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I just ordered an invisable fence for our 4 dogs, please someone tell me these work really good. We are in a rental house right now and cannot put up a real fence. I am a little worried about these types of fencing but really need something to keep my babies safe.
 

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How well they work for your dogs depends a lot on your dogs plus the training for it.

Drawbacks to invisible fences:
Some dogs just don't listen to them; high prey dogs especially may chase a squirrel or rabbits right past the fence and be so caught up in the chase they ignore the shock. They can then avoid coming back home since they don't want to cross the shock line again (once the thrill of the hunt is gone).

Batteries in the collars can die and thus have no effect- which people often discover when the dog runs past the fence with no issue. I've been chased by a dog with an invisible fence collar on, his owner went "oh, guess it quit working"

They do not kept OUT other dogs, animals or people. Depending on your neighborhood, this can be a big deal or minor inconvenience.

People walking by or neighbors may not know the fence is there or may not trust it. I am VERY nervous when I see a dog outside without a fence and I have no way to know if there is an invisible fence and/or will the dog obey it. My dog gets worked up since all he sees is a loose dog (aka possible threat to us in his mind).

That said, IF you train them well, supervise 100% of the time when they are outside and basically rely on the fence as back-up to your recall, they can be reasonably useful.
 

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Some dogs will run right through, with enough temptation. Some will become scared of the yard because of the zap (probably not many, but some). And they work quite well for some dogs. Make sure you do the entire training program, don't skip steps or try to go too fast.

Also, don't leave your dogs out there unsupervised. Invisible fences don't prevent other dogs, other animals, or people from going right in. Your dogs would be vulnerable to all kinds of things.

ETA: haha! I type too slow! Yeah, what Shell said :p.
 

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How well they work for your dogs depends a lot on your dogs plus the training for it.

Drawbacks to invisible fences:
Some dogs just don't listen to them; high prey dogs especially may chase a squirrel or rabbits right past the fence and be so caught up in the chase they ignore the shock. They can then avoid coming back home since they don't want to cross the shock line again (once the thrill of the hunt is gone).

Batteries in the collars can die and thus have no effect- which people often discover when the dog runs past the fence with no issue. I've been chased by a dog with an invisible fence collar on, his owner went "oh, guess it quit working"

They do not kept OUT other dogs, animals or people. Depending on your neighborhood, this can be a big deal or minor inconvenience.

People walking by or neighbors may not know the fence is there or may not trust it. I am VERY nervous when I see a dog outside without a fence and I have no way to know if there is an invisible fence and/or will the dog obey it. My dog gets worked up since all he sees is a loose dog (aka possible threat to us in his mind).

That said, IF you train them well, supervise 100% of the time when they are outside and basically rely on the fence as back-up to your recall, they can be reasonably useful.
I agree with all this. Because of the drawbacks listed, whih I consider major, I never recommend them.
 

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A sensitive dog could become afraid of the entire yard after being zapped for getting too close to the boundary.
 

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We have an invisible fence and I love it. Our yard is much to large for a regular fence, I could never afford it. But since we live on a four lane highway, I needed something to help keep the dog in the yard. I didn't want to always have him tied up.

But you have to be aware of its limitations, as the others have said. It is always in the back on my mind that it could fail at any time and it has. Dead batteries, bad box, broken wire that for some reason failed to set of the alarm. Never rely on it for total security. It is a great device, as long and you never,ever forget its limitation.

Hopefully all the dogs will train to it. I have known people whose dogs refused to train to the fence. One friends dog would sit on the line, where it just beeped the warning but didn't shock. Then just wait for the battery to run down. When the beeps stopped she knew it was safe to leave the yard. I knew someone else who actually put two collars on their dog, but it still didn't work. I think that was mean anyway.

It has good points and bad, unfortunately though it is one of those things you won't know until you have tried it with your dogs.

Thankfully it has worked well for us. But neither of our dogs have been high prey dogs. Our last was a very dumb but loveable lab mix. Our current dog is a poodle/ schnauzer mix, very easily trained and biddable. You couldn't bribe our dog across that line with filet mignon! LOL
 

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Two of my three dogs would walk right through one on the highest setting.... The third my make some body contortions but would following the other two right right through....
 

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My sister had a Heeler and it used to walk up to where it would beep, take a big breath and run through it. It worked fine once they had a regular fence up and stopped him from digging out. For some reason Susie, who is 8 years old now, has decided to push her way out of the yard through my page wire fence so I have had to put an electric wire from my horse fence along the bottom to stop her.
 

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I work with a guy who has 2 GSDs and two labs. The GSDs figured out immediately that the shock is short and freedom is long and the labs gamely followed. Even my dog, who is very soft, would probably run right through it after a rabbit. Once one of your dogs figures it out, the others will follow.
 

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My sister had a Heeler and it used to walk up to where it would beep, take a big breath and run through it. It worked fine once they had a regular fence up and stopped him from digging out. For some reason Susie, who is 8 years old now, has decided to push her way out of the yard through my page wire fence so I have had to put an electric wire from my horse fence along the bottom to stop her.
My two will not even react.... Both know what it means, but will walk right through it...

Invisible fence means nothing to a stoic dog....
 

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I have a Shichon and a Chihuahau and neither have EVER crossed the line. Also, from a humane perspective, I am pleased that they NEVER get shocked any more, either. They got a shocked a few times at first, and now have both learned the boundry and respect it. My yard is crawling with squirrels that my Shichon loves to chase, but he stops short of the fence. It is funny, because the squirrels all know where the line is too, and stop running just past it, and turn and flick their tails at him. Both my dogs have gentle natures and that may be why I have such good results with radio fences. I used PetSafe and installed my own, by the way, but I think they are all pretty much the same.
 

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You also need to make sure they don't get shocked at the wrong time so they make the wrong association. Someone on my mail route got a new Lab puppy this spring and introduced him to me so he wouldn't want to eat the mail carrier like most dogs. Typical friendly Lab, would run out to greet me sometimes. Recently they got an invisible fence, and he came running out to greet me. Hit the line, got zapped, screamed, ran for the porch and sat there whimpering (the owner laughed :mad:). He apparently thinks I did it to him because, ever since, he's been barking and posturing aggressively at me. I hope he never decides it's worth the zap to come eat the evil zap-causing mail carrier :(.
 

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Shame on the owner for not teaching the dog the boundries. If he had, the dog would have realized there was a new line he could not cross, and it was the line that shocked him, not you.

A bunch of white flags come in the box, to mark the boundry. I went a step further and laid a white rope all the way around to make sure my dog understood EXACTLY where the line was.
 

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The lawn had flags, and the owner said he was trained to it. The dog apparently wasn't paying attention at that particular time.
 

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My uncle used to have one for his Irish Setter. Marley banged into it somehow, maybe chasing a rabbit or something, but because she was zapped, she will no longer go outside alone. She will flat out refuse to go out even though she has to go; so now my uncle has to put her on a leash (his yard isn't fenced in and near a busy road) to take her outside.

But I hear for some people they work just fine. I think it depends on the dog and if the collar works, but I've heard (from here) that some dogs just will bypass it and keep going. Good luck with yours.
 

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I've read stories from people who have invisible fences. Some love them, some don't. Most who love them have told me that they feel the need to be out there with the dogs, just in case. To me, that makes no sense but that's just me. I personally would never have one. I have one dog in particular who would take the jolt, of that I'm sure. The other one is so sensitive, one shock would be the end of her. I have a privacy fence around our yard, I like being able to put them outside. No one can see them, other dogs can't get in.
To the OP: you have inquired about invisible fences before you ordered it. You may want to re-think things before you install it.
 

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One last thing to digest, 4 dogs, 4 collars, one of them or more get shocked, then because of the fear of the shock comes a yelp and a great big fist fight starts because when dogs yelp in pain possible strange things can occur.

Will it happen, don't know but dog fights or just a snarl and a snap have started with less and an injury happens.
 

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Esther, I am quite sure, would not be deterred by any non-lethal setting. Molly would get one warning jolt and refuse to ever set foot in the yard again.

I can believe it would work for some dogs. I don't believe it would work for either of mine.
 
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