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Hi Everyone!

I am picking up my puppy this sunday and I am SO anxious and EXCITED! He is a 7 week old maltipoo. I am very nervous as I want to make sure to keep him healthy and not over exercised and yada yada (I have read so many books and there is just SO much information out there!).

I have everything prepared and set up for his arrival. I was just wondering if any of you had any advice for me for the first couple days/weeks home? He will only be 2 lbs and that makes me so nervous because he will be so fragile and vulnerable. I have heard horror stories about puppies dying because they were over worked and over exercised. This is my first puppy ever. Any advice from previous toy or tiny dog owners would be so appreciated :)

Thank you!
Abbie
 

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Ideally puppies should stay with their litter until 8 weeks.. but ideal breeders don't breed and sell mixed breed puppies either. Anyway... Take him to the vet for a check up first thing. Make sure you get him his vaccinations or finish the series that have already been started. Don't take him to any areas that lots of dogs may frequent. He will be extra susceptible to disease until he is about 16 weeks old. His vaccinations may or may not take effect until the final booster shot, so you really don't want to take a chance.. especially with things like Parvo. This is not to say that you can't socialize him though. You CAN take him to friends homes that have adult dogs that are up to date on their vaccinations. You CAN take him to places to meet people (carrying him if you need to). I would also enroll in puppy obedience classes, it will be good for him and good for you and will help you to bond even more than you already will.

Start house training right away. Keep an eye on him at all times, and if you see him going to the bathroom in the house, hurry him outside. DO NOT hit him or push his nose in it. This will only confuse him, hurt your relationship with him, and make him more likely to sneak off and poop/pee out of your sight in the house. When he is outside, and he successfully goes potty, THROW A PARTY! Tons of praise and make sure to give him a really delicious treat (hotdogs work well, or if you want something more nutritious you can give him sliced up dog food roll- sold at pet stores, they look like big salamis). The better the party the more likely he will be to want to repeat the behavior that caused it.

If you have trouble getting him to even think about squatting outside in the first place, keep him crated or otherwise contained so that he does not have the chance to go to the bathroom in the house (what worked for me was keeping my puppy up on the couch next to me and not letting her get down). Then in about 10 minute intervals, pick him up, take him outside and set him the grass. Let him walk around a bit, if he doesn't go after a few minutes, pick him up and bring him back in to continue being contained until he is ready to go potty. When he can't hold it any more, he will go outside, and you can throw your party. :) Pretty soon you will have a potty trained dog.

Also make sure that you have plenty of toys and chews for him. He will start teething in a few months and will want to make your possessions his chew toys. When you see this, redirect him to a toy or chew of his own. Rawhides are not a very good choice of chew as they are not digestible (it's leather...beef hide) and can cause him to choke or have a bowl obstruction. Real cooked bones are not a good option either as they will splinter when chewed and the sharp bone shards can cause internal damage. Try Bully Sticks (100% meat.. bull penis actually!! Gross but does love them and they are safe! Get the odor free ones.. bestbullysticks.com has great prices.) or deer antlers. Kong toys stuffed with something yummy (peanut butter, canned pumpkin, yogurt, canned dog food) and frozen can be a great way to occupy his time for quite a while. Just be sure not to give him too much (unless you use canned dog food), he's a puppy and will need to have good nutrition to grow properly.

Good luck with your new pup.


ETA: Also, don't be surprised if he doesn't want to walk on a leash for a while. Most puppies take a while to get used to collars/leashes (and stairs and everything else new in their world) and will sometimes just drag their feet when put on one. Put a collar on him and leave it on so he can get used to it for a while. It should help him feel more comfortable when you take him out to potty, so he won't be distracted by this scary new thing on his neck.
 

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Congratulations! I just got my own Maltipoo puppy, Lilly, two weeks ago, and she is the most amazing thing that I could ever imagine. However, I was not able to bring her home until she was 12 weeks because she is such a small puppy, so that seems somewhat worrisome that you could pick yours up at just 7 weeks... First of all, please disregard the "ideal breeders don't breed and sell mixed breed puppies either" comment found above - That is just an outright cruel thing to say - Like, why would you even respond if you feel that way? But before I get too caught up in that, there is a lot that I can probably share with you based on my past two weeks with Lilly.

First of all, make sure that you receive with your puppy all of his/her veterinary records so that you are able to show those to your own veterinarian, with whom you should have an appointment within two days of bringing your puppy home. When I picked up Lilly, she came with her own crate, as well as a week's worth of the food she had been eating and a small amount of SPRING water. If these are not going to be provided, be sure to contact the breeder so that you can have the food your puppy is used to ahead of time. It was also advised to me to bring a product called Nutrical for Puppies, which you may or may not be familiar with - it is simply a high-calorie nutritional supplement that is especially great for small dogs like ours whose blood sugar levels can drop all too quickly. I also brought Lilly some baby wipes, extra newspaper, a bottle of spring water, and a blanket, but in my case, they were not necessary.

When I brought Lilly home, she was somewhat shy and curious, as was to be expected. However, she grew accustomed to her new life very quickly. I've been working on her potty training, and I know there are a lot of strict rules about crate training, puppy pad, etc., but I wanted to just teach her to go only outside, so I just take her out very frequently. Fortunately, the poodle half of her makes her very smart, so she has already learned as much as she possibly could (I read that puppies cannot be truly housetrained until at least 6 months). Each time I take her out, I place her on grass, and say "Go potty!" in a high pitch, and she definitely recognizes some part of that. I found that she didn't like the puppy biscuits I tried rewarding her with at first (immediately after going to the bathroom outside - any later, and it loses its power of positive reinforcement), so I decided to try giving her boiled chicken breast diced or shredded into tiny pieces, and she LOVED it. It made all the difference, and giving her chicken is what I credit her learning so quickly to.

Inside, she is just a little ball of fun. She is very quick and energetic, so be prepared to always be on the lookout, and always look down before stepping heavily, as Lilly just pops up out of nowhere when I'm walking away for even just a second. I treat her like she's my child, so she has her own little shelving unit filled with toys of all kinds, and she really does love them all. Her favorite is probably her pink Nylabone wishbone, but she also adores her stuffed squeak toys, so it's probably a good idea to have a variety of both. Even if you're not trying to spoil your puppy, it's smart to have a plethora of toys because in my case, I always have some toy on hand to distract her with when she is teething on the furniture or chewing on my tennis shoe laces. I should also mention that I'm pretty sure she's learned her name, which is probably primarily due to how often I say it while we are going for walks.

All in all, getting Lilly was the greatest decision I've ever made (I'm only 20, so I haven't made that many on my own). I'm a full-time student, but I have plenty of time for her before, between, and after classes. You probably have a crate all ready, and I was so prepared to try to put her in a crate at night time, but it broke my heart to leave her in such a confined space. So, the first night, she slept with me. Obviously, she did have an accident in my bed, but washing the sheets a few extra times is well worth having an adorable little puppy to cuddle with. BUT, I am able to do this because I sleep in one place all night long, and I never roll or move at all throughout the night. If you are known to move at all, you probably should leave your puppy in his/her crate because you do not want to risk crushing him/her during the night, even just for a second - just too risky. We go for walks every single day for at least half an hour, and she never seems to be overly tired or even nearly that at all. I do pick her up at any heavy traffic areas, and I haven't socialized her with any dogs outside of those owned by my family. I haven't even introduced her to my family's Golden Retriever (she did meet my sisters' terrier mix, Cockapoo, and Labradoodle) because dogs are just too unpredictable, and better safe than sorry.

Most importantly, Good Luck! If your puppy is anything like Lilly, you have so much to look forward to - Have an ah-mazing time!
 

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Little dogs can have trouble regulating their own body temperatures, so be careful to keep her warm:) might need to get some sweaters if its getting cold where you live.

Very small dogs need to eat often, as their blood sugar can drop easily, so make sure there is always a little food/kibble/snacks around to feed every couple hours.

When we got our yorkie, she was 2 lbs, and I was so nervous to be caring for something so tiny!! but you can do it. The other thing to be careful about is that when that little, they can be quiet when they walk, which makes accidents easy to happen...just check around you often to make sure there isnt a teeny, quiet puppy behind you when you step:) and the teeeny puppies can squeeze through tiny door openings, etc so be careful on that.

Have fun!

ps....very small dogs can have easily collapsible tracheas, so be sure to walk her on a harness and leash, not collar and leash, to protect her little trachea.
 

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First of all, please disregard the "ideal breeders don't breed and sell mixed breed puppies either" comment found above - That is just an outright cruel thing to say - Like, why would you even respond if you feel that way?
Good breeders breed to better their breed and health test. While a few mixed breed breeders do this, very few do this most don't. So no ideal breeders don't breed mixed breed dogs unless for a purpose.

I too would be careful of hypothermia and hypoglycemia. You may want to buy some nutrical paste just in case your pup doesn't want to snack often.
 

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Congratulations! I just got my own Maltipoo puppy, Lilly, two weeks ago, and she is the most amazing thing that I could ever imagine. However, I was not able to bring her home until she was 12 weeks because she is such a small puppy, so that seems somewhat worrisome that you could pick yours up at just 7 weeks... First of all, please disregard the "ideal breeders don't breed and sell mixed breed puppies either" comment found above - That is just an outright cruel thing to say - Like, why would you even respond if you feel that way? But before I get too caught up in that, there is a lot that I can probably share with you based on my past two weeks with Lilly.

First of all, make sure that you receive with your puppy all of his/her veterinary records so that you are able to show those to your own veterinarian, with whom you should have an appointment within two days of bringing your puppy home. When I picked up Lilly, she came with her own crate, as well as a week's worth of the food she had been eating and a small amount of SPRING water. If these are not going to be provided, be sure to contact the breeder so that you can have the food your puppy is used to ahead of time. It was also advised to me to bring a product called Nutrical for Puppies, which you may or may not be familiar with - it is simply a high-calorie nutritional supplement that is especially great for small dogs like ours whose blood sugar levels can drop all too quickly. I also brought Lilly some baby wipes, extra newspaper, a bottle of spring water, and a blanket, but in my case, they were not necessary.

When I brought Lilly home, she was somewhat shy and curious, as was to be expected. However, she grew accustomed to her new life very quickly. I've been working on her potty training, and I know there are a lot of strict rules about crate training, puppy pad, etc., but I wanted to just teach her to go only outside, so I just take her out very frequently. Fortunately, the poodle half of her makes her very smart, so she has already learned as much as she possibly could (I read that puppies cannot be truly housetrained until at least 6 months). Each time I take her out, I place her on grass, and say "Go potty!" in a high pitch, and she definitely recognizes some part of that. I found that she didn't like the puppy biscuits I tried rewarding her with at first (immediately after going to the bathroom outside - any later, and it loses its power of positive reinforcement), so I decided to try giving her boiled chicken breast diced or shredded into tiny pieces, and she LOVED it. It made all the difference, and giving her chicken is what I credit her learning so quickly to.

Inside, she is just a little ball of fun. She is very quick and energetic, so be prepared to always be on the lookout, and always look down before stepping heavily, as Lilly just pops up out of nowhere when I'm walking away for even just a second. I treat her like she's my child, so she has her own little shelving unit filled with toys of all kinds, and she really does love them all. Her favorite is probably her pink Nylabone wishbone, but she also adores her stuffed squeak toys, so it's probably a good idea to have a variety of both. Even if you're not trying to spoil your puppy, it's smart to have a plethora of toys because in my case, I always have some toy on hand to distract her with when she is teething on the furniture or chewing on my tennis shoe laces. I should also mention that I'm pretty sure she's learned her name, which is probably primarily due to how often I say it while we are going for walks.

All in all, getting Lilly was the greatest decision I've ever made (I'm only 20, so I haven't made that many on my own). I'm a full-time student, but I have plenty of time for her before, between, and after classes. You probably have a crate all ready, and I was so prepared to try to put her in a crate at night time, but it broke my heart to leave her in such a confined space. So, the first night, she slept with me. Obviously, she did have an accident in my bed, but washing the sheets a few extra times is well worth having an adorable little puppy to cuddle with. BUT, I am able to do this because I sleep in one place all night long, and I never roll or move at all throughout the night. If you are known to move at all, you probably should leave your puppy in his/her crate because you do not want to risk crushing him/her during the night, even just for a second - just too risky. We go for walks every single day for at least half an hour, and she never seems to be overly tired or even nearly that at all. I do pick her up at any heavy traffic areas, and I haven't socialized her with any dogs outside of those owned by my family. I haven't even introduced her to my family's Golden Retriever (she did meet my sisters' terrier mix, Cockapoo, and Labradoodle) because dogs are just too unpredictable, and better safe than sorry.

Most importantly, Good Luck! If your puppy is anything like Lilly, you have so much to look forward to - Have an ah-mazing time![/QUOTE]

Thank you so much! It is so good hearing from another maltipoo owner. I definitely feel no judgement from you! I am very nervous about bringing him home at 7 weeks but the breeder said he is fully weaned and ready to go. Always wanting to get out of his pen and play with someone. I did pick up some nutrical as I heard that is good to use as well, especially him being so tiny. She said he is very smart and he knows his name and fully responds to it. (I have been planning on getting a puppy from her liter for months now so when he was born I told her to call him Gio) I am 22 and also a student. I am in graduate school and out of the house for 2 full days a week, but besides that I am always home. I also live with my boyfriend who is also a graduate student and he is always home. So we feel like we will be able to be very attentive to gio and his needs. I would love to talk to you more - thank you!
 

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Little dogs can have trouble regulating their own body temperatures, so be careful to keep her warm:) might need to get some sweaters if its getting cold where you live.

Very small dogs need to eat often, as their blood sugar can drop easily, so make sure there is always a little food/kibble/snacks around to feed every couple hours.

When we got our yorkie, she was 2 lbs, and I was so nervous to be caring for something so tiny!! but you can do it. The other thing to be careful about is that when that little, they can be quiet when they walk, which makes accidents easy to happen...just check around you often to make sure there isnt a teeny, quiet puppy behind you when you step:) and the teeeny puppies can squeeze through tiny door openings, etc so be careful on that.

Have fun!

ps....very small dogs can have easily collapsible tracheas, so be sure to walk her on a harness and leash, not collar and leash, to protect her little trachea.
Thanks! When we are not with him one-on-one but still in the house I plan on keeping him in a big play pen in our living room so we can avoid accidents of stepping on him (god forbid) and anything else. Is it okay if I feed him as much as he wants because he is so tiny?
 

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Ideally puppies should stay with their litter until 8 weeks.. but ideal breeders don't breed and sell mixed breed puppies either. Anyway... Take him to the vet for a check up first thing. Make sure you get him his vaccinations or finish the series that have already been started. Don't take him to any areas that lots of dogs may frequent. He will be extra susceptible to disease until he is about 16 weeks old. His vaccinations may or may not take effect until the final booster shot, so you really don't want to take a chance.. especially with things like Parvo. This is not to say that you can't socialize him though. You CAN take him to friends homes that have adult dogs that are up to date on their vaccinations. You CAN take him to places to meet people (carrying him if you need to). I would also enroll in puppy obedience classes, it will be good for him and good for you and will help you to bond even more than you already will.

Start house training right away. Keep an eye on him at all times, and if you see him going to the bathroom in the house, hurry him outside. DO NOT hit him or push his nose in it. This will only confuse him, hurt your relationship with him, and make him more likely to sneak off and poop/pee out of your sight in the house. When he is outside, and he successfully goes potty, THROW A PARTY! Tons of praise and make sure to give him a really delicious treat (hotdogs work well, or if you want something more nutritious you can give him sliced up dog food roll- sold at pet stores, they look like big salamis). The better the party the more likely he will be to want to repeat the behavior that caused it.

If you have trouble getting him to even think about squatting outside in the first place, keep him crated or otherwise contained so that he does not have the chance to go to the bathroom in the house (what worked for me was keeping my puppy up on the couch next to me and not letting her get down). Then in about 10 minute intervals, pick him up, take him outside and set him the grass. Let him walk around a bit, if he doesn't go after a few minutes, pick him up and bring him back in to continue being contained until he is ready to go potty. When he can't hold it any more, he will go outside, and you can throw your party. :) Pretty soon you will have a potty trained dog.

Also make sure that you have plenty of toys and chews for him. He will start teething in a few months and will want to make your possessions his chew toys. When you see this, redirect him to a toy or chew of his own. Rawhides are not a very good choice of chew as they are not digestible (it's leather...beef hide) and can cause him to choke or have a bowl obstruction. Real cooked bones are not a good option either as they will splinter when chewed and the sharp bone shards can cause internal damage. Try Bully Sticks (100% meat.. bull penis actually!! Gross but does love them and they are safe! Get the odor free ones.. bestbullysticks.com has great prices.) or deer antlers. Kong toys stuffed with something yummy (peanut butter, canned pumpkin, yogurt, canned dog food) and frozen can be a great way to occupy his time for quite a while. Just be sure not to give him too much (unless you use canned dog food), he's a puppy and will need to have good nutrition to grow properly.

Good luck with your new pup.


ETA: Also, don't be surprised if he doesn't want to walk on a leash for a while. Most puppies take a while to get used to collars/leashes (and stairs and everything else new in their world) and will sometimes just drag their feet when put on one. Put a collar on him and leave it on so he can get used to it for a while. It should help him feel more comfortable when you take him out to potty, so he won't be distracted by this scary new thing on his neck.
Thank you for your input. Reading what you said reassures me I will be okay. I have bought all the different chew toys and treats and everything else you said. I believe I have a good grip on positive reinforcement. I also want to put him in a puppy class as soon as he's old enough. I will definitely probably still be posting in here because I just want what is best for my puppy and him to be healthy and happy! I hope the 7 weeks thing isn't a HUGE deal. I kind of want to get him out of where he is because it is crazy there.
 

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Why would you pay your hard earned money to get a puppy from a breeder who has a less then ideal puppy raising facility?

You realize that by giving this less then ideal person money, you're allowing her to continue to raise puppies in that crazy environment, as you yourself just said.

As a consumer, I personally only would support a breeder who did things I was comfortable with, including health testing, showing, titling, etc.

If you want the feeling of rescuing a dog, there's always your local shelter or rescue. Puppy mills are busted all the time and you could probably get the same quality puppy as well as having that feeling that you rescued a dog in need.

Just an idea for you to consider before you pick up your underaged puppy.
 

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Why would you pay your hard earned money to get a puppy from a breeder who has a less then ideal puppy raising facility?

You realize that by giving this less then ideal person money, you're allowing her to continue to raise puppies in that crazy environment, as you yourself just said.

As a consumer, I personally only would support a breeder who did things I was comfortable with, including health testing, showing, titling, etc.

If you want the feeling of rescuing a dog, there's always your local shelter or rescue. Puppy mills are busted all the time and you could probably get the same quality puppy as well as having that feeling that you rescued a dog in need.

Just an idea for you to consider before you pick up your underaged puppy.
Rude. I understand what you are saying, but that is all YOUR opinion and what YOU would do. I am not you, and by the way you're attacking me I wouldn't want to be anything like you. You have no idea what the price is of the puppy and what the breeder is providing me with. You have no idea because you didn't ask, you just rushed to conclusions. You can take your rude comments somewhere else because I wil not let you make me feel inferior or bad about my decision. I came here for advice. If you want to "bash" someone, do it elsewhere.
 

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Abbie, we aren't so much being judgemental of you as the 'greeder' who is selling you the pup.

Good Breeders NEVER let thier pups go home before 8 weeks and many good toy breeders wait unti l10-12 weeks.

Good breeders health test BOTH parents for all known conditions common to their breeds. At minimum the parents should be CERF and OFA certified clear of Progressive retinal Atrophy, Thyroid conditions, Glaucoma, Heart condition (both toy poodles and MAltese are very prone to mitrial valve and other such heart conditions that can be passed from parent to pups) and Elbow displacia and Patella Luxation. Thereare several other serious conditions that the parents should be cleared of, you can view them here Poodles and Maltese . Please read through both site carefully, many of these conditions can result in death or severe pain for the dogs entire life.

I know you're excited about your puppy, but an educated/informed puppy buyer is a puppy buyer that won't fall into the trap of bad breeders.

As someone who has fallen into the trap of a bad/irresponsible breeder and watched her wonderful pup suffer and die a slow painful death I'm just trying to spare you the pain I've suffered.
 

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Well I just wanted to let everyone know that I called the breeder and I asked to pick him up a week later. She was okay with it, so I will get him at 8 weeks. I just want what is best for him. I want him to be as happy and as healthy as possible.
 

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That's great news! I think that's a very wise decision on your part. It does worry me about the breeder, but what's done is done, so now, just focus on being the best possible Mom to your puppy as possible. I've been through so much pet trauma throughout the past year and a half that I've realized the most important thing is just to enjoy every moment you have with your dog to the fullest, and to love them as much as you possibly can! I wish you the best of luck! As I said earlier, Lilly has made me the happiest girl in the world!
 

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CFirst of all, please disregard the "ideal breeders don't breed and sell mixed breed puppies either" comment found above - That is just an outright cruel thing to say - Like, why would you even respond if you feel that way?
Work at a shelter for two years. You will see why I feel that way.
 

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Just a reminder of the posting rules ; Please do not use colored font, it's difficult to read and gives some of a headache.

Members should post in a way which is consistent with "normal writing". Users should not post excessive numbers of emoticons, large, small or colored text, etc. Similarly, users should not SHOUT or use excessive punctuation (e.g. ! and ?) in topic titles or posts. Users consistently abusing this will be warned.

Please do NOT use colored font
 

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Oh, did I come off as rude? If so, I didn't mean to.

I thought people posted on here to get advice, and when you said that you were concerned about the environment that your dog was coming from, on top of the fact that you were getting him at seven weeks, that was enough to make me want to warn you.

Apparently, you have this whole thing figured out, and I wish you luck.

ps- Carla, sorry you had to learn the hard way. So many people do. Then, they think all breeders are bad. The OP hopefully won't have to learn the hard way like you did.
 

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Thanks! When we are not with him one-on-one but still in the house I plan on keeping him in a big play pen in our living room so we can avoid accidents of stepping on him (god forbid) and anything else. Is it okay if I feed him as much as he wants because he is so tiny?
I did. I just leave food out all day for my tiny dog. As long as they aren't getting overweight, I think its ok. And if you crate him and leave him home for a long time alone, be sure to leave food where he can get to it.

You will have so much fun with him, Im sure!
 

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Free feeding makes it MUCH harder to potty train, scheduled feeding make it much easier as BM's become more predictable. Better to feed him 3x a day now (breakfast, lunch and dinner) and reduce it to two later than to free feed him.
 
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