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I have a 5-month old beagle puppy. We had him since he was 1-month old. I haven't been training him much, I want to start training him actively since I can't make him listen to me. He guards his food and he becomes aggressive when we come too close. I am afraid he will grow up to be a bad dog so I want to actively train my dog now. I work in the night shift and I don't know what to do.

I don't know where to start. What to teach first and what to teach next. I've been watching multiple training guides on youtube but I feel I am not getting the information I need. I am currently looking for a trainer but I want to train my pup myself. He poops and pees in his crate as well. I really don't know where to start at this point. Please direct me to any forum link or thread that might help me please.
 

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I'm not the person to help you with all the issues like resource guarding, but as for where to start with training, this really helped me to get my pup to be patient and listen to me. Training further commands were made much easier once my pup knew some self control.

It's yer choice
 

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I would NOT recommend any techniques or methods of Cesar Milan. They are ill-conceived and quite often dangerous, especially if they're being applied by a novice dog owner.

There are much better more knowledgeable sources of info out there besides him. For example, Patricia McConnel's book "The Other End of the Leash" would be a good starting point. Also Jean Donaldson's book "MINE ! A Practical Guide to Resource Guarding in Dogs".
 

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While that article isn't the worst I've seen from Cesar Milan, it still heavily relies on the debunked idea that dogs are constantly challenging us for 'dominance' in the home and living with a dog means constantly having to find ways to make your relationship a fight you can 'win' or do silly things to prove you're an 'alpha'. Dogs do not have any kind of hierarchical pack structure among each other, let alone in their relationships with humans - wolves don't have a hierarchical pack structure, and they're what 'dominance theory' was originally based on, even though they're hugely behaviorally different than domestic dogs.

More specifically, in this case, eating before your dog will not do any harm, but it also won't do any good, either. It's completely irrelevant to dog training. All it does is reinforce the idea in the human that their relationship with their dog should be a constant battle, which is pretty sad in my opinion.

Backing away from the food bowl if your dog growls isn't inherently bad because you let the dog 'win'. It's showing the dog that you see their signals and you're respecting them, so they don't feel like next time they have to tell you off even more (possibly with their teeth) because you won't listen to a less intense warning. This doesn't mean you should be testing your dog's limits all the time by making them growl and then backing off, but if you accidentally push them to that point, often backing off is absolutely the best solution.

Here's what I'd suggest in the short term: feed your dog in a crate or pen so that he has a barrier between you and the food. Many dogs anxious about their food find this a little more comfortable, because no one can get into them easily to 'steal' anything, and it's safer for you because there's no bite risk if the dog does get upset enough to go that far (especially if you have young kids or visitors who don't know to be careful around him). Have a handful of high-value treats (more exciting than his food), and anytime you go by him (not close enough that he starts growling), toss one into the crate/pen for him. Don't linger, just toss one over and go about your business. This will help teach him that you being around when he's eating is a good thing because tasty goodies show up.

Outside of mealtimes, you can practice trading games - googling 'trading games dogs' or 'trading up dogs' gets some useful articles and videos for more details - where you 'trade' him less exciting toys or chews for more exciting toys or chews. This teaches him that giving his nice things to you is awesome, because you give him nicer things! This makes it easier to 'trade' him for things he shouldn't have (the mail, shoes, plastic packaging, etc.) without him guarding, and makes him less stressed overall with you being around his treasured items.

I second the recommendations for Mine! by Jean Donaldson, but for the general 'what do I train'? Definitely watch this video!


Lots of awesome, easy foundation behaviors for puppies - the thing I personally tend to teach first is their name, because there's nothing the pup can get wrong. You just say their name, then give them a treat. Do it a few times in a row, a few times a day, and boom, your dog thinks their name is awesome and starts looking at you when you say it! Great way to get started in diverting their attention from 'bad' behaviors, improving focus, and the foundation for a nice recall. Good luck!
 

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For resource guarding the food bowel this is what you do. This is the BEST video on the subject I have seen and it eliminates all the conflict:


As to the house breaking and peeing and pooping in the crate that is a far greater challenge. Assuming FIRST that he is healthy (no UTI etc.) you need to get the dog out frequently and make every time he pees or poops outside truly valuable. It might mean that is the only time he eats. It may come to that to get the job done and it may very well take months to accomplish your goal of house breaking. Never scold for going in the house.. interrupt and get him OUT.

Also, every time he goes to the bathroom in his crate (which should not have any bedding and should only be big enough for him to stand up in and turn around in) he is self reinforcing going to the bathroom in the crate.

As others have said.. Cesar Milan is a poor source of training information.
 

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Thank you, guys! It's truly appreciated! I just now need to adjust my schedule and properly give time for my pup.
 

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I also highly recommend staying away from Cesar Milan’s methods.
Was the puppy really only one month old when you got him? That’s Way to young to be away from Mom & siblings. He missed many social & behavioral lessons if that’s the case.
Please hire a trainer who only uses positive reinforcement methods ASAP or you are probably going to end up with many more issues on your hands and probably a “bad dog” as you labeled him. Resource guarding is not something you are going to solve by watching some videos or getting message board answers. (I’ve been a trainer for 15 years).
In the meantime, no meals should be fed in a bowl. As long as you are comfortable handing him food, you should be hand feeding, so you control the food, he has nothing to guard and your presence means he gets yummy food (not him afraid you’ll take his bowl away). Measure out his portion and put a few kibbles in your palm at a time for him to eat. Repeat until gone. In between hand feeding, you can also buy a treat ball that he can eat out of. Put food in it and he has to roll it around to get food out of it.
Where did he come from? Did they let him pee/poop in a cage or was he living in a cage?
 

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My husband and I just got a 2 year old rescue who is food aggressive. We're currently trying this method.

Food Aggression And What To Do About It | Cesar's Way
Please be very careful with Cesar Milan’s methods. There are so many things wrong with his methods. He does not have any formal education and thinks domestic dogs should be treated like wolves. His show is very deceiving and many dogs develop lots more issues because of his methods.
 

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We have always had dogs and raised the last three from new puppies to the end of their natural lives. We had one Beagle that we inherited as a young dog from a son who was transferred by the Navy and couldn’t take him. Beagles present unique training opportunities and this one had a rough start with us but became the sweetest friend and companion. All of our adult children have beagles and their stories are similar. Left to their own devices beagles will eat themselves to death.
Our Golden Doodle failed puppy kindergarten and he was never trained so that he was totally without his strong personality. He lived for 16 years and I will always consider him my best friend.
We have lost our minds and just brought home two 8 week old Labradoodles from different breeders (one each sex) and now 15 weeks. If you are of sound mind. DO NOT DO THIS.
All you have learned from your research about puppy training goes right out the window.
Just stay calm, speak softly, spend a lot of time together, be consistent and puppy-proof as much as possible. Take training slowly and methodically. We have had good luck with all natural chew sticks from Chewy’s.
 
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