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Discussion Starter #1
I found him up for adoption!
"5 month old Newfoundland/Great Pyrenese puppy. He is a good dog, but we just do not have the time for him. He needs somewhere that he can run and play, in which our yard is just not big enough. Tyson loves to be outdoors and run and play, but he also likes to be inside with people."

What can you guys tell me about this breed/s besides they are big! LOL
 

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The good, they are loyal and affectionate with their chosen humans.
The pyrs are flock guardians and are an INDEPENDENT breed, meant to work guarding the sheep without aid from a human. They ARE trainable but the trainer must understand the ability and propensity to make their own decisions so to be patient when working with this breed. They are protective of their homes.
The newfs are usually easy going and true water dogs, happy to be given affection and goodies and are happy doing water rescue work, carting etc.

So, it's kind of a crapshoot which side of the two breeds you get here. The givens: he will be huge, he will have a coat that requires a LOT of grooming and upkeep (the more daily brushing you do, the less heavy grooming), and he will not be a dog you can leave out all day "guarding" the back yard.

I have friends that have pyrs and they love them to death. They are great dogs, but they are on a working farm. Do some research and see if you can figure out a way to adapt the needs of the dog (exercise, mental stimulation) etc to your life. If you don't think you can then don't get the dog.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
and he will not be a dog you can leave out all day "guarding" the back yard.

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why can't I leave it in the back yard with my other dog? That is what we usually do while we are at work? We have a 6' privacy fenced in large back yard!
 

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If he takes after the PYr, and you live in an "busy" area..being behind a fence guarding the area all day can create extreme frustration in your dog, any dog really, but especially a guardian dog.

I would recommend you try a forum dedicated to one or both of these breeds to assess the real needs of the dog. Since the Pyr is the one that "could" be more of a problem than the other I would start there. I truly don't know enough about the breed aside from the basics.

Just as an aside...do you have adequate shelter for the dogs in the backyard? If they are left all day (regardless of time of year) they need to have shade, constant access to water etc. And not just a "shade tree" but a real shelter, insulated from heat especially.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Just as an aside...do you have adequate shelter for the dogs in the backyard? If they are left all day (regardless of time of year) they need to have shade, constant access to water etc. And not just a "shade tree" but a real shelter, insulated from heat especially.
They have 100% access to our garage as well as water all the time and fed appropriatly! There is also a huge tree in the back yard if they choose to stay outside in the shade!
 

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This mix will be WELL over a hundred pounds (likely between 150-200 lbs), they will need DAILY brushing and to be with their humans every moment they are home. They will need training (alot of it) and as has been said here he may well have a very strong gaurdian instinct and working drive.

HE will also need to get alot of socialization, his window for that is closing fast so if you get him you may need to get a trianer that can help you with any fear issues (he should be starting into a fear period soon if he's not there already) as well as any other problems that may come up.
 

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One thing I would be concerned about with a Pyr or Pyr cross elft outside is barking. While they're not shrill or (typically) frustration barkers like some of the herding breeds can be, 99% of the ones I know are barkers when left alone outdoors. It's more of a "Hey! I'm here. Y'all better not come in here and mess with my stuff." type of general alert bark.
 

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I own a female GP, Paige. She is a great dog but can be a challenge too. Honestly I cannot imagine leaving her outside unsupervised, the barking would drive my neighbors insane within 30 minutes. Even when my husband or I are out with her she will bark for reasons unknown to us. It isn't high pitched shrill barking, just persistent. If she doesn't get excersize it is a million times worse.

Aside from the barking GP's are known to be escape artists. An 8 ft fence is nothing for a GP. Our girl hasn't ever attempted it but other GP owners have told us we are quite lucky.

GP's are very independent. Paige knows commands but we really have to stay on top of her training bc she loves to just plain out ignore me. She isn't a dog that seeks affection from people. She will tolerate it but will NEVER lick you or try to get close to you. The only exception with Paige is my husband. She adores him and he is the only person she will work to get pets from.

The shedding, holy cow. When she blows her coat it is ridiculous, I have white tufts of hair just floating through the house. Globs in every corner, under tables, chairs and couches. Try as you might you will NEVER manage to get it all. People who don't like dog hair on their furniture, clothes and counters and every other surface in the house, should not own a GP lol We jokingly call all the hair Paige's contribution to decorating.

Grooming isn't too bad but Paige isn't one of the fluffier GP's. I brush her everyday or every other day. Her feathers will matt pretty easily especially if she has picked up grass burrs or something of the sort.

Hope this helps. I am by no means a GP expert, Paige is the only one I have ever owned figured I could give you a bit of an idea of what to expect from the GP side. Now Newf's, I know next to nothing about lol Goodluck
 

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Pyrs and Newfs don't have a lot in common beyond intelligence and largeness. And fur...lots of fur.

I'd definitely want to spend some time getting to know the pup before making a decision. Pyrs that have not been properly socialized can be thorny. That's true of any breed but much moreso with a breed developed as predator controllers.
 
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