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Discussion Starter #1
:wink: I am 74 years old and have always lived with a dog or dogs. My last dog was a Shih Tzu that I had to put down at 14 tears with multiple large cancerous tumors. My children thought that it would be best if old dad had a dog. They found an 14 week old female Shih Tzu/ Bichon frises mix that was to be without a home shortly. It's owners we're going into assisted living. So they paid a considerable amount of $$$ for her. I decided to crate train her and use my fenced in back yard. I have had success with this in the past. I feed her "Taste of the wild" dry puppy food. I will not feed a grain based chow to a carnivore. We we making great strides in house breaking until the vet wanted to house spay her. She came home with the "collar" and recooperated in her crate. To this point I had had great success with her coming like a rocket each time I whistled. So, she is trainable. Let me just list what happened after the surgery.
- any progress in housebreaking went out the window.
- she would ear anything she could get in her mouth. Paper towels, napkins, t paper, grass, grapes from my neighbors vine, bark, sticks, plastic toys, did I mention grass-> she grazes! Not poop thank God!
-the woodwork in my house looks like a terminate infestation. Table n chair legs too
-she attacks fingers but will not attack mine...she responds to NO and starts licking.
-you can take her outside and immediately upon entering the house she will pee!
-Separation anxiety is terrible.
-my wife cannot pet her..she will bite her fingers. Nip might be a better way. I can pet her, rub her belly, etc. if she does nip, I say no and she stops and licks.

Let me finally say this.....she is a lovable dog and I do not want to give up on her. She is a member of the family. One other thing. I will not use electronic training aids of any kind.

Ok fellow dog lovers..what the heck do I do?
 

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Go right back to housetraining 101. She's crated much of the time and goes out on lead for potty walks. I walk adult dogs every hour so if she's less than 6 months old try every 1/2 hour for a couple days. Praise and treat when she goes outside, take her out on lead and pretend to potty her after she's pottied in the house then crate her and clean it up.

Keep her in the room with you and consider her your exercise regime.

Bucky is extremely worried about touch too. He was adopted as a biter and had long standing but minor mats throughout his coat. The ear mats were impressive 3' long felt earrings. We didn't touch him for the first few days. We used food. Rice grain sized bit of cheese in face, stroke the back. It went fast as he didn't have any history with us of snapping, in a couple weeks he was mat free. You might need to feed as your wife strokes. Important to pair this so food=touch. Since you are allowed to touch her then work on grooming. She will be better at the groomers if she isn't matted when she goes so get a soft brush to practice with and move to the slicker that pulls and really bothers dogs. At first food in face as you do the scary thing. I groom for a few minutes between treats then we play chase the cookie once done.

My home is so much cleaner with Bucky around. He pulls down and checks used cloth napkins, any paper, dirty dishes, socks and all for edibles that so we are getting really good about keeping things put away. I don't have a problem with my dogs grazing but if she enjoys grass perhaps you can use bits of vegetable trimmings as treats. My dogs work hard to be good dogs staying out of the kitchen during 'dinner theater' for such things as bits of raw carrot, sweet potato, broccoli, brussels sprout leaves, green beans and so on. When my large dogs were ravenous about grass I'd give them the biggest carrot in the bag or a large broccoli stem to chew up. Messy in the house though as those dogs didn't eat veggies. Great exercise squatting/stooping to clean it up. I got dogs as walking companions but they help with weight training as well!

Other than that what chews does she have available? It's really annoying but buying every sort of chew you can find is the best way to find something that suits her. Antlers, dried tendons, bully sticks, kongs, cow hooves, Himalayan cheese, nylabones are common ones. My 13.5 pound Bucky actually does a lot of chewing on a fake fur bone shaped stuffed toy. He adores fiber filled latex toys. Ginger adores her tug that has rope knots covered with fake fur. There are fake wood sticks and even super hard stump slices available you might look at for her. Bigger is better - longer lasting and cuter. You have to discard a chew as soon as it can be held completely in the mouth anyway so go big. The Himalayan cheese is interesting as once too small to chew you can puff it up in the microwave and not waste any of it.
 

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Agree with the posts so far; she is around 14wks old; puppy life; mine tore up many many many things and I dog proofed the house. Potty training was always difficult for mine, she is very stubborn before and after her spay; finally she understood. She is now 16mths old now; a little over a year and still have to keep the "no chewing" on non-toys daily learning. As for the sticks, bark, etc; hopeless; she loves the maple tree!! Couldn't stick proof the yard.
Here she is with her sticks:
IMG_0192.jpg
IMG_0190.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #5
She is 8 months old. Spayed at 5 months. I had them use laser surgery and therapy. In less than a week she was hard to hold down.
 

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8 months old is kind of prime "I'm a butthole teenager phase." Seeing some regression in training, stubbornness, and "testing the limits" is not unusual. They're developing a mind of their own and often need a little extra guidance.

For the potty training, go back to Housetraining 101. It's normal to see a little regression in house training at that age. Take her out often, supervise her at all times, and crate her when you can't. Praise her and give her treats for going in the correct place, and if she has an accident, ignore it and simply clean it up. Scolding can teach her that going in front of you is bad, rather than the intended going in the house is bad.

Keep your house clean, and keep her away from things she likes to chew. "Puppy Proofing" is the best way. Pick up shoes and other inappropriate objects. Make sure she has plenty of appropriate chews like antlers or chew toys. She should be supervised at all times, and if you catch her chewing something she shouldn't, redirect her to an appropriate chew and praise her for using it. If you have to, block off furniture if she can't leave it alone. Crate her when you can't supervise.

Try giving her a frozen stuffed Kong when you leave. That will usually occupy them and teach them that you leaving is not necessarily a bad thing.
 
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