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We keep our dogs' crates downstairs in our kitchen. The dogs go in their crates when we're not home, when they're eating and if they need a "time out." Both are fine with going in their crates and neither has ever had a bad experience with the crate to my knowledge.

We let both dogs sleep in our room. Colby is usually at the foot of our bed and Ace sleeps next to his dog bed on the floor. It's kind of hilarious:


I digress, I've noticed that both of them throw absolute fits if I tell them to get into their crates at night when they know my fiance and I are going to sleep. Let me clarify: they go in happily, but then realize I'm going to bed and that's when they start barking. I don't let them out while they're barking, but by the same token I feel bad for my neighbors when they are barking and carrying on at 10 or 11pm. So far I don't let them out until they've settled down and some nights I don't let them out. This is assuming they've gone potty. They settle down eventually, but I'm starting to get a little frustrated with the behavior.

Do you think it's possible that they feel like they have a "right" to be out of their crates at night or do you think it's a matter of wanting to be with us while we sleep or maybe they're just used to sleeping upstairs? Funny -- how quickly they get used to those luxuries! I like when they sleep with us, but some nights I just want some time off, which is why the crates aren't in our room to begin with. Any advice?
 

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What's your definition of entitlement? My definition is basically that something is expected, the expectation has been set and the dog believes it has every right to it.

Websters says... a belief that one is deserving of or entitled to certain privileges

If so then dogs can most definitely feel entitled, and mine feels she's entitled to a number things.. ;)
 

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To some extent for your situations yes they do. You established the routine of them getting to sleep in your room and dogs like routine. Now you are trying to change it and they aren't happy about it, their expectation is that you'll maintain the normal routine. If there are some nights you just don't want them in the room that's your choice and if you continue to switch it up some nights with you, some times in the crate they'll eventually accept that as the norm. But my guess is if you want to do that you have to stick to it, as in if you decide to crate them for the night you can't change your mind about it when they put up a fuss (even waiting for them to settle first).
 

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Personally I think they want to be with you. If you let them before and they can't now, they may think it's not fair. Are they quiet when they're with you two? The only time Luke isn't allowed the whole house is when I leave. Then he's only allowed the downstairs and I put the baby gate near the steps. But other than that he sleeps in my room, on my brother's bed actually (I have yet to tell my brother that, shh...)

If you want them in, I see no reason not to let them in. I think dogs just like to be with us and when they're separated they put up a fit. But if you don't want it, stick to your guns and they'll stop barking eventually and get the hint.
 

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A sense of entitlement the way humans experience that? No, I don't think so.

Being upset because expected routine has been broken? That's very much a dog thing. Dogs like routine and take change very poorly, plus, a bed is a much more comfortable sleeping spot than a crate.

Also, cute puppy belly! :)
 

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A sense of entitlement the way humans experience that? No, I don't think so.

Being upset because expected routine has been broken? That's very much a dog thing. Dogs like routine and take change very poorly, plus, a bed is a much more comfortable sleeping spot than a crate.

Also, cute puppy belly! :)
I totally agree. Entitlement give the impression of being deserving of the activity. I don't believe that comes into play. I think it's just that the routine is different.
 
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