Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Since we got our puppy we've had the hallway and my bedroom barricaded so that she cannot get into the rooms and get under the beds and chew on things she shouldn't. She really only has free roam of the living room and kitchen. But I'm tired of stepping over the barricades daily now and I'm wondering how do I prepare/train her for the rest of the house? I really don't want her under the beds. Can I train her not to?

This morning she was in my room with me and was being good laying at my feet chewing on a toy. Then she got up and started wandering. When she poked her nose under my bed I said "No Bailey", which usually makes her stop what she is doing, but instead she dashed under. She's becoming more stubborn about not coming out of places she is not supposed to be.

She also can get behind the bookcases and under the hutch where we have the TV. We can't get her out without moving the furniture and there are cords under there. Right now we have it blocked off but can't we train her to stop going under there?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,145 Posts
Sure you can, but training takes a lot of time and a lot of repetition. She's just a baby and has a lot to learn.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,186 Posts
Sounds like you're in for barricades for at least the next few months. (I had baby gates up for 5 years with Muggsy.) You test to see if you can remove the gates by trying it out for small periods of time at first. If she does okay with 10 minutes, try 20. If she's okay at 20, but tears apart the house at 30, she's not ready yet. You have to go at her pace.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,713 Posts
Training takes time. Get walk through baby gates. We have long term baby gates (dogs need to get out from underfoot when I cook) and got tired of stepping over them. Baby gate stays up, you open the door and walk through.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
291 Posts
If you want to remove the fencing you are going to need to crate train her and then tehjer her to you when she is not in the crate.

Young pups are full of adventure and love exploring. It is far more fun to dive under the dresser or the bed or corner unit than it is to be taken out of that area and stuck behind a gate.

To get them to come out willingly, you need to make yourself more rewarding. Have really high value treats, smellier the better. Throw a few just out of her reach and then tempt her out until she is sitting in front of you. Give her a jackpot of 3 treats and a hearty cuddle.

It does not last forever and unless you have a super small dog, she will eventually outgrow being able to fit under most of the furniture but in the meantime you have started the basics of the recall - getting her to realise that you are where the rewards come from.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,674 Posts
We've just gradually used our gates less and less over time. We have them set up so that you can allow different amounts of space, so first he just had one room, then two, now we can block off the stairs and he can just be downstairs. Hamilton is NEVER left alone in the house without being confined in his crate or pen, but when we're home, he generally hangs pretty close regardless of whether the gates are open or closed. Since he's been consistently asking to go out, and his recall is pretty good at home, I've let him walk out of sight for a few minutes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
891 Posts
Get used to the barricades, LOL. We have a permanent one by the back door. Annoying but necessary for Molly's safety. Soon, I hope to stop banging my knee on it as I cross over it but I don't see ever taking it down. I just have to keep working on my hurdling skills. ;)
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top