Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have an eight month old boxer husky mix. When I'm home he is good and listens pretty well. The minute I leave he starts destroying! Mostly the couches and sometimes the carpet. He has destroyed three couches so far! I tried ignoring him before I leave and after I get back for about five to ten minutes, that helped as far as him jumping all over me and knocking me over, but not for the destruction! Also the anti chew spray did not work at all, I actually think he liked it! I caught him twice and punished him, the behavior stopped for about a week and now he is back to destruction! I am taking him to training classes next week, I hope he just needs a little discipline. If not, what else can I do!?!?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
545 Posts
Sounds like some severe separation anxiety. Dogs are pack animals and it's really unnatural (to their minds) for them to be alone for long periods of time. You need to take him on a LOOONG walk or run or bike ride before you leave him home alone. That way, he'll be tired and it will make more sense to him that he's being left alone. He also needs a crate. No question.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I also have a pug..I actually bought the husky to keep my pug company! Haha and when I do leave it's only for an hour or two at a time! I will try walking him before I leave and see how that helps! Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,071 Posts
My puppy is 11 months old and I still cant leave her unsupervised in the house. Some of mine could be trusted at young ages, but they were rare. Training and exercise are important and I'd either crate her or keep her on a tie-down when you're not there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
529 Posts
Just wondering, why isn't he crated? It's very unsafe to leave a dog that young who has such tendencies loose in the house.

To be honest he just sounds like an under-exercised and bored puppy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
472 Posts
I agree with the above. He sounds bored and possibly under-exercised, and he's being given too much freedom. If you don't want your puppy to chew up your couch, don't let your puppy near the couch.

First, either put your dog in a crate when you're not around--one that is big enough for him to stand up and turn around in--or confine your dog to a limited area in your home. The limited area could be your living room, kitchen, bathroom, etc. But make sure that it is puppy-proofed. In other words, make sure that there's nothing within his reach that he can destroy, choke on or eat. It's helpful to purchase either a ex-pen (gates that form into a pen enclosure) or a babygate in order to section off the home. I have two gates that limit my puppy to the living room, 1/3 of my bedroom and my master bathroom. I have an additional smaller fence that encloses the TV set and wires so she can't get to them. Not the prettiest home decor, but it's temporary until I can trust her.

Second, invest in some thinking toys or some time-consuming toys. Kongs are great. They are made for heavy chewers and you can fill them with food items. The most readily suggested are peanut butter and plain yogurt, but you can pretty much stuff a Kong with anything dog edible. Freeze it and it'll last longer. The dog will be entertained for a good amount of time trying to get the food out. You can also serve his food inside a Kong wobbler or other toys that dispense food when the dog plays with the toy right before you leave. Also, provide him with acceptable chew toys--sturdy chew toys are the best. I would avoid anything with stuffing, and anything soft may not last too long.

Third, exercise him. Before you leave, tire him out with a nice, long walk.

Fourth, engage his mind. Pick up a book on positive training techniques and start working with him for short intervals each day. Engaging a dog's mind can also tire him out.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top