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Hoping for some help from kitty owners. I miss having a cat (little background, I had a cat that I adopted right after high school. He was an awesome cat-very social, very cuddly, would great you at the door. We are military, so he moved with us from WI to TX to AL, to KY, then back to WI. With my husband's second deployment, he went to go live with one of my friends from work while I lived with my in-laws. They have a cat also, and they just didn't get along. When my husband was coming back from Afghanistan, I decided to leave Black with my friend. He is getting older, going blind, and I was afraid of throwing him in our crazy life. He's very happy with my friend). My husband and son are both allergic to cats, but with Black we used Aller-cat (I think that's what it's called) and it worked wonders. However I really want another cat, but I don't want my son and husband to just constantly be sneezing.

So is a hypoallergenic cat the way to go? I'm just not sure how hypoallergenic a cat can be-I don't know much about them. I really want to adopt one also. I'd also prefer an outgoing fun cat. My son is 3, but he loves to cuddle, hes very gentle with animals-but he's also a 3 year old. Thoughts and ideas would be great!!
 

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How are they on an antihistamine like Claritin or Zyrtec? I'm not sure what's allowed/advisable for 3-year-olds though.

Some people aren't allergic to Siberian Forest Cats, because they don't produce the protein that those people are allergic to. There aren't a lot of breeders and they're expensive, and your family members might not be allergic to that protein (maybe fur or something), so make sure you take your husband and kid to the breeder's house (or someone else who owns a Siberian) for long visits before deciding. And some people aren't allergic to the hairless cats (they produce the protein but don't have fur for it to stick in), but of course they have their own grooming issues.

Otherwise, there's some evidence that darker-colored cats produce more allergens than light-colored cats, and males produce more than females. So a light-colored female might work if your guys aren't too allergic. I guess the 3-year-old has always lived with cats? I don't know if I'd risk an unknown reaction in such a young kid but if you already know how he'll react that's OK.

I've heard from a lot of people that the cat's diet and environment really make a big difference in how allergic they are to that cat. Like they switch their cat's food/litter and are suddenly more/less allergic, etc. So a little experimenting can help too.
 

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Thanks!! My husband pretty much takes allergy meds daily because he's allergic to our dogs too, he's just more allergic to cats. Sam has been around cats up until the last 3 months. When my cat went to go live with my friend, he was still around my mother in laws cat. My son also takes allergy meds, but I think his is also outside allergies because we are stationed in the south. When we are home in Wisconsin, he doesn't have as many problems. Black was a black cat (haha I know very creative name, that was his name at the humane society, and we just kept it), so it makes sense that darker cats produce more allergens.

I'd love a bengal, but I'm not familiar with their temperament and if they'd be a good fit with a 3 year old.
 

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Bengals are variable depending on the breeder, their lines, which generation, etc. Some are perfectly tame, just a little more active than normal, and some lines run more toward being wild things. Best to get to know the breeder and how their cats are before committing. I'm not sure how Bengal breeders generally feel about little kids in the home though.

Purebred cats are pretty rare though. Well-bred purebreds even more rare :/. If you do go the purebred route, make sure it's a good breeder and you fully understand the health problems common in the breed, and what the breeding animals should be tested for, because health-wise, it would be better to pick up a scraggly farm kitten than a poorly-bred cat of certain breeds. Some breeds are just not healthy.
 

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I find a lot of people can tolerate their own cats (even if they're allergic to cats) but not others'. I am actually a bit allergic to cats and when I go to shelters or play with cats that I don't see often, I get sneezy and get a stuffy nose... but with my three I don't have a problem despite the tumbleweeds of cat fur we have rolling around the house lol.

I think the best is just to meet a bunch of cats and see which ones your husband and son are not allergic to.
 

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20 /20 did a news section on Bengals that were being sold for thousand(s) of dollars for being Hypoallergenic and it was debunked doing the skin test on them.. all of them had the same as other cats do that can cause people to be sensitive to them.. I guess you take your chances with each individual animal of any breed or mix breed.. but at least don't pay huge money thinking it's 100% sure thing...
 

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If you don't mind their slightly odd look, I've heard that Devon Rex, while not actually hypoallergenic, are the closest to hypoallergenic cats, as they have a very different coat from regular cats. They're very friendly and almost dog like in personality too, but definitely a bit odd looking, lol. they have a very short, soft, wavy or curly coat, and a Siamese type body with great big ears, lol.





http://www.cfa.org/Breeds/BreedsCJ/DevonRex.aspx
 
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