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Discussion Starter #1
I can't believe how some people refuse to slow down for an animal crossing the street! I was driving on a small hwy and a black dog, maybe rotweiller mix, was crossing the street. He was able to avoid the cars on the side of the street I was on. But when he crossed over to the other side of the street opposite of me, a truck hit him! It was as if he did it on purpose! I was in the u-turn lane to go after him, so I my car light was shining on those lanes (it was night time), there were street lights since the dog was crossing a couple of feet past the stop lights and he was already on the road when the truck was far away, so I KNOW the driver saw him!

And the thing that pisses me off even more, he had one lane to his right and about three lanes to his left, no cars in front, behind or to his left or right, not even near him. And he hit the poor dog - it was so preventable as all he had to do was switch lanes. He didn't even slow down! It was as if he just went the same constant speed (about 50 mph) before, when he hit, and after he the poor dog. The dog didn't just run out into the street, he was confused so went a little slow and kind of stopped when the light of the truck was blinding him. There is absolutely no excuse for hitting him!

The dog got up and ran off, I don't think the truck ran over him, only hit him. I just heard a loud band but did not hear him yelp. I tried to drive after him and found him in a vacant lot. But when I opened the door, he ran off. Then I drove down a couple of feet and found him at a school and he still ran off.

Then after searching for about 20 minutes, I couldn't find him. The poor thing! He didn't seem to have legs broken by the look of him running, but he's probably got a couple of broken ribs.

And the thing that's so frustrating is he had a collar and tag and I just couldn't get to him! The poor dog looked so disoriented and scared.

I just can't believe some people will not slow down for an animal. I bet you those are the kind of people that would hit a person and drive off!
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
no i couldn't, I was so worried about the dog that I kept my eyes on him to go after him. The truck sped off. =(.

I really hope karma gets the driver in the truck.

did you get the license plate from the truck at all?
I'm curious now that you asked if I got the license plate of the truck - is there any legal action that can be taken when something like this is witnessed? I'm in TX. Thanks.
 

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Yea my sister was pretty upset 2 nights ago and asked if we should call the Animal Control or the Sheriff about what she saw. At about 2:00 in the afternoon she saw a Ford Focus run straight over a Chihuahua. She said the girl slowed down honked at the dog to get away and yelled out of her window, then just pressed on the gas when it didnt move and ran it straight over. She said it was instant, the dog was dead in a matter of seconds.

My sister went ballistic and chased the girl, tail gated her to the light and yelled at her and the b*tch just flipped her the bird. She got the license plate, and we called the Sheriff and the Humane Society the next day and the Sheriff said nothing could be done. They didnt get a complaint from the owners and that things like that happen every day. :mad: They said they would call the owner of the car to warn them but that was all they could do.

Bull crap huh? Lives of Animals will never be valued as much as they should. It just makes me sick... but there really isnt nothing that we can do other than hope that Karma comes around. That kind of crap just happens too much.

BTW, I'm in TX as well... South Texas, I havent read the laws or anything... but it apparently seems that there arent any for this kind of situation (In my area anyway...)
Nessa
 

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Definitely catch the plates when these things happen, if you can. Some people honestly don't care. Though, the one time my Smalls escaped me as a puppy and ran into the middle of a busy intersection, EVERY car slammed on it's breaks and stayed parked, blocking traffic, while I chased after her.
 

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Was it a pickup truck, or was it a semi?

In the latter case, I can actually understand not trying to avoid the dog. As horrible as it is, a fully loaded truck has a lot of inertia and a high center of gravity; unless they prepare from a couple hundred yards away, swerving or braking is likely to be disastrous.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
It was just a small pickup truck, and it wasn't like it was an f-150 or f-450 or anything like that. Just one of those "light duty" pickup trucks. I would have understood if it was like an 18-wheeler or something, but it wasn't.

chul3l3ies1126, that is awful! I can't believe people would do that. I just can't comprehend why anyone would want to deliberately hit something that is so innocent. Does it really satisfy them to hit and kill a living thing?

I really wish something can be done. I recall research being done years ago that showed people who deliberately hurt animals have a high potential of hurting or even killing people. And if you look at all the cases for many killers, they all started out experimenting on animals.
 

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It's too bad more can't, or isn't, done about these animal hit & runs :mad:
I KNOW accidents can & do happen, but that's when you stop to, at the VERY least, check on the animals condition!
 

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I knew a gal once that swerved to miss a dog in the road, lost control and hit two parked cars and a fire hydrant. Was in the hospital for two days. And the dog was killed by the car behind her.

The dog shouldnt have been out unsupervised to begin with. Your anger is misplaced------- it needs to be with the "owner" who willingly let the dog roam at night.

I have hit 2 dogs in my driving lifetime. One at night that came from the side of the road right in front of me, and the other at mid day where the owner was on one side of the road with his unleashed dog on the other, and he called his dog across the road in front of me. Killed both dogs. In the first case, any avoidance movements by me could have caused me to lose control and crash and with my family in the vehicle, I am not going to take any un-necessary risks to their safety. In the second case, the "owner" had a baseball bat with him, and I was not going to stop and try to explain to him why he shouldnt call his dog across the road in front of traffic.

Bottom line: if the dog is out unleashed and unsupervised, then expect it to be hit and killed. If you love them, control them.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I understand in given situations, it is not safe to swerve. In this case, there was no traffic and the driver had plenty of time - he wouldn't have had to swerve, but switch lanes like usual. The driver could have at least pulled over to check on the dog. But he didn't even slow down, it's not like I expected him to step on his breaks and risk losing control to avoid hitting the dog, but he was coming right after the dog - and again, he had plenty of time to slow down but didn't. It was in a lit area too.

And I do get angry at owners who let their dogs roam, but some dogs get off their leash sometimes because they see something and run after it. It makes me mad to see people let their dogs roam freely since there are cruel people in this world who like to do unspeakable things to animals. And you can't 100% train a dog not to leave its area, its in their nature to explore. Some people don't understand this.

I have lost my Yorkie a couple of times, but thank goodness she doesn't cross the street and stays in the subdivision. I was lucky to get her home safely.

And I wouldn't return any dog I find on the street, unless I can tell it looks like it got off its leash. I would definitely hand it over to a humane society and let them investigate if they would.
 

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The dog shouldnt have been out unsupervised to begin with. Your anger is misplaced------- it needs to be with the "owner" who willingly let the dog roam at night.
That really isn't a very fair or true statement. You have no idea why the dog was out, how it got out, etc, etc. Not to say that owners who allow their dogs to roam aren't irresponsible, but there are too many "what if"s in this situation. You even go so far as to accuse the owner of "willingly" letting the dog roam. None of us know how true that is.

Additionally, even if the owner was irresponsible, the man in the truck clearly had other options. I understand not endangering one's life to avoid hitting a dog--but this man's life would not have been endangered at all, or so it is assumed from the circumstances.

Not trying to start an argument here.. Just a little confused as to why you'd accuse the OP of misplacing anger given the explanation she provided.
 

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Sickening!! :mad:

The dog shouldnt have been out unsupervised to begin with. Your anger is misplaced------- it needs to be with the "owner" who willingly let the dog roam at night.
Of course no responsible owner willingly allows their dog to roam busy streets. But dogs do sometimes escape in spite of good training. The most terrifying moment of my life was when our Dixon broke free from her leash when she was about a year old to run after a squirrel, then ran out of the subdivision into a busy street where cars fly by at 60+ mph. Until then, we thought her recall was nearly perfect... but she happily ignored us... and would have been mowed down if a driver hadn't been compassionate enough to slow down so as not to hit her.

Shortly after that incident, we began house-hunting to find a home that was far, far away from any busy street. We found one that was $100,000 more than our old house, but that was the price we were willing to pay for the safety of our dear pup. But I'm so VERY very grateful that the woman who could have easily killed Dixon and blamed Dixon and/or me, her owner, was compassionate enough to simply press on the brake pedal so as not to take my precious baby away from me.
any avoidance movements by me could have caused me to lose control and crash
Wow. I'm very thankful that you don't live in my neighborhood.
 

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We have had dogs all our lives, and none of them "got out" or "escaped".
We currently have a retired Guide, an active Guide, and a Guide pup in training at our house. We know where they are at all times. They are closely supervised day and night. When outside they are supervised in an enclosed yard or they are on leash. Even while relieving. Yes, while it is raining and snowing too. My wife is out with her Guide all over town at college and her volunteer position for over 8 hours a day with no problems of "getting loose" or "running off". And yes, there is such a thing as 100% reliability-----but it begins with the person who handles the dog.

Now, if a blind woman can keep her dog under control at all times, why is it that sighted people cannot seem to do so? Are there that many incompetent dog "owners" out there? If a dog is out running the streets, then it is the choice of the "owner" to allow it. Any dog other than a stray that is loose is loose because the "owner" willingly let it be so, through negligence or stupidity. Either way, the result is the same.

Having been in such a position myself, the driver of the vehicle had many options, and chose the best one to keep control of their vehicle to prevent a worse situation. As to not stopping, those knowledgeable about animals know that one does not approach an injured or scared animal due to the risk of defensive actions by the animal.

And I am also thankful I dont live in your neighborhood. Uncontrolled and untrained dogs all over would be a great concern for a service dog user.

Bottom line: if you love them, control them. Always and in all situations. If you cant do that, then give your dog to someone who can.

Now, you can get all flaming mad at me; no big deal. In the real world, there is Truth, and there is Untruth. If you choose to follow Untruth, thats fine. But I will not choose Untruth simply because many others do.
 

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I'm sorry, but the real truth is that the REAL world is not 100% perfect & try as we might, accidents DO happen. People can, & do love their dogs & other pets, yet accidents can happen.
Please, don't try to make others here out to be unknowledgable about dogs just becuz they are emotional & WILL stop to check on the condition of a hurt animal, especially one they've just hit with their vehicle.
At the very least, they should stop & call animal control.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I don't really believe people can train their dogs to perfection. It is in a dog's nature to run after something he/she sees. To believe that a dog can be trained to never leave, to never chase after anything, to never dig a hole and run out the yard, to be perfect and sit perfectly still.... is to be naive.

Some people will experience dogs getting away from them and some won't, no matter how much you've trained them, they are unpredictable.

And I hope people know that there are weirdos out there who choose to hit an animal for some sick thrill they get. That's why there are so many animal cruelty cases. Some people simply enjoy running over animals. And I'm sure that some people who hit a dog are disappointed that they didn't kill them. Some people are responsible and call Animal Control, some people get scared and feel bad about hitting an animal. But people do not always make a decision to keep the best control of their vehicle. I would think that in a lot of situations, the driver is in more danger if he hit the dog than if he avoided it. But like I said, some people get off on being the "higher being."
 

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{Quote}It is in a dog's nature to run after something he/she sees. To believe that a dog can be trained to never leave, to never chase after anything, to never dig a hole and run out the yard, to be perfect and sit perfectly still.... is to be naive.{Endquote}

Not naive at all. It appears that you have never dealt with or been around a professionally raised, trained, and handled service dog. When working they exhibit behavior that amazes most folks. Properly trained service dogs do not leave, do not dig, do not run after something they see, do not chase after anything (unless it is playtime), do sit perfectly still, and have manners that cause most parents to become embarassed of their children. When it is playtime, you bet they run and jump and tug and pull. Within boundries they have been taught. It can be done if one is cares enough and is serious about keeping their dog safe. All it takes is time and dedication. As I asked before, if a blind woman can have no trouble with her Guide dogs, why cant the normally sighted do the same?
 

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Not naive at all. It appears that you have never dealt with or been around a professionally raised, trained, and handled service dog. When working they exhibit behavior that amazes most folks. Properly trained service dogs do not leave, do not dig, do not run after something they see, do not chase after anything (unless it is playtime), do sit perfectly still, and have manners that cause most parents to become embarrassed of their children. When it is playtime, you bet they run and jump and tug and pull. Within boundaries they have been taught. It can be done if one is cares enough and is serious about keeping their dog safe. All it takes is time and dedication. As I asked before, if a blind woman can have no trouble with her Guide dogs, why cant the normally sighted do the same?
Service dogs spend one to two hours per day, for months on end, to attain that extreme level of training. Do you really think no one should own a dog unless they have the time and money to put into that intense level of training?

It's great that you have the benefit of being able to spend so much time every day training service dogs, but the vast majority of people don't have that luxury. Sorry, but you're being unrealistic to suggest that anyone who doesn't put hours per day into training their dog to "service dog standards" should be barred from owning a dog at all.

Another perspective... canine officers are trained to pursue and apprehend suspects, even if that means crossing a busy road to do so. By your logic, that dog deserves to be mowed down in all circumstances because he's doing exactly what he was well-trained to do.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I understand where you are coming from. But many people do not train their dogs to be a service dog, they are their companions (not to say that people with service dogs do not see them as a companion). You just can't apply that type of special situation to a more common situation.

And dogs will be dogs. And not all breeds can be successfully trained that way. And I still believe that you cannot change their true nature, regardless if they are a service dog or not.

And yes, many times when a dog gets loose, you can review everything and find negligence somewhere. But a lot of times you don't find that negligence.

I am open to what you are saying, I just hope that you can be open to what I and many others are arguing too.

And please don't tell me you don't believe that some people "aim" for animals crossing the street, as is evident by chul's post.

I am lucky to have not run into your situation and got into a car accident trying to avoid hitting an animal crossing the street. And I understand that after what you went through, you have a completely different perspective. And yes, many people cannot possibly avoid an animal and end up hurting them, but many people will deliberately do so just for a cheap sick thrill.

And another comment: Look at those two vegas guys (what's their name) who spent a good time of their life training white tigers, only to end up getting mauled by one. Again, you cannot erase any being's true nature.
 

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I have had dogs get away from me. One of my dogs got run over on the highway. If I had known that he would figure out how to climb the fence, I would have made other fencing arrangements.

I imagine there are lots of people around that it has happened to at least once, if only once.

Having said that, I am one of those people who would be running over the reflector poles along the bar ditch to avoid hitting an animal.

I hit a dog once late at night. I did not run him completely over. I pulled over on the side of the road and spent about 15 minutes looking for him on the other side of the highway, as that is where he was headed. Whether or not I would have handled him had I found him, I don't know. (Maybe if I could see that he had tags?)

What really disturbs me is when someone runs over a dog and leaves the body laying in the middle of the street. I have moved a couple of dogs off of the highway, solely so that if the owners found them, they would at least have something to bury.
 
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