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I recently got a male Yorkshire Terrier from a breeder and things got off to a bad start. First, I received him with kennel cough, which upset me deeply because I was charged over $100 for the visit to the vet (which lasted about 10 minutes and they charged me $50 to "test" him by hearing him cough). Regardless, I made sure to give him his medicine and Nutri-Cal (I woke up every three hours during the night too). I'm trying to be as good of a mommy to him as I can, but now that he's gotten better, he likes to bite everything in sight - especially me! He'll wake me up in the morning by pulling my hair as hard as he can and even though he's only 2 1/2 lbs, he sure bites hard. I know better than to hit him and instead I say "No," in as firm of a voice as I can without yelling at him and hold his mouth closed (not hard, he just hates to feel restrained) for 3 seconds before letting him go, only that doesn't seem to work. He won't come to me when I call him, but he'll come to my friend when he calls him. My friend is the only one he doesn't bite constantly, but he barely ever sees him so I don't understand why. He won't look at me much and would rather have anyone else hold him, but me. It's heart-breaking for me because I'm trying to have him see me as his mom, or owner, but he seems to like everyone in the world more than me. I'm the only one to feed him, to give him treats, and all the things that show him I'm his owner. Am I doing something wrong? Is there anything that I can do to get him to warm up to me? He has a huge personality for such a small dog and he seriously gives me dirty looks! I'm just really lost right now and I'm hoping someone could tell me what I can do to fix things, or to tell me what I'm doing wrong.
 

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How old is he and when did you get him?

I will let others address your problems more specifically, but here are some larger themes:

-He probably 'likes other people more' because they are novel. He sees you every day, all the time, so your presence is 'boring.'
-Start training him! Play with him! Training will improve your bond and he will also focus on you more.
-If he bites your hair I assume he sleeps in bed with you. Unless you want that to be an ingrained habit, I would suggest crate training him (look it up or look in the stickies on this forum) and making him sleep in his crate. There is plenty of time in the future to snuggle. Now is the time to establish boundaries.
-Stop holding his mouth. Look up proper bite inhibition training. Puppies NEED to chew so make sure he has chew toys.
 

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Part of it is the holding of his mouth, part of it is likely the medicine. Dogs don't have logic. I hate, hate, hate having drops put in my ears*, I can't do it to myself. I make my MIL, the RN, do it. Now, I know that the drops are necessary and making me better, and I still cringe to see them in her hand. My dog has no such benefit of logic. When he saw me with the bottle in my hands, he ran. He fought me. He avoided me at all times, continuing for days after he was done with the medicine. There's nothing for it. You can slowly desensitize to grooming and such, because it can wait, but medicine can't wait.

The holding of his mouth is the same issue. Other people don't hold his mouth, you do, he avoids you. So read the sticky and try the other method.

To get his attention back to you, use treats. Lots of treats. Feed him his food from your hand, give him tasty little nibbles of real meat and cheese for coming to you. Make being around you a party.

As for the hair biting, I love me a dog in bed, but any dog biting my hair can sleep on his own bed.


*The winter of ear infections. I need me some spring!
 

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There is a sticky at the top of the forum page called "The Bite Stops Here." Read the sticky.It provides great advice.

Puppies learn about their environment, and play all by using their mouth. It's similar to how a human baby puts everything in their mouth. It's natural. So, you have to teach him properly not to bite you. Holding his mouth closed isn't going to do it.

Basically, the sticky advises you to use a sound (like a yelp, or saying OUCH!) to let the puppy know you didn't like that, and then leaving the area (leaving the puppy alone) for 20 seconds - a few minutes if it happens again. Of course, you start with the 20 seconds, and increase to the few minutes.
If you try the yelp, and it causes your puppy to be even more hyper and bite even more, it may be that that's not the right noise for your puppy. Some puppies are excited by a higher pitched noise. So, you could try the OUCH!

Read the sticky, and try it. Also, you have to realize that there will likely be a tiny bit of improvement, but, the nipping and biting will likely still go on for awhile, before it stops entirely. Most people underestimate how long it will take. So, be consistent, and be patient.
 

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The best advice I got was when to call my puppy vs going to her. If you are doing anything to him that he might not or will not like (giving him medicine, disciplining, giving him a bath, etc) always go to him, never make him come to you. Calling him to you should be for positive reasons only.
 

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Thank you very much for the advice, he doesn't bite anymore and he's gotten attached to me much more than he was before. However, he's still not listening to me and he'll even blatantly ignore me when I tell him to not do something. I'm living with my friend and her parents and her mom has a year old female yorkie as well. It's nice that my little Milo has a friend to play with, but now he's becoming overly attached to her mom. It's gotten to the point that he'll only acknowledge me when she's in the room and when she does walk into the room, he'll follow her around and whine when she goes into another room. She punishes him too, but only when I'm not home (which isn't often). Anything I can do? I give him treats and take him everywhere with me, but he still only wants her. I know I'm considered boring to him, but it's starting to be very exhausting because it seems like nothing I do works with him.
 

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Sometimes our human living situations can make training our dogs difficult. As I see it, you have 2 challenges:
1. Your dog is more attached to your friend's mom.
2. Your dog doesn't listen to you and ignores you when you ask him to do things.

If your ONLY challenge was that he's more attached to someone else besides you, I would say it's not that big of a deal. Dogs sometimes connect with one person in the household more than others, it doesn't mean they don't love the other people, just that they feel an attachment to the one person. One of our dogs definitely is more attached to me, one is more attached to my husband, and the third likes us both the same. :)
In the big picture, the fact that your dog has someone they love, that loves them, and that they are well cared for, that is what's important.

HOWEVER, it does seem that it's more than just an attachment, because your dog ignores you when you ask him to do something, and doesn't respond. AND, you mention that she sometimes punishes him (when you're not home).
IF the way your friend's mom is dealing with your dog is NOT how you'd like your dog to be trained, and that's why it's causing a problem, then you need to come up with a plan.

Basically, it's your dog, and it will be your dog after you have moved on from living with your friend and your friend's parents. So, you need to start training/raising the kind of dog you want your dog to be. If you don't agree with the way your friend's mom does things, you have a couple options:
- explain what you don't agree with, and explain how you would like to train your puppy. IF your friend's mom is agreeable to using your methods and training your puppy the way you want, then it's all good.
- IF your friend's mom doesn't agree with how you want to train your puppy and keeps doing what she wants to, then you basically need to keep your pup in your room when you are not home, so that your friend's family doesn't have any responsibilities with your pup.

If your pup is trained one way with your friend's mom and one way with you, he will be confused, and, he will likely not know what to do. And, will likely respond to the person he spends more time with.

As for how to make your pup like you more: do fun things, make training fun, keep your training sessions short so you and your pup don't get frustrated. Play, have fun with your puppy, walk your puppy (good bonding).
 

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However, he's still not listening to me and he'll even blatantly ignore me when I tell him to not do something.
You taught him English and he still isn't listing to you? That's really surprising.

If by chance you have not taught him the ins and outs of human language, I would recommend teaching him specific commands. I see people all the time that say things to their dogs and simply expect them to understand and comply. I see it frequently with certain members of my family who just somehow expect their dog to understand every word that comes out of their mouth. To a dog, "Get off the counter" means the exact same thing as "Eskimo banana beard" because the dog has no clue how to understand our language. The only time verbal commands will work is when you pair a behavior to them through training.

A perfect example is my dog. When he was younger and less trained, I would tell him "leave it" all the time when he was getting into something he wasn't supposed to. Unsurprisingly, this did not do a damn thing. It wasn't until I taught him what I wanted him to do when I said "leave it" that he started to respond the way I wanted him too.

I would strongly suggest a positive reinforcement based training class of some kind (clicker training is ideal) to teach you the basics, and then you will have a better understanding of how to address your specific issues. Kikopup on youtube is a great resource as well. She has some great videos on "Building attention" that will help you get him to look to you for guidance.
 

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I made this post asking for advice, not a rude remark from you. He understand "Come here" and "Off" and "No". I'm done with this site because I don't need some smartass trying to tell me how to raise my dog. So thanks for nothing.
 

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I made this post asking for advice, not a rude remark from you. He understand "Come here" and "Off" and "No". I'm done with this site because I don't need some smartass trying to tell me how to raise my dog. So thanks for nothing.
I actually think that Swack gave really good advice. TONS of people think a dog understands what they are asking for, but the dog very often doesn't. Think of how many things the word NO is used for between people and how it is usually the context or body language or other words in the sentence that tell another person what to do after the "no"
So to a dog, "no" means very little unless followed by a specific command. Lets say a dog is jumping up on a visitor and barking. You say NO! To the dog, does that mean don't bark? Don't jump? Or some other action that he was doing at the moment you gave the command. So maybe you want it to mean in that case, don't jump. Much better to say "Sit" and ask for an incompatible behavior.
Because even if you solidly teach the dog that when you say NO when he is jumping that he shouldn't jump, that becomes what NO means and will mean nothing to him about say, leaving along food on the table (as an example)

You taught him English and he still isn't listing to you? That's really surprising.

If by chance you have not taught him the ins and outs of human language, I would recommend teaching him specific commands. I see people all the time that say things to their dogs and simply expect them to understand and comply. I see it frequently with certain members of my family who just somehow expect their dog to understand every word that comes out of their mouth. To a dog, "Get off the counter" means the exact same thing as "Eskimo banana beard" because the dog has no clue how to understand our language. The only time verbal commands will work is when you pair a behavior to them through training.

A perfect example is my dog. When he was younger and less trained, I would tell him "leave it" all the time when he was getting into something he wasn't supposed to. Unsurprisingly, this did not do a damn thing. It wasn't until I taught him what I wanted him to do when I said "leave it" that he started to respond the way I wanted him too.

I would strongly suggest a positive reinforcement based training class of some kind (clicker training is ideal) to teach you the basics, and then you will have a better understanding of how to address your specific issues. Kikopup on youtube is a great resource as well. She has some great videos on "Building attention" that will help you get him to look to you for guidance.
I'll even admit I am guilty of sometimes expecting a dog to understand a command before I have taught it well. I can be used to telling my own dog "Leave it" and him ignoring the object but then I'll have a newish foster dog trying to grab some trash or whatever and I'll shout leave it! and then laugh at myself when of course it does nothing at all.

If a dog is ignoring a command that you think he knows, then you (a person) haven't made it worth his while. You haven't taught him that obeying a command is better (more rewarding) than not obeying it. So go back to rewarding for every command the dog obeys and setting the dog up to succeed by not letting him ignore commands. For example, don't command "Come here" unless the dog is on a long line so you can make sure that the dog actually comes when called and then reward well with treats and praise when the dog does come to you.
 

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This is normal for yorkies.. They are terriers after all. Most ppl forget that, u have a rambunctious pup that will be very energetic for a couple of years. Do ur best and try to train the pup to not bite ppl's hands. Say no bite loudly every time he does and stop all play immediately..u have to teach the pup like his mother or litter mates would. This is a great link that will teach u how to train ur yorkie on a strict schedule, good luck

http://dawnsyorkies.weebly.com/training-tips.html
 
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