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Discussion Starter #1
Here are my three boys. The youngest is Mason, who is now just under 5 months old, Murphy is 15 months old, and Max is 3 years 2 months old. Max was a rescue, and was originally going to be a foster for my wife and I, but quickly became family.





The first pic was when Mason was 2 months old, and the second was him at 3 months. I'll get another pic soon to show how big he's grown.

I've got nothing but good things to say about this breed. They are a lot of work, however! Just the other day Max missed our doggie door (can't figure out how - it's gigantic), and busted the back door through the frame. Max was of course completely unhurt. He's a big baby, but a big baby tank. That's the worst we've had, but there is a lot of brushing and pickup involved. Puppy-proofing areas is not like what you can do with other breeds. A Newfie's size and power, and the crazy-fast way they grow in their first year, can catch you by surprise. And of course they slobber. When walking them I always bring a drool rag. But they're great best furry friends! They love absolutely everyone. Some dogs always vary, but Newfies are most often trusting and affectionate with your whole family, as well as unfamiliar people and dogs. They're great around kids because they're so tolerant of sudden movement and loud bursts of noise.

They can scare a lot of people at first just due to their size, but when I walk my boys I nearly always have someone ask to take a picture with them. It's kind of funny. My buddies don't mind.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Okay, took out the door beats any story I have! They are really beautiful.
Thanks! I love them dearly.

If my interest was in very large hairy dogs there would be no other breed of choice, Newfies rule.
Leonbergers are also a great choice for a huge, hairy beast that loves belly rubs, but Newfies are my favorite.
 

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OMG, what gorgeous babies!!!!!
I'm a giant breed fan (owning 5 Great Danes) and love the Newfies. The only thing that keeps me from owning one is the grooming. But I'll tell ya, looking at those pics makes it difficult to resist. What precious faces. Mason is a heartbreaker with his puppy looks. As for the adults; I could just curl up and go to sleep on one. Like sleeping on a cloud...so soft..... :)
 

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Thanks! Before we had a Newfie, my wife and I wanted an all-black female. Instead we ended up choosing a brown male, and he was wonderful. It was tragic when he passed, but I treasure the time we had with him. Now I really like all the colors, and hope one day to have one of the brown/white Newfies, even if the AKC won't recognize that coloring.

All my big guys love Great Danes. When my brown, Ozzy, was just a pup, he cheered up a scared Great Dane rescue. Now Murphy and I are in an advanced class with a 9-month old Great Dane. They're a sweet and fun breed. Unfortunately I don't get to use them as pillows. Max seems to think my chest is his pillow. He'll lay on me while we watch TV for hours sometimes.
 

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Your Newf and Landseer are really cute!! I knew only two Newfs and they're the most gentlest of dogs (gentle giants); I'd love to see a Landseer though.
 

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LOVE LOVE LOVE THEM!!! I am on a waiting list for a female landseer newfie :) Norbert though is my mix, newfie/chessie...love him to pieces!
 

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There was a Newf in Bear's CGN class and she was a beauty. Her owner and I were sitting next to each other and she kept coming over to sit on my feet and lay her head in my lap. I could have brushed her hair with my fingers aaaall day. Of course as soon as Bear was released from his crate he had to run over and climb into my lap and make sure everyone knew HE was my baby and nobody else. Poor fella.

I love the Newf girls at the dog shows who walk around with their big pink bibs to keep them from drooling all over their chests (and sometimes also big dog panties if they're in heat.)
 

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ust the other day Max missed our doggie door (can't figure out how - it's gigantic), and busted the back door through the frame. Max was of course completely unhurt. He's a big baby, but a big baby tank.
LOLO
Oh my goodness, I would be horrified and entertained all at the same time.
 

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Busted through the door?
Welcome to the club, Newfies are probably the most accident prone puppies out there. lol
At least they're smart and loyal right?
Gorgeous puppies though, may I suggest a bib? I know many Newfies who own one.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Busted through the door?
Welcome to the club, Newfies are probably the most accident prone puppies out there. lol
At least they're smart and loyal right?
Gorgeous puppies though, may I suggest a bib? I know many Newfies who own one.
We've thought about using a bib, but so far we just keep baskets of small towels in a few places throughout the house. It serves for a quick grab when the "ick" strikes. I've learned to be on guard for that, since Max can sling slobber about 20 feet. Someone I know makes custom bibs that aren't expensive, and I think I'll order a few. Landseers are very much like black/browns, but they tend to be taller and a little less thick in the body.

It's weird how black dogs/cats are harder to place than other colors. People are very superstitious. When we decided to bring a Newfie into our home, our first choice was a black female, but when we visited the breeder we were so taken with a brown female we met that we started off with a brown male (male/female wasn't that big of a deal to us). They're stunning little bears. I doubt we'll get a female anytime soon. Two of my three male Newfies are intact, and that would not be fun to deal with. With this breed it's recommended by several sources to wait to spay/neuter them until 18-24 months. Otherwise their hormones can get messed up and cause bone and joint problems. I don't want to try to keep a female in heat away from intact males with their kind of strength. They could literally tunnel through the walls if motivated enough.

My youngest bear Mason is creeping up on 5 months old now (3 more days). He's nearly 80 pounds and his adult fur is starting to come in. He's going from poofy matte black to dark shiny black. I just enrolled him today in an intermediate obedience course. Can't wait to start. I already know how to do the training, but the classes are fun for the furry ones and I have a blast, too.
 

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We've thought about using a bib, but so far we just keep baskets of small towels in a few places throughout the house. It serves for a quick grab when the "ick" strikes. I've learned to be on guard for that, since Max can sling slobber about 20 feet. Someone I know makes custom bibs that aren't expensive, and I think I'll order a few. Landseers are very much like black/browns, but they tend to be taller and a little less thick in the body.

It's weird how black dogs/cats are harder to place than other colors. People are very superstitious. When we decided to bring a Newfie into our home, our first choice was a black female, but when we visited the breeder we were so taken with a brown female we met that we started off with a brown male (male/female wasn't that big of a deal to us). They're stunning little bears. I doubt we'll get a female anytime soon. Two of my three male Newfies are intact, and that would not be fun to deal with. With this breed it's recommended by several sources to wait to spay/neuter them until 18-24 months. Otherwise their hormones can get messed up and cause bone and joint problems. I don't want to try to keep a female in heat away from intact males with their kind of strength. They could literally tunnel through the walls if motivated enough.

My youngest bear Mason is creeping up on 5 months old now (3 more days). He's nearly 80 pounds and his adult fur is starting to come in. He's going from poofy matte black to dark shiny black. I just enrolled him today in an intermediate obedience course. Can't wait to start. I already know how to do the training, but the classes are fun for the furry ones and I have a blast, too.
We went out search for a black female, I love black dogs and I've always owned females, I've only heard about that hormone problem with the males....I'm going to have to check into that as I was planning on spaying early because of problem females can have early on if not spayed. I would rather treat for infection or put up with bitchiness from a bitch than to have to worry about bone problems.

Tunnelling through walls? been there, not really but Manna did put a hole in the wall of our spare bedroom last night before bed by running into it too hard. I swear Newfie puppies are born without brakes!

Manna is *goes to count weeks on calendar* 19 weeks old....wait that seems too old 4 months and 11 days = 19 weeks? (my math can be bad so can someone help me please?)
50 pounds of skin and bone (the vet is happy with that weight) but is still at that matt black stage looking like a fluffy teddy bear. Pretty smart for her age though so her first beginner obedience class is on Wednesday.
Same with the training but I haven't had to train a puppy in over 15 years so I need the refresher. I can train some awesome stuff before then though :).
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
If she's a little over 4 months, she'll start getting her adult coat in the next month or so. 50 pounds at 4 months for a Newfie is a little light, but not terribly so. Still within normal range. I'll ask my breeder, but I believe you'll run into the same problem with early spaying that you would early neutering. I know she doesn't spay her females (even those not being bred) until 24 months. She hasn't had any trouble with infections, but she does have a less than fun time keeping the intact males away from them when their heat strikes. Luckily she's got a ranch with metal fencing and loads of space. I hear you about the "bull in a china shop" we deal with when having giants living with us. Puppy-proofing their areas generally has to be revisited every 4-7 days, or they'll outgrow our precautions. I'm fortunate in that my 5 month old boy Mason hangs out in the same area I previously puppy-proofed for my 1 year old Murphy. I haven't had to make any changes.

Manna is beautiful! Is she completely black? Mason is all black, except for a stripe of white on his chest.
 

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If she's a little over 4 months, she'll start getting her adult coat in the next month or so. 50 pounds at 4 months for a Newfie is a little light, but not terribly so. Still within normal range. I'll ask my breeder, but I believe you'll run into the same problem with early spaying that you would early neutering. I know she doesn't spay her females (even those not being bred) until 24 months. She hasn't had any trouble with infections, but she does have a less than fun time keeping the intact males away from them when their heat strikes. Luckily she's got a ranch with metal fencing and loads of space. I hear you about the "bull in a china shop" we deal with when having giants living with us. Puppy-proofing their areas generally has to be revisited every 4-7 days, or they'll outgrow our precautions. I'm fortunate in that my 5 month old boy Mason hangs out in the same area I previously puppy-proofed for my 1 year old Murphy. I haven't had to make any changes.

Manna is beautiful! Is she completely black? Mason is all black, except for a stripe of white on his chest.
A little white on the chest, tip of her tail, and on a toe or 2 on 3 of her paws. Yeah 50 pounds is on the light side of normal but she just can't seem to gain weight even though she eats like a horse.
Vet cleared her as healthy after drawing blood and treating for worms "just in case" so we're hoping for a growth spurt. She really active though so that might explain some things.

I just saw my vet at the dog park, she doesn't breed newfies but does breed/shows Mastiffs (I can't remember which kind now...bull I think) I ended up asking her any ways and she said that yes it can lead to an increase in things like hip displasia (sp?) and it's pretty much the same across the board for all the giant breeds but the increase is a very low percentage (I think she said 2% increase) and as long as you don't make her pound on her joints for the first year, preferably 2 years, then it more than cancels out. Add in the preventative supplements I'm feeding and supposedly we should be good.
There are also many issues with dogs in general if left intact ranging from a shorter lifespan and pyrometra which can result in emergency surgery if not caught early enough. Spaying at an earlier age can also reduce mammary and uterine cancers.

I'm going to have to think on this a bit more to be honest.

Puppy proofing is a daily deal here and even then she still manages to break everything.


Good luck to us eh? we might have an intact house after they all grow up.
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
Definitely I wish you good luck! Mason is now one week from 6 months of age and he's 90 pounds. I'll be glad when the growth spurts slow down a bit! He isn't the slightest bit ungainly or fat. In fact, he zooms around like a much smaller puppy. Your vet gave you good advice on the restrictions. From what I've read and the breeders I've spoken to, here are 10 of my guidelines for exercise and feeding of my giant ones:

1. Get insurance. It's less than $100 for all three of our Newfies, and we had to add our rescue in when he was over 2 and 1/2 years old (when we got him). Even though we make good money, expensive things can happen unexpectedly, so insurance is my first advice to new giant dog owners.

2. Basic training and socialization is required, not optional. This should be the case for every dog, but it's particularly important with dogs that are so large and strong. Since Newfies are known as 'gentle giants' people often operate under the delusion that they'll be huge, furry pillows that don't move around much and are great around everyone. Though Newfies have a lower activity level than many dogs, they still require exercise and are still 'babies', even when they're 100+ pounds. Newfies are big lovers and are indeed very tolerant of all kinds of things, but they don't come already knowing how to do everything. Can't believe how many people I've chatted with in groups that were astounded their Newfies were knocking over furniture and people without any training.

3. During the first year no long walks. That definition varies slightly from dog to dog, but generally speaking I mean no more than 30 minutes at a stretch. I often take my Newfies to parks and pet-friendly indoor places, but a lot of their time is spent doing basic training and getting attention (they're canine rock stars due to their beauty and size). Play at home and daily short walks keep them happy.

4. After a year they're pretty much done growing in height and length, so by this time any growth in the bones will be minimal. Newfies will out until sometimes 3 years old, and their structure will grow a little after a year, but not very much. At this point they can take longer walks and slightly harder play. A little tug or their own playtime is great, but I still monitor so it doesn't get too rough.

5. At 3 years old they're set and fully mature physically. At this point they're like furry tanks. You should still be careful with them, but they're ready to rock for just about anything.

6. Pulling a lightweight cart with nothing in it is OK at about 6 months (just to get them used to having something behind them), but no loads will be pulled until 2 and 1/2 years old.

7. At no time is repeated jumping up and down good for them. My wife and I bought a trailer hitch and ramp for vehicle wheelchair access for loading them into our SUV. We built a wood ramp with carpet cover and high-grip runners for them to get up and down from our bed.

8. Install appropriate doggie door. This seems like a no-brainer, but a lot of people don't understand that besides getting the biggest doggie door on the market (that I found), it should also be elevated 6 inches off the floor so the Newfies don't have to constantly duck. We had to knock a wall out of our house to achieve this. The only exception I really see to this is if you either work from home or aren't gone that long.

9. Newfies eat as much as they want, so long as they don't get fat. I give my Newfies quite a bit of food in the morning and again in the afternoon. Unlike other dogs I've owned, Newfies will stop eating when they're done. At least this has been my experience. I feel for ribs and keep a close eye on their coats, but have rarely had to alter their food portions. My 3 year old Max is 152 pounds, which is as much as he should really weigh as he's only 28 inches tall at the withers. He looks and feels great, but when he hit 160 pounds I dialed his food portions down a bit. The stoutness was pushing it. My 15 month old Murphy is 136 pounds, but he's at least 30 inches at the withers, so I expect he'll eventually weigh more than Max.

10. All giant breeds are particularly prone to bloat, so I have an hour calmness rule after feeding. This is only during the evening meal, when I add in a few things they like. Generally the morning meal is picked at throughout the day. No one is allowed to run around or wrestle for an hour after dinner.

I'm sure they're loads more of things to consider, but those are the ones I could think of off the top of my head. Of course I avoid even moderately warm temperatures with the Newfies, so during the 6 warmer months I only walk them indoors. They love the extra exposure to people and pets. I also suggest Newfie owners get a Soggy Doggy shammy or something similar. We have Soggy Doggy mats set up around our water bowl and other places to both soak up the rain after drinks and give the Newfies more traction to stand/lay down. The shammy is a smaller version of the mat that folds over and is sewn together at both ends. I loop it through my belt about 3 inches, and I have something I can slide my hand into at any time to wipe drool off when we're out and about.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
There are also many issues with dogs in general if left intact ranging from a shorter lifespan and pyrometra which can result in emergency surgery if not caught early enough. Spaying at an earlier age can also reduce mammary and uterine cancers.
I'm not in favor of leaving dogs intact unless they're being bred. However, I've heard repeatedly that spaying/neutering a Newfie before 18 months is a very bad idea. I am not an expert on this, and don't have scientific data to support this. I'll ping the members of my Facebook forums. I belong to several giant dog forums, including two specifically for Newfies. Some of the members are professional breeders as well. I'll respond when I get more information on it. What I've heard is that getting a Newfie fixed too early can cause hormonal and growth/joint problems. My plan is to get my 15-month old neutered when he's between 18 and 24 months old.
 
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