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579074_235507573243488_1000201439_n.jpg I have a year and a half of German Shepard / Lab Mix, named Rally. He's a rescue that I adopted when he was around 5months old. Rally has a lot of behaviors that aren't so lovely ... like jumping, constant jumping; I usually get a head butt too the teeth once or twice a day, he pulls on his leash to the point of pulling me over. When he's in the house he jumps on everything, counters, tables, doors, windows it's literally like he can not calm down.
I went to a trainer but he wanted over $400 to put him into a residential training program. I was wondering if anyone's had similar issues, with rescue dogs or otherwise and how you went about settling them down. He spends most of his day outdoors, running around the yard, before anyone asks if I keep him cooped up all day. I let that dog run until he's worn out enough to want to come in willingly, but even then he's only down for maybe an hour before he's all wound up again!

HELP!
 

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Mental exercise is important, he has to learn self-control in the house. Look up "NILIF" (Nothing In Life Is Free) as one way to work training and structure into his life. Also look up "Silky leash" for leash pulling. Try watching some Kikipup videos on youtube. Teach him to chill out-- basically just toss him little treats whenever he is laying around quietly. When he gets too wild, ignore his antics until he calms down for a moment and then reward the calm.
Teach the command "OFF" for furniture that he shouldn't be on.

Crate training can be a good idea- so that you can have a breather and he can learn to chew a safe toy quietly in his crate instead of demanding more play time.

Also, walks are important, not just playing in the yard. The different sights and smells encountered when walking different places engages their brain and tires them out more than just running in the yard. Different activities like hiking, swimming, meeting people, etc are all good for mental activity along with physical activity.

Basically he's a normal dog that lacks training. Most of the rescues I foster are similar. A basic obedience class (usually about $75-100 for an 8 week session with one class per week) can be a BIG help. It will give you training techniques and things to work on over the course of each week between classes.
 

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What Shell said.

He needs some mental stimulation, and maybe more physical WITH you to increase the bond for engagement and training.

If a dog is exercised and can't learn to settle in the house, they get crated. This is pretty much how I teach dogs to settle, or give myself time to settle when they can't. LETTING him do these behaviors just reinforces them more, so keep him on a lead in the house when he's not in the crate, and keep treats on you. Ask for sits for everything. It's something easy that he should be able to do. Teach a touch and ask him to start doing those, move on to downs, etc. Look up silky leash walking videos on youtube and follow those. I've had great success teaching it to classes of dogs that pull badly.
 

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View attachment 77194 I have a year and a half of German Shepard / Lab Mix, named Rally. He's a rescue that I adopted when he was around 5months old. Rally has a lot of behaviors that aren't so lovely ... like jumping, constant jumping; I usually get a head butt too the teeth once or twice a day, he pulls on his leash to the point of pulling me over. When he's in the house he jumps on everything, counters, tables, doors, windows it's literally like he can not calm down.
I went to a trainer but he wanted over $400 to put him into a residential training program. I was wondering if anyone's had similar issues, with rescue dogs or otherwise and how you went about settling them down. He spends most of his day outdoors, running around the yard, before anyone asks if I keep him cooped up all day. I let that dog run until he's worn out enough to want to come in willingly, but even then he's only down for maybe an hour before he's all wound up again!

HELP!
We spent $3000 on residential training-- worth every penny (dog gets free touch up sessions for Life)... SHe was a big powerful out of control dog(giant schnauzer) and my first that really tested me (we lived in a densely populated area-- SF, in a kid intensive neighborhood- so that expense was a no brainer in contrast to the potential liabilty)....

So that 3 week boot camp, 3 rounds of obedience classes together ( to cement our training relationship) and 2 hour off leash hikes in stimulating environments daily for 3 years took the edge off her-- she started to settle at about age 3.5...
 

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Both of the breeds he's made from (he's super handsome, by the way) were bred to have a job. And, he's frustrated that you're not giving him one.

Work on training. Walking with a loose leash next to you? That's a great job! Sitting and waiting for his dinner? Great job! Once he has walking manners, you could invest in a back pack. A bottle of water on each side will make him feel important and tire him out.

And, mental exercise is sooooo much fun for both of you. You'll be working on the basics now, but people have their dogs Di incredible things! You should look up kikopup for anything training and justjesse to see all that dogs can do. I'm hoping to teach my Shiloh to close a door later this week and my poodle mix is working on "go hide."

Pick up a clicker and start using it. But watch out, you could become a junkie for it like a lot of us here.
 

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I agree with what everyone said. My avatar is my Lab-GSD mix Shep, and we had similar problems. In addition to two 30 min. (off leash) runs every day, I was lucky enough to find a playmate that he could wrestle with for an hour every week. Those activities, in addition to 10 min. of training every day, seemed to drain off most of the destructive energy.

When he's about to jump, try to anticipate it and ask him to Sit beforehand.
 
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