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Hi everyone,
After is anyone out there that can Help. In any way on this I would appreciate it.

I have a 2 to 3 Year old German shepherd that I rescued.. It was a situation where he was not taken he was likely to be put down. When I 1st met him he was outside in a kennel And attacking the side of the kennel so hard he was bending the fence. That night he seemed to knowledge me as his new owner as well as my girlfriend and husband faithful to us ever since. However if anyone else is around he will go Berzerk. He has bitten two people Who he interpreted as a threat to myself Although they were not.( He was even found to be in the right As he could not know I have known better).


He understands the word He understands the word sit and down Sit and down. Although he does not stay at all. He is very impulsive and anxious. And was removed from a dog trainer class Was supposed to go to private lessons but then Things got shut down and everything was on hold for a while.

I have done a lot of research on YouTube and the InternetI have not banana to find something that help so far. And he is not very treat motivated.


I have considered boarding training but it's just not in the budget at the moment. At least anything I found up here in New York.

I am willing to put the time and effort into thisI And would greatly appreciate any insights or advice that someone can give.
 

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The fact that he has a bite record is not good. How severe were the bites? How much warning did he give for them? Who determined that he was "in the right"? Has your local animal control agency placed any restrictions on him?

I would recommend a consultation with a veterinary behaviorist. Your regular vet might need to give you a formal referral, but you can check the ACVB website yourself. https://www.dacvb.org/search/custom.asp?id=4709

A good, positive based trainer is also an option. There are a couple of places where you can look for one. First is the Association of Professional Dog Trainers APDT Trainer Search. Another is the Certification Council for Professional Dog Trainers. Certified Dog Trainer and Behavior Consultant Directory - CCPDT

Meanwhile. muzzle training would be a very good idea. The Muzzle Up! Project has lots of info. The Muzzle Up! Project | Muzzle advocacy, Education, and Training
 
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Does his body language seem scared when he is aggressing? That's usually the issue with stranger aggression. he feels they are a threat to you or him.

I don't know what he can handle, but never put him in a situation where he'll be tempted to bite. Keep him at a distance, so that he sees, but is not reacting to, a stranger (you can get a friend to pretend to be the "stranger" in formal training sessions. Over a couple months, progress slowly- don't push it- to closer distances, 'til he can be reasonably close. At this point, maybe have the "stranger" toss a treat, if that doesn't make him more nervous.
Make meeting strangers always a positive experience for him

"Watch me" is one of the most important ever commands. Teach him a solid watch me. This can get his focus off the object he is feeling threatened by/aggressive towards.

Teach him a solid stay. It takes patience, but is necessary. Work on his sit or down whichever you choose, and gradually start marking and rewarding after a longer sit (or down) First, you reward right away, then after a second, then after two, then three, etc. After you've dot 10-15 seconds in a non-distracting environment, you can start asking for a 2-3 second one in a slightly more exciting environment. Eventually, after a lot of time and effort, you can apply this to situations where he is becoming aggressive. You will probably also want to work on stay with distance, where you walk just a step away, then two, you get the idea.

"Boarding training is too expensive"
I get that. And in my experience, that's not always the best option anyway. The dog needs to learn with and from you- which is why, IMO, traditional classes are better. I second @LeoRose on this. And on the muzzle training- as a management option, not a solution, of course. Try a positive-based trainer. Training classes that you take your dog to basically have a trainer teaching you, and helping you implement it with your dog- the trainer often doesn't have much of any contact with the dog. This way, it translates better to real life, when the trainer is not there

"he is impulsive"
Try the "it's yer choice" game. This teaches the dog to wait for permission, because he learns he doesn't get what he wants unless he's patient. Two of the most useful variations of this are the original one, with the closed fist that is "unlocked" if he stops trying to get it, (my favorite variation is basically this, but the treat is on the floor, and you cover it with your hand and foot every time he goes for it, until he learns to wait for permission) and the one where you have him stay in the crate with treats outside, and show him that trying to rush out results in a closed crate door, and waiting results in release from you.
 
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