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Hey guys. So it seems like everyone is against using an invisible fence. but i think in my case it would be at least worth a try, right? So I have 1.5 acres. The whole thing is fence with 3 strand electric wire horse fence. For the most part, the dogs stay in the electric fence. Every now and then they will slip under t and kinda wander off. So my issue isn't with them bolting through it. I'm considering an invisible fence just to keep them from wandering off. The actual electric fence is still somewhat of a visual barrier for them and they dare not touch it. Does anyone have any positive experiences with invisible fence?
 

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No, not really. If your dogs still slip under and wander off with the visual barrier of the horse fence, they will probably still go through the shock of an invisible fence. If they see a deer on the other side and want to chase, they may run right through the shock, and then not want to cross that line again back into your yard.

Additionally, if your dog happens to get shocked while they're, say, playing with you or another dog, they may decide that you or the other dog are the bad thing and become fearful, or perhaps lash out aggressively in their fear and confusion.

A physical fence is always the most reliable solution.
 

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I think an invisible fence inside a physical fence is a good thing as long as you do the training that goes with an invisible (there IS a training curve with this product).

The ISSUE I have with invisible fences as the only fencing is that other dogs and threats can come in while the dog with the collar cannot go out. I would not want to put my dog in that situation (threats can come in but he/she cannot go out). The other issue is if you have more than one dog they can play and get a canine hooked in a collar and disaster can ensue. I never have collars on my dogs and I never let them together so it does not apply to me.. but it would if I had dogs out together.

If I had a physical fence and a dog that would breach that fence (I have known dogs that would climb out of anything, including a 6 foot stockade fence with wire on top) I would look at putting an invisible fence inside the physical fence to keep them OFF the physical fence. This is pretty much what you are doing.

As far as the dog and fear and running through etc. there is TRAINING involved in using an invisible fence. You have to train for it and follow those directions.
 

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We had one several years ago.....dog does have to be trained to it. The one we had beeped when dog got close as a warning then gave zaps if dog got closer. Was not continuous shock. More like cattle fencing does with the pulses of voltage. Didnt work for the german shepherd we had at the time. Only took a couple of weeks for him to start not giving a crap about it. Would literally be walking on top of the wire getting zapped. Didnt care. Would flick his ears every so often but no more than that. May work better with a dog with lower tolerance though.
 

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Most invisible fences are intended to be used with barrier training, and even then most companies don't recommend using them for unsupervised free reign. They work for some people, but there's a lot of potential downsides (some of which might not apply to your situation, but just to cover the bases).

- Strays, wild animals, and people can get to your dog.

- The shock is two-way: if your dog blows through it to, say, chase a rabbit, they may not want to return to your land because they'll be shocked coming back as well. Happened regularly to an old neighbor of mine.

- Passer-bys will often find dogs barking at them from the other side of an invisible fence a lot more threatening than ones barking from behind a solid physical fence, regardless of whether your dogs are actually aggressive. Some places do have laws that dogs can be reported if another person is worried that they might bite, so it's worth considering.

- The dog could associate the shock with something unrelated, like a kid going by on a bike, a car, another dog, tractors, etc. and become fearful or reactive towards those things.

- In a similar vein, I've heard of more than one dog who became so fearful of the 'warning beep' most electric fence collars give that they freak out whenever they hear similar beeps - think a kitchen timer, fire alarm chirp, etc.

- You can't tell if it becomes damaged or inoperable by looking, and I know at least some brands will void any warranty if you, for example, use the wrong battery brand in the collars.

As I said: they work for some people. I personally wouldn't feel they're worth the risks for my own dogs, but if you want to try them, I'd urge you to put in the time and effort to do some really solid boundary training using positive reinforcement to stay within the "safe" zone, rather than just expecting the collars to do the work for you.
 

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Personally, I don't like them. If a dog is that bad for escaping, I'd rather use a visible hot wire (cattle fence) as an aid in teaching him to respect fences and, that should be just inside the visible fence he is to respect.

Invisible fences still let threats, like strays in and, not every dog is going to respect an invisible fence, or any fence for that matter without boundary training.
 
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