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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I'm looking for a new companion dog I have 2 cats, and I need cat-friendly dog Here are few things I'm looking for in a dog The most important thing is low prey drive I don't want a dog that would like to chase everything, Low to med energy needs, I can play with him and take him out I have a medium fenced yard, and daily walks but the problem here is that I have a pack of stray dogs in my neighborhood they're very friendly I feed them sometimes they're not always in my neighborhood but they usually come anyways and I don't know how are they gonna react if they saw him :3. I'm fine with a dog that needs a lot of attention in fact I don't want an independent dog, my cats are independent and they don't like a lot of attention they don't even set on my lap, never cuddle, very playfull and they hate being picked up ?, so I really want a cuddle buddy, not so energetic . Also I don't want a barker dog like poms I'm not really annoyed by it but the rest of the family are. And I want it to be friendly with strangers and easy going not the aggressive type Shedding isn't a big deal but it's better a minimal, grooming doesn't matter As a first time dog owner I don't know what it's like to bath a dog so it's better be a dog that is ok with water some breeds hate water. For the size, I prefer a medium to small Intelligence doesn't matter, but I need a very easy to train Oh and possibly not stubborn. So to make things short Low prey drive, low-med energy needs, (size) med to small, easy to train, cuddly, cat friendly, easy going, devoted...
 

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I would look into any of the small companion breeds, like Shi Tzus, Lhasa Apsos, Havanese, miniature poodle, Bichon, ect. Just be very, very careful who you choose for your breeder! These are very popular dog breeds because they are cute and sweet, and many bad breeders and puppy mills cash in on it. You want to look for a breeder who does something with their dogs (like conformation, obedience, agility,) and can show you titles their dog has won. You want a breeder who health tests (not just a vet's certification, OFA health scores) and who takes great care to socialize their puppies before they go to their new home. Avoid breeders who have more than one litter on the ground at a time (most good breeders only have one litter per year, maybe two), who say their dogs are AKC Champion bloodlines but don't actually have any titles on their breeding stock, who say their dogs are 'specially trained' and charge more money, charge more money for certain colors, or don't raise their puppies in their home.
 

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I'd also urge you to look into local rescues or shelters. Even if you go to an awesome breeder, the temperament of a puppy is always a little bit of a gamble. If you adopt an adult dog, you often have a much better idea of their personality and needs, especially if you can find a place that does fostering and/or temperament testing. Plus you get to skip all the worst parts of raising a puppy, haha. Breeders will sometimes have older pups they want to rehome, too, though you may have to find out about those through word-of-mouth.

Lillith has some great breed suggestions! I'd avoid terriers or terrier mixes in general, since most are pretty keen on chasing small fuzzies, but if you do look in shelters, keep in mind (especially with mixes) that not every dog "reads the manual" and you may stumble upon one that's a perfect fit. That and many rescue dogs' breeds are only a best guess, so you can't let that sway you too much.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks everybody that was very helpful. I've done a lot of researchs and I think the best fit for me is the cavalier King Charles and bichon frise , but I've heard that the bichon suffers from allergies like certain foods that could be even chicken for example. Is that true? And is the whole breed are so, or it depends and how can I prevent that. I really like the breed
 

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Cavaliers are lovely little dogs. Unfortunately, heart problems are rampant in the breed, as well as several other very serious health issues. I'd highly suggest looking over cavalierhealth.org - their formatting is awful, but the site has good information. Familiarize yourself on their health issues, because it's so, so important to go to a breeder who really works hard to breed healthy dogs with these guys.

Food allergies can happen in any breed, though some are more genetically prone to them than others. Your best bet is to find a breeder who knows their dogs' lines inside and out - that's parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles, etc. multiple generations back - and prioritize healthy, good-natured dogs. They should be doing health testing such as annual eye screening, patellar luxation (that's a knee problem common in small dogs) evaluation, and ALSO be able to tell you how common issues such as allergies are in your potential puppy's family. Luckily, there are a lot of food options for allergic dogs these days, so if there is an issue you and your vet can very likely find a solution that works for you.

Just another note: don't assume mixed breeds are automatically safe from these problems! If you decide to go to a mixed breed breeder (as opposed to a rescue), you want them to be just as conscientious about health as any good purebred breeder.
 

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Like DaySleepers said, Cavalier have heart problems in many, many lines, if not most. They're actually trying to breed it out by mixing in other healthier breeds its so bad. I mean, these heart problems can kill them at 2-3 years old. They are sweet little dogs, but if you go that route, make absolutely sure your breeder does some extensive health testing and can tell you the longevity of their stock, and has a good health guarantee (2+ years at minimum). You will have to do an incredible amount of research to find a good breeder, because unfortunately they are also very popular and bad breeders cash in on it.

As for Bichons and allergies, here is an article I found real quick that talks a bit about skin problems and allergies: http://www.bichonhealth.org/HealthInfo/SkinProblems.htm

A good breeder should be selecting their stock to keep it out of their lines, but sometimes genetics just work against them. There isn't much you can do to prevent it, but there are many ways to treat it. My own dog has environmental allergies, and with daily doses of Benadryl he is okay. They do get worse as they get older, though, it seems. There are also many food options if your dog develops a food allergy. So, basically, if you go the Bichon route, talk to the breeder about allergy issues in their lines, but know if your dog does develop allergies despite good breeding, there are relatively inexpensive ways to treat it or keep reactions from occurring, although some of the really specialized food can be expensive, but for a really small dog, food last a while.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I don't think there are any responsible breeders in my area that's why I'm worried of getting a dog that has a lot of genetic health issues ?.
 

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I always go the rescue route... I can never find responsible breeders for what I'm after, so if I'm going to get a crapshoot, at least it will be a cheaper one (and mixed breeds are less prone to health issues too) and I won't support an unethical breeder.

I have no idea if all puppies will get along with cats though - so far I've had 3, a golden retriever, a border collie mix, an eskie/lab/husky mix, and they've all been great with the cat. My 17yo cat actually likes playing with the puppy, go figure... and the puppy is really gentle with her (who would have thought for a husky mix). She's a tiny cat too at 7 lbs. So I'm guessing that unless you're getting a dog with high prey drive, it should be ok with a young puppy? Just got to make sure that there are some off limits areas for the cat. But again... I don't know. Hopefully someone is more helpful.

I want a third dog in the next 6 months or so and I've been looking at young adults though - rescues can tell you if the dogs are cat friendly.
 

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I always go the rescue route... I can never find responsible breeders for what I'm after, so if I'm going to get a crapshoot, at least it will be a cheaper one (and mixed breeds are less prone to health issues too) and I won't support an unethical breeder.
Not true. Just because they are mixed breeds does not make them healthier. Good, responsible breeders breed away from health issues. Crappy breeders don't care. Sometimes they produce healthy dogs, sometimes they produce genetic messes.
 

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The best way to ensure you're getting a dog that's good with cats, is to get an adult dog that's already proven good with cats.
 

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I don't think there are any responsible breeders in my area that's why I'm worried of getting a dog that has a lot of genetic health issues ?.
Some breeders do ship. You will probably have to take at least one trip to visit the breeder and his/her dogs, however. You can look up the breed clubs as a place to start looking for reputable breeders. Here is the Bichon club: http://bichon.org and here is the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Club: http://www.ckcsc.org

Theres two CKCS clubs that I found doing a quick google search. Just google "(whatever breed) club" and you should find something if you want to look at other breeds. They usually have ".org" in the URL, too, so if they have something else, thats probably not the official club.

If you can't find breeders, you can always go the rescue route. You will have to look a little harder to find exactly what you're looking for, and typically the small cute dogs go really quickly, so develop some relationships with rescues in your area so they can let you know when something that might fit comes along.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I don't think there are any responsible breeders in my area that's why I'm worried of getting a dog that has a lot of genetic health issues ?.
Some breeders do ship. You will probably have to take at least one trip to visit the breeder and his/her dogs, however. You can look up the breed clubs as a place to start looking for reputable breeders. Here is the Bichon club: http://bichon.org and here is the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Club: http://www.ckcsc.org

Theres two CKCS clubs that I found doing a quick google search. Just google "(whatever breed) club" and you should find something if you want to look at other breeds. They usually have ".org" in the URL, too, so if they have something else, thats probably not the official club.

If you can't find breeders, you can always go the rescue route. You will have to look a little harder to find exactly what you're looking for, and typically the small cute dogs go really quickly, so develop some relationships with rescues in your area so they can let you know when something that might fit comes along.
Thanks for the information ?
I think the best way is to take a trip as you said to the breeders or rescue groups
At least I know what I'm getting even though it's gonna be a long way haha
I didn't find any good breeder in my area, most of them are kennels or pet shops and there's NO WAY I'm going that way.
Anyways thanks for the advices guys ?
 

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If you decide to go the breeder route here is one for bichons. I am also looking for a bichon or other hypoallergenic breed as my hubby has allergies. I sent this breeder an email just to get some information. She messaged me back that her bichons are $2700. There was no way I could justify paying that kind of money even though I could afford it, with so many dogs in shelters looking for a home. I will just keep looking at petfinder until one comes along. But if you want to check out her website here it is. The puppies are gorgeous.
https://www.preludebichons.com/
 

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If you decide to go the breeder route here is one for bichons. I am also looking for a bichon or other hypoallergenic breed as my hubby has allergies. I sent this breeder an email just to get some information. She messaged me back that her bichons are $2700. There was no way I could justify paying that kind of money even though I could afford it, with so many dogs in shelters looking for a home. I will just keep looking at petfinder until one comes along. But if you want to check out her website here it is. The puppies are gorgeous.
https://www.preludebichons.com/
Unfortunately, good breeders pay for testing etc, and it's not cheap. I wonder how much they actually pay per puppy between parent testing, shots etc though... $2700 is pushing it, but I guess you're less likely to end up with a dog having health issues when they mature. Still no way I'd pay that for a puppy... $2000 *maybe* - with all testing.

But of course, lots of puppy mills and breeders still charge almost as much for their puppies. That's why I rescue, lol. My puppies both cost me $300.
 

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If you decide to go the breeder route here is one for bichons. I am also looking for a bichon or other hypoallergenic breed as my hubby has allergies. I sent this breeder an email just to get some information. She messaged me back that her bichons are $2700. There was no way I could justify paying that kind of money even though I could afford it, with so many dogs in shelters looking for a home. I will just keep looking at petfinder until one comes along. But if you want to check out her website here it is. The puppies are gorgeous.
https://www.preludebichons.com/
$2,700 isn't really unreasonable. A well bred dog is not cheap, and price often depends on the number of health tests the breeder performs, as well as if there were additional vet expenses, such as if the mother needed emergency care to deliver her puppies. It does sound expensive, but....I'm not really that surprised. I expect to pay between $1,500 - $3,000 for a puppy whose parents have the champion titles that this breeder has put time and effort into earning.
 
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