 5 billion dogs are being killed in shelters in the U.S. every year (figuring that about 5 million dogs are purchased every year). Can you explain how you came by that figure?
 

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Beckster, you didn't say what breed you picked. Pictures please!
I got a Shiloh Shepherd. I picked that breed because they have the shepherd look/temperament that I love, but generally have much softer temperaments (a lower work drive means less chewed shoes for me!). Also as a developing breed the breeders are incredibly careful about their breeding practices. I am pretty sure it is impossible to find a backyard-bred Shiloh.






 
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