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I have a "HUGE" phobia about preservatives! My little 5 and 1/2 year old dog just died ... I had to put him down as he was too far gone to be saved ... and I party blame it on all the ethoxyquin he ingested before I knew it was a pesticide/preservative in his food. He ate a food with this and food coloring and corn and wheat and soy for almost five years ...... he had pancreatic neucrosis and a huge mass in his stomach which according to the vet/surgeon was probable cancer. Sure ... it could have been genetic ... I cannot prove otherwise ... but my gut says different .....

I have switched my dogs to a better food now .......
 

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Corn. Historically, the waste from producing corn for human consumption was first put into dog food to make money off of it. It causes a myriad of problems for many dogs - a big cause of kibble allergy, along with wheat and soy. Look at the ingredients of many lower quality kibbles - corn (often named in several different ways) will be in the first 3-5 ingredients - total filler. It simply goes out the other end, causing larger poos, b/c it can't be digested by dogs.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Corn. Historically, the waste from producing corn for human consumption was first put into dog food to make money off of it. It causes a myriad of problems for many dogs - a big cause of kibble allergy, along with wheat and soy. Look at the ingredients of many lower quality kibbles - corn (often named in several different ways) will be in the first 3-5 ingredients - total filler. It simply goes out the other end, causing larger poos, b/c it can't be digested by dogs.
Show me some science on this. I agree it shouldn't be a major component of a food but show me the science on digestibility and allergies. There are at least 28 peer reviewed studies that show corn is only responsible for about 2-3% of valid and very rare food allergies, about the same as rice or potatoes.

Chicken, beef, eggs & dairy are responsible for over 90%.

So since you have a phobia about this, present the science please.

From Dr. Susan Wynn:

"If dogs have the genetic predisposition to develop food allergies, they can become allergic to certain foods. A recent review of 7 studies indicates that dogs are most commonly allergic to the following foods (in descending order): beef, dairy, wheat, egg, chicken, lamb/mutton, soy, pork, rabbit and fish."

I don't see any grains.

So the phobia about corn is completely false. Next phobia please, please make it beet pulp.
 

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Isn't a "phobia", by definition, an irrational fear? And you want people to submit proof? LOL.
 

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There will always be two sides to the corn debate. Here's one source:
http://myallergiesstory.com/corn-allergies-for-dogs/
Here's another: http://www.muttropolis.com/content/allergies-dog.cfm
Another: http://www.ehow.com/facts_5621800_corn-allergies-dogs.html
And another: http://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/dog-food-industry-exposed/dog-food-corn/

While many other ingredients can cause problems for dogs as seen in several of these links, corn is not altogether innocent either.

I prefer to not have it in my dog's kibble, along with wheat and soy.
 

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Isn't a "phobia", by definition, an irrational fear? And you want people to submit proof? LOL.
Yup ... just like I have an irrational fear that all my other dogs will die the "same" untimely death from the same "exact" disease from ingesting ethoxyquin ......... :)

Beet pulp is a controversial subject ... as it is a filler/fiber. Fiber is good for the colon. But that list of controversy goes on and on ... from what I have read ... not saying any of it is true ... just because it is written on the internet. :/
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Yup ... just like I have an irrational fear that all my other dogs will die the "same" untimely death from the same "exact" disease from ingesting ethoxyquin ......... :)

Beet pulp is a controversial subject ... as it is a filler/fiber. Fiber is good for the colon. But that list of controversy goes on and on ... from what I have read ... not saying any of it is true ... just because it is written on the internet. :/
In science beet pulp is not controversial.

""Beet pulp has been found to be an ideal source of moderately fermentable fiber. Fiber sources such as cellulose, bentonite, peanut hulls or soy bean hulls are poor sources because they are not very fermentable. The correct amount and type of fiber is necessary for a normal healthy digestive tract. There are bacteria in the normal healthy digestive track. These bacteria have the ability to ferment or digest certain types of fiber. The ideal fiber is partially fermentable or digestible, i.e., beet pulp. We want some fiber left to provide that bulk to the stool that is necessary for a healthy digestive system, but we also want some of the fiber to be digested by the bacteria. 1

Beet pulp in a diet encourages colonization of those bacteria which best ferment or digest that form of fiber and discourage those organisms which do not effectively ferment fiber. It so happens that many good bacteria that commonly inhabit the large intestines can deal with beet pulp ( Lactobacillus acidophilus and Enterococcus faecium are just two) and many pathogenic bacteria are not supported by its presence (Clostridium sp.,Salmonella sp. and e. coli)2.

Because beet pulp is an ideal food source for these good bacteria, they tend to overgrow potentially bad bacteria (pathogens and gas producers) and make the gut much more resistant to these harmful organisms. As a result of this digestive or fermentation process, vital nutrients called short chain fatty acids are produced which provide superior nutrition to the cells lining the large intestine enhancing their ability to function.

These short chain fatty acids (SCFA) are the key to a healthy and efficient digestive tract. The cells that line the intestinal track feed voraciously on SCFA. These cells have a high turnover rate and rely on SCFA to provide adequate nutrition. 3

That portion of beet pulp left after the fermentation of bacterial digestive process promotes ideal nutrient digestibility. The volume of stool is not excessive thus allowing the motility of the gut to move the nutrients along at a rate which assures maximum digestion and absorption.4

1. Buterwick, Maxwell. The effect of level and source of dietary fiber on
food intake in the dog. Journal of Nutrition 1994 Vol. 124


2 Collins MD, Gibson Dr. Nutritional modulation of microbial ecology. American
Journal of Clinical Nutrition 1998


3. Hallman JE, Moxley RA, et al. Cellulose, beet pulp and pectin/gum arabic
effects on canine microstructure and histopathology. Veterinary Clinical
Nutrition 1995;2:137-141


4. Albert s. Townshend DVM, Wellness for Life, Am Journal of Clinical
Nutrition 2000


In a 40lb bag of food there is about a coffee mug's worth of beet pulp, if that.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
There will always be two sides to the corn debate. Here's one source:
http://myallergiesstory.com/corn-allergies-for-dogs/
Here's another: http://www.muttropolis.com/content/allergies-dog.cfm
Another: http://www.ehow.com/facts_5621800_corn-allergies-dogs.html
And another: http://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/dog-food-industry-exposed/dog-food-corn/

While many other ingredients can cause problems for dogs as seen in several of these links, corn is not altogether innocent either.

I prefer to not have it in my dog's kibble, along with wheat and soy.

There is not one peer reviewed study in that. And by the way The Dog Food Advisor is a dentist.

Cornell did a study of 10,000 dogs with bonafide food allergies and found rice and corn to be equal at 1%. There was a compilation study by Ghent that grouped all grains and came up with less than 5%, all grains.
 

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What about intolerances? Gluten intolerance in humans isn't an allergy, but they can't eat gluten anyway. I agree that histaminic reactions (true allergies) to grains are rare but I think intolerances are fairly common.
 

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Yes because they don't realize it is irrational. By asking for proof they learn.
OK, so you asked people to post their "favorite food phobias," and your goal seems to be to bash what people post and demand proof...for educational purposes? And it seems like really you just want to argue with people? Lovely.
 

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OK, so you asked people to post their "favorite food phobias," and your goal seems to be to bash what people post and demand proof...for educational purposes? And it seems like really you just want to argue with people? Lovely.
Not only that but he doesn't want to link to any proof to back up his own claims.
 

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@WalterDog is pretty much spot on. People hate on corn for the wrong reasons imho. Processed corn products is not a significant source of allergies. However, you should shy away where it is used together with soy as a (deceptive) protein booster. Quality formulas shouldn't source large amounts of proteins from plants. Corn is a decent (not more than decent though) source of energy and can play a role when you want to add extra energy and/or keep cost at a reasonable level. Personally I stay away from kibble with corn simply because I believe there are other better alternatives that can play the same role in the formula. But if I where in a situation where I had lots of dogs/high feeding costs/special training program etc., I wouldn't turn down formulas with corn products in them if they where there for the right reasons.

Beet pulp (sans sugar) is not a filler. It's a good source of dietary fiber necessary for absorption and assimilation of essential vitamins and minerals. A hardcore PMR feeder can argue it's a filler but then most things going into kibble would be a filler. So, for the rest of us, a quality fiber is not a filler. It's one of those myths that refuses to die.

But hey, this is a phobia thread so people can have phobias over all sorts of stuff, I have my fair share :) My food phobia is China, plain and simple.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
What about intolerances? Gluten intolerance in humans isn't an allergy, but they can't eat gluten anyway. I agree that histaminic reactions (true allergies) to grains are rare but I think intolerances are fairly common.
Corn has no "gluten", Oats have no "gluten", Rice has no "gluten", Barley has some "gluten" but it is actually very low.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
@WalterDog is pretty much spot on. People hate on corn for the wrong reasons imho. Processed corn products is not a significant source of allergies. However, you should shy away where it is used together with soy as a (deceptive) protein booster. Quality formulas shouldn't source large amounts of proteins from plants. Corn is a decent (not more than decent though) source of energy and can play a role when you want to add extra energy and/or keep cost at a reasonable level. Personally I stay away from kibble with corn simply because I believe there are other better alternatives that can play the same role in the formula. But if I where in a situation where I had lots of dogs/high feeding costs/special training program etc., I wouldn't turn down formulas with corn products in them if they where there for the right reasons.

Beet pulp (sans sugar) is not a filler. It's a good source of dietary fiber necessary for absorption and assimilation of essential vitamins and minerals. A hardcore PMR feeder can argue it's a filler but then most things going into kibble would be a filler. So, for the rest of us, a quality fiber is not a filler. It's one of those myths that refuses to die.

But hey, this is a phobia thread so people can have phobias over all sorts of stuff, I have my fair share :) My food phobia is China, plain and simple.
I use a food with human grade whole ground corn and any food from an EU Cert plant will use the same. The combination of rice and corn is unbeatable.
 

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Corn has no "gluten", Oats have no "gluten", Rice has no "gluten", Barley has some "gluten" but it is actually very low.
I wasn't talking about gluten in particular. I meant dietary intolerances in general.

And rice gluten is a common ingredient in pet foods.
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
I wasn't talking about gluten in particular. I meant dietary intolerances in general.

And rice gluten is a common ingredient in pet foods.
The "gluten" associated with intolerances is specific to grasses like wheat, barley and rye. The term "gluten" is used too liberally. Barley & Rye have just trace amounts, though.

Rice, corn, oats, millet, sorghum have none of the protein subsets of true "gluten".
 
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