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Hello everyone,
I have a little experience with dogs and all, but can someone recommend a guide on how to care for a Siberian Husky? There have been about 6-7 rescued Huskies where I live and I am going to adopt one. He is about 5 months old and if someone is willing to offer help to me, just some basics about Huskies etc, thanks!
 

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We have some members devoted to the northern breeds, so I'll let them get into the specifics, but the most important part of owning a northern breed is exercise. Exercise, exercise, exercise and then more exercise. Not a 30 minute leisurely stroll once a day, but hours of hard exercise, every day. (Though you do need to be careful of their joints when they're still growing.)
 

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For someone with little experience with dogs I would not recommend it. They are a difficult breed to work with and require a lot of patience, they are considered a breed that needs way more dedication than most. It is not like a lab or golden that you can leave in the yard and just expect them to be ok. They are hyper, shed a lot, loud, and know how to push your buttons. I have a husky and a smooth collie mix and I consider my smooth collie mix to be a million times easier than my husky, she actually listens when I ask her to do something, she doesn't have to be taken on long runs, and she doesn't blow coat. But if you are really deturmand to get a husky these are the things you should know:

Negative
Blow Coat (2x annually)
Exercise Requirement: High
Escape Artists
Can Sing Loudly
Don't Listen
Never Trustworthy Off Leash
Pulls On Leash (Though they can be taught with great difficulty to walk on a loose leash.)
They Are Crafty
High Prey Drive

I will explain. While this may not fit EVERY husky most of these negatives are true of the breed. They do need a lot of exercise, when I take Miko on a 8 mile hike he could easily keep going and we live in a hot climate. I can't stress the exercise enough because if you don't think you can handle an hour long run than I would reconsider now. They will get destructive if they aren't given an outlet like running. One good way to combat their needs is to get a bike and teach them how to run along side you, this way you are going at a speed that both of you can handle. However I do not recommend this until they are fully grown because you don't want to stress their joints. I believe they are fully grown around 1 year to 1 1/2 years.
Sibes also shed like crazy twice a year, I don't mean a little throughout the year, I mean that they literally blow their whole undercoat. Which means that not only do tuffs of fur come out you can brush your husky out and get a mountain of fur from just one sitting. There is a video that a forum member posts about how much a husky sheds.
Huskies can climb and unlatch fences no matter the height. I have heard of huskies jumping over 6-8 food high fencing, they will also dig under it if that is easier. They really will find any way possible to escape if they are not satisfied with their confinement. Once they get out they are likely to run for hours and not look back, they wont even realize they are lost until its dinner time.
They are not trustworthy off leash in most cases because they will ignore your calls to come back if they don't see it being worth it. Again they will keep running until their legs fall off because its what they were bred to do.
Also they are quite loud when it comes to singing, which can really be annoying to neighbors, however they don't bark very often.

Positives
Goofy
Beautiful
Smart (Though not by the standard)
Loving
Great With Kids
Good With Other Dogs (most dogs)
Adventure Loving

They are great dogs don't get me wrong, its just so many people jump into owning a husky because they are pretty or cool. But they don't know the struggles that come along with this unique breed. They are not just another dog, they require a lot of work and love, but once you have figured the breed out they are one of the most fulfilling breeds to work with because they can be so difficult, but you have to be willing to work through all the negative. I love my husky I can't imagine life without him, but that doesn't mean some days I wished I didn't have such a demanding dog. Do a lot of research on the breed and try to spend a lot of time around them to get an idea of what you would be getting yourself into, try to train a husky to see how they learn.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
For someone with little experience with dogs I would not recommend it. They are a difficult breed to work with and require a lot of patience, they are considered a breed that needs way more dedication than most. It is not like a lab or golden that you can leave in the yard and just expect them to be ok. They are hyper, shed a lot, loud, and know how to push your buttons. I have a husky and a smooth collie mix and I consider my smooth collie mix to be a million times easier than my husky, she actually listens when I ask her to do something, she doesn't have to be taken on long runs, and she doesn't blow coat. But if you are really deturmand to get a husky these are the things you should know:

Negative
Blow Coat (2x annually)
Exercise Requirement: High
Escape Artists
Can Sing Loudly
Don't Listen
Never Trustworthy Off Leash
Pulls On Leash (Though they can be taught with great difficulty to walk on a loose leash.)
They Are Crafty
High Prey Drive

I will explain. While this may not fit EVERY husky most of these negatives are true of the breed. They do need a lot of exercise, when I take Miko on a 8 mile hike he could easily keep going and we live in a hot climate. I can't stress the exercise enough because if you don't think you can handle an hour long run than I would reconsider now. They will get destructive if they aren't given an outlet like running. One good way to combat their needs is to get a bike and teach them how to run along side you, this way you are going at a speed that both of you can handle. However I do not recommend this until they are fully grown because you don't want to stress their joints. I believe they are fully grown around 1 year to 1 1/2 years.
Sibes also shed like crazy twice a year, I don't mean a little throughout the year, I mean that they literally blow their whole undercoat. Which means that not only do tuffs of fur come out you can brush your husky out and get a mountain of fur from just one sitting. There is a video that a forum member posts about how much a husky sheds.
Huskies can climb and unlatch fences no matter the height. I have heard of huskies jumping over 6-8 food high fencing, they will also dig under it if that is easier. They really will find any way possible to escape if they are not satisfied with their confinement. Once they get out they are likely to run for hours and not look back, they wont even realize they are lost until its dinner time.
They are not trustworthy off leash in most cases because they will ignore your calls to come back if they don't see it being worth it. Again they will keep running until their legs fall off because its what they were bred to do.
Also they are quite loud when it comes to singing, which can really be annoying to neighbors, however they don't bark very often.

Positives
Goofy
Beautiful
Smart (Though not by the standard)
Loving
Great With Kids
Good With Other Dogs (most dogs)
Adventure Loving

They are great dogs don't get me wrong, its just so many people jump into owning a husky because they are pretty or cool. But they don't know the struggles that come along with this unique breed. They are not just another dog, they require a lot of work and love, but once you have figured the breed out they are one of the most fulfilling breeds to work with because they can be so difficult, but you have to be willing to work through all the negative. I love my husky I can't imagine life without him, but that doesn't mean some days I wished I didn't have such a demanding dog. Do a lot of research on the breed and try to spend a lot of time around them to get an idea of what you would be getting yourself into, try to train a husky to see how they learn.
Fantastic reply, this was so helpful. I have quite a bit of experience, so I'm thinking I can handle it. I'm also very, very patient and very energetic, I can run him for an hour, no problem. If you could give me some links/guides I can get that can help me out, I'd be very appreciative.
 

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Wait, wait, wait. Hang on a second. How does this:
Hello everyone,
I have a little experience with dogs and all
Translate to this:
I have quite a bit of experience
??????

I am always all for someone adopting a Siberian to save his/her life. I encourage it. However, I am very wary of someone who jumps headlong into it and says "I have little experience with dogs" when a Siberian is far from a dog for a first, second, third or even a fourth time dog owner (implying someone with lots of experience) and in the next reply says "I have quite a bit of experience I'm ready!". There should ALWAYS be some kind of doubt that "maybe I can't handle this" when looking at ANY breed of dog (not just Siberians).

A fair warning: You think now that you are very patient - a husky will try EVERY single ounce of your patience and then PUSH YOU right over the edge. You say your energetic? A Siberian Husky was bred to pull sleds for upwards of 75 MILES A DAY - something to think about. The hour run was a MINIMUM that Active Dog suggested. My Siberian goes for five and a half mile walks when the weather isn't crappy and she gets at least 3 mile RUNS on a bike where she is PULLING me the entire way regularly. Another Siberian owner on here does 5 miles with one of her girls three times a week.

This is what a NOT BORED husky who gets PLENTY of exercise can do:

Now there are 5 other areas of my house that are like that where she chewed the wall :) That was done after her 5 mile walk the other day.


This is also something you'll put up with - screaming/howling (active dog put it incredibly nicely by saying singing lol)
That's some of the noises (and this is very mild for her)

More to come!
 

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Shedding!
I can't find the original video I like posting!
Anyway. that will last about roughly a month (sometimes a week less sometimes more) and you'll deal with it typically TWICE a year.
 

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If you don't mind me asking. Why do you want a husky? What are your motivations to getting this breed? I don't just mean to have a dog or have a companion, I mean what do you think it is about huskies that would fit well with you and your life.

Here is a link on urban mushing: http://www.urbanmushing.com/scooteringandsleddinggear.htm

AKC: http://www.akc.org/breeds/siberian_husky/

General Info: http://www.dogster.com/dog-breeds/Siberian_Husky

I would highly suggest reading this book as a general guide to training dogs in general : http://www.patriciamcconnell.com/product/the-other-end-of-the-leash-understanding-and-communicating-with-your-dog

A popular sport; urban mushing is being taken up by many husky owners: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M0csd3XMJBw

Lol yes Niraya is right I was being mild when I said singing.....it can be quite....um....obnoxious....to say the least. Also yes and hour is minimum! Like I said I take my guy on a 8+ mile hike on every Saturday (he also wears a backpack) and he is still more than happy to go for longer. This Saturday I am hoping to hit a 10 mile hike and he will probably still be fine to continue.

Here is a vid of Miko "singing" or more accurately throwing a tantrum....
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E8ZybGaCaOs&context=C3bcf5ddADOEgsToPDskIWw2DZlEB_tCCMVxMZhzQD
 

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Now the really great things about a husky!
For me - I love the talking. I encourage my girl to do it all of the time - however that doesn't mean it's for everyone! My parents also really enjoy the noises she makes (for the most part - sometimes she goes a little overboard) - I'm lucky. As most people will not like the screaming (and they do scream bloody murder) or even the howling. They are relatively quiet in the sense that they don't bark and are not alert barkers.



^^You can see in this picture where she's chewed/chewing up my rug. Again this is a very active and exercised Siberian X_X
***also, even in the house she's on a leash*** this is because we have two small dogs that she cannot be left unsupervised with. Her prey drive is INTENSE and I don't doubt that if she ever actually was given the chance she would kill/seriously injure my mothers dogs (They are 4 and 6 pound Maltese - she's 50 pounds)


My girl is a lover. she's always with me (or on me chewing things) and doing things I'm doing. These are pictures of a typical day for me basically. (***Not every husky is like this as most are very independent and often do their own thing/don't expect your husky to be attached at your hip***). Though when she wants to do her own thing she will. Siberian's are VERY "pack oriented" meaning they LOVE to be involved in EVERYTHING that you're doing (or not doing). They do pretty terribly if left to their own devices or with little to know interaction with their people.

They're VERY stubborn. If they don't want to do something they will NOT do it. With that being said - because of their high intelligence and stubbornness it makes them a pretty big challenge to train as they are not a biddable breed of dog.

It's great to want to save an animal - it's also very important to realize that they might not be the breed for you (even though you REALLY want one). remember - you don't do a service to an animal by saving it and then realizing that you got in WAY over your head and have to take it back to the shelter =/.
 

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You need HIGH fencing. They can jump/climb 6 foot fences/walls.
They can be very vocal...if you live in an apartment/duplex/townhome, noise may be an issue
Can have high prey drive. If you have small pets, you need to supervise.

Without a lot of exercise, can be noisy and destructive.
Possible that they may never be safe off leash, as they like to RUN.
 

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I found another post of yours where you seemed to decide on an italian grey hound....also your requirments don't seem to fit the husky lifestyle. I would suggest looking at non-arctic breeds.

I can't seem to pick a dog...since my requirements are picky haha!

key :
* priority 1 = I need this
** priority 2 = I can sacrifice this, but would rather not
*** priority 3 = I'm just being picky

I don't want a dog too huge like a great dane *
can live in an apartment , if needed I would take for walks but would prefer I would not NEED to give extreme exercise (1 hour and a half + ) *
prefer not to drool **
doesn't bark too much **
not have TOO much fur (like a shetland sheepdog...even though they are beautiful)***
 

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Getting a husky or northern breed takes a lot of planning. Make sure you are in it for the long haul. I don't like owners that realize they are more work than you thought and get rid of them. They were bred to pull sleds, they are busy...


This is from my husky rescuer group


Below is a handout that WinterPaws Arctic Breed Rescue gives to all potential adopters of Alaskan Malamutes and Siberian Huskies. It is also a page on our website. We invite you to copy and paste this information to give to folks who might ask you questions and who express interest in adopting one of these breeds. We simply ask that you copy it in its entirety and do not alter the info.



Are You Ready for a Malamute/Husky?



While there are definite differences in the Alaskan Malamute and Siberian Husky, both exhibit many of the same personality and temperament characteristics. These dogs aren’t for everyone. Please just be honest with yourself before taking on the commitment to being owned by a Mal or Sibe for the next dozen years or so.



If you want a dog that:



May jump up and/or paw at you (we call it the “Mally love pat”)
Countersurfs at will
May chew on the furniture when bored
Begs for food
Keeps itself clean like a cat
Needs daily exercise – even when it’s 10 degrees out.
Mouths on you and your clothes, slippers, shoes
Is smarter than most people
Regularly has a case of the “Zoomies”
Chews on shoes, clothing, cameras, credit cards, electrical cords, cables, socks
Digs – A LOT! NASA will be able to train astronauts on your lawn.
Chases (and catches) cats, squirrels, possums, birds, rabbits, etc.
Howls, woos, whimpers, talks and makes other grumbling Malamute/Husky noises
Lies around the house in your way
Follows you around like a shadow and wants to be with you always
Tries to dig under or go over/through your fence
Knocks your feet out from under you (or possibly your child’s!)
Is strong-willed and stubborn
Prefers a canine companion of comparable size (Mals need opposite gender)
Sheds year-round and blows its undercoat 1-2 times per year
Acts like a goofy clown and makes you laugh (expect surprises)
Loves people, all people, and may even invite the bad guy in.
May have genetic physical ailments later in life like cataracts or hip dysplasia



Then a Malamute/Husky is right for you!



But if you want a dog that:

Listens and obeys your every command, especially “come”
Doesn’t re-landscape your yard
Will be protective and threatening to strangers
Eats and drinks out of the bowls cleanly
Can be let off leash and won’t run away
Will not howl out of loneliness
Does not shed profusely
Is quiet
Gets along with your cat or other small pet without playing too rough
Doesn’t find joy in digging/rolling/splashing in the mud
Wants to be kept in the backyard away from people like a yard ornament

Then a Malamute/Husky is NOT right for you!



Please ask yourself…



Am I Willing to:

Devote the hours, energy and patience necessary to train this dog and constantly reinforce this training?
Spend, at least, one hour per day exercising this dog?
Comb and brush this dog several times each week?
Live with and clean up after, all the shedding that will occur?
Take full responsibility for a thinking, living creature that depends solely on me?
Spend time everyday playing with this dog?
Socialize this dog so that it will be a good citizen in his neighborhood and in public?
Accept the fact that my Malamute/Siberian will probably not be a good watchdog?
Accept that my Malamute may suddenly not get along with other dogs?
Accept that my Siberian may quickly turn into Houdini and make necessary home improvements?

Am I Able to:

Provide a clean, healthy living environment for the dog?
Keep the dog in a cool climate/air conditioned home during warm months?
Physically handle a very large, strong, energetic dog?
Spend the money necessary for proper veterinary care and premium food?
Bathe and de-shed the dog as needed or pay a groomer to do the job?
Provide activities for this working breed so it can use its mind?
Make this commitment for the next dozen or more years?

If you are honest with yourself and can answer a resounding “Yes” to these questions, then surely a Malamute or Siberian will give you years of joy and quite an adventure. There are amazing rewards to having a Mal or Sibe as a companion, but they are not like other breeds and DO require hard work, patience and consistency. Please do your homework FIRST, and make sure this breed is right for you and your family!



Final Words to Live by:

(1) Never punish an animal for being who it was born to be.

(2) Everything tastes better with dog hair in it.

(3) Vigilance. Vigilance.

(4) I was planning on buying new [shoes, pants, toys – take your pick] anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Sorry everyone, I'm not that clear on this thread and there has been some confusion.

I will post again tomorrow morning and go into details about why I want to adopt him, why I'm sure I can handle him, my current situation, and clarify a little more about everything.

I love the care that this forum displays and I'd like to apologize for my previous posts as I did not put too much thought and time into them and expected people to understand what I meant to say.

I will put in a lot more effort starting tomorrow! :D
 

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Active Dog had a great idea looking through your passed thread - so I did also!
And that post by MalLove is absolutely fantastic! Thank you for posting :)

Reading your other thread; you want NOTHING to do with a Siberian Husky.

I'll be looking forward to reading your post tomorrow - but based on the things you said in your other thread 45 minutes up to an hour and a half is the minimum amount of exercise you can get away with for a Husky. That will also lead to a destructive dog if you skip a day. Again, think of what my exercised girl is capable of doing to my home.

You don't want an over smart dog - one that will be stubborn. That is EXACTLY what you'll have with a Siberian an overly smart and stubborn dog.

You said you "DEF. want a Velcro dog" which a Siberian is far from.

You seem to have a pretty relaxed version of how a day with your dog would go - on that I'd definitely stay far away from a young or even a young adult husky. Siberian's are a breed that will remain a "puppy" well into their life - we're talking 5-6-7 years old or more! If you REALLY want a Siberian Husky - I'd suggest looking at rescuing an olderish dog and not a puppy as the demand for exercise will not be as great and they might be more prone to just "hop on the couch and watch TV" with you.

Here's a typical day for me and my husky - I've had her since 10 weeks old:
She wakes me up to go out with a bunch of howling.
we go out and potty then she gets breakfast (Siberian's don't eat as much as a dog of another breed but equal size because of how they were bred)
we play probably anywhere from 15 minutes to an hour and a half of fetch, chase, play, hide and seek around the house every day.
If the weather is nice we'll go for a couple mile walk.
She gets SEVERAL training periods throughout the day.
Then I get some down time (if I'm lucky)
In the evening she'll get another walk (again if the weather is decent - I even walk her in the snow and if it is drizzling I'll walk her also)
She'll get dinner
She'll get another half hour give or take of playing around the house.
She'll get her evening zoomies out which lasts about 10 minutes.

We'll go to bed.

Randomly at any given time - usually between 1 and 4am she'll decide it's play time which consists of a TON of barking/howling/screaming and biting.
 

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Active Dog had a great idea looking through your passed thread - so I did also!
And that post by MalLove is absolutely fantastic! Thank you for posting :)

Reading your other thread; you want NOTHING to do with a Siberian Husky.

I'll be looking forward to reading your post tomorrow - but based on the things you said in your other thread 45 minutes up to an hour and a half is the minimum amount of exercise you can get away with for a Husky. That will also lead to a destructive dog if you skip a day. Again, think of what my exercised girl is capable of doing to my home.

You don't want an over smart dog - one that will be stubborn. That is EXACTLY what you'll have with a Siberian an overly smart and stubborn dog.

You said you "DEF. want a Velcro dog" which a Siberian is far from.

You seem to have a pretty relaxed version of how a day with your dog would go - on that I'd definitely stay far away from a young or even a young adult husky. Siberian's are a breed that will remain a "puppy" well into their life - we're talking 5-6-7 years old or more! If you REALLY want a Siberian Husky - I'd suggest looking at rescuing an olderish dog and not a puppy as the demand for exercise will not be as great and they might be more prone to just "hop on the couch and watch TV" with you.

Here's a typical day for me and my husky - I've had her since 10 weeks old:
She wakes me up to go out with a bunch of howling.
we go out and potty then she gets breakfast (Siberian's don't eat as much as a dog of another breed but equal size because of how they were bred)
we play probably anywhere from 15 minutes to an hour and a half of fetch, chase, play, hide and seek around the house every day.
If the weather is nice we'll go for a couple mile walk.
She gets SEVERAL training periods throughout the day.
Then I get some down time (if I'm lucky)
In the evening she'll get another walk (again if the weather is decent - I even walk her in the snow and if it is drizzling I'll walk her also)
She'll get dinner
She'll get another half hour give or take of playing around the house.
She'll get her evening zoomies out which lasts about 10 minutes.

We'll go to bed.

Randomly at any given time - usually between 1 and 4am she'll decide it's play time which consists of a TON of barking/howling/screaming and biting.


Oh wow!! bella is a wild one! Malamutes and huskies tend to be the same and a lot of aspects, Maggie is a little more wild than she used to be, I have the worlds calmest puppy. I started the training at 8 weeks with the basic commands. She gets these random parts of energy and take off circles around the dog yard. I try to walk her and mush her everyday, sometime to the dog park. I own an pet sitting/walking/training for huskies and other breeds. I always bring Maggie with me to vendor events and say hey I can get your husky or mal this good. People are amazed at year and half she acts like a 6 year old pup. I worked hard at this!! It takes a lot of time or energy to train them as good as some of us had. It took me a while to get the mushing commands down.
 

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She was a GODSEND when she was a puppy, MalLove :p. She was actually pretty biddable - she didn't destroy things (much/often). She was housetrained by 5 months old - learned all of her basic commands efficiently within days. She LOVED just sleeping and she was actually incredibly quiet until about 7-8 months old.

And then she turned a year old (it's like she's a late bloomer with her terrible twos)! Now her stubbornness is REALLY showing. She gives me this look ALL of the time like "Really? I don't want to." I used to be able to get away with skipping about 3 days max without giving her a walk or bike ride but now it's getting really hard to (as evidence of my wall picture). Especially since winter hit - I just don't want to go out in 15-20 degree weather for a two hour walk or bike ride. She gets to go to the dog park sometimes (like when it snows I'll take her because she can be off leash) but it's only been mud up here this winter lots of rain and only a couple snow storms. =/


^ This showcases her crazy pretty well. I wake up to this a lot of times. She digs my blankets off of me and balls them up around/over/under herself and then screams her head off to play at 3 in the morning. Thankfully I have very heavy sleeping (understanding) parents!
 

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I can't seem to pick a dog...since my requirements are picky haha!

key :
* priority 1 = I need this
** priority 2 = I can sacrifice this, but would rather not
*** priority 3 = I'm just being picky

I don't want a dog too huge like a great dane *
can live in an apartment , if needed I would take for walks but would prefer I would not NEED to give extreme exercise (1 hour and a half + ) *
prefer not to drool **
doesn't bark too much **
not have TOO much fur (like a shetland sheepdog...even though they are beautiful)***
Yeah, I'd say you definitely don't want a Siberian Husky...or any Northern breed for that matter.

I really can't add much to what everyone has said already.

Sure, saving the dog would be great but if you get him home and figure out you can't handle him then he's going to end up going back to where he came from. It would be better for you and the husky if you got a dog that fit your lifestyle so you can have a forever four legged friend. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Ok everyone! I'm back home.

Now, I will go into a lot of detail so excuse me if this post is a little long.

Last year, I had interest in getting another dog. I used to own a Golden Retriever. I did not want to get a dog whom I would have gotten rid of in a few weeks. So I did my research, but I found out that I was moving in but a few months. I volunteered at a

veterinarian's clinic in the meantime. The months went by and I moved to the country I'm at right now (The UAE) and I'm very thankful that my house nearly doubled in size with less fragile furniture and lot's of running space, although it is an apartment (If you

live in the UAE you'd know there is no houses only apartments). So, I volunteered in the only shelter in the emirate where I'm at but it turns out that the country is very ignorant when it comes towards dogs. (Not the people, the government.)

This is the list of dogs banned to be brought into the country :

American Staffordshire Terrier
American Pit Bull Terrier
American Bull Dog
Bull Terrier
Old English Bull Dog
Staffordshire Bull Terrier
Tosa
Husky
Rottweiler
Doberman
Shar Pei
Perro de presa mallorquin/Bull Dog
Neapolitan
Argentinean Mastiff
Miniature Bull Terrier
Canary dog fila brasilerio/ Brazilian Mastiff

So the government unofficially has also banned the sale of them except a few in a specific emirate in a petshop. As such, the only shelter in the country, with very little to no power could not put them up for adoption without facing the wrath of the

government. They could not keep all 7, so I took 4 for foster care and I referred potential owners to the shelter who would interview them and see if they are fit. So far it does not look like many of them will get adopted, only 2 have gone so far and one is

kept with the local vet as he loved him. I have grown very, very fond of a specific one between them. Now while I know how to handle him, I'd like to know his future needs so I can be sure to give him the best lifestyle he can possibly get. As such, this is

what I can provide him:

An hour+ of exercise every day. (My lifestyle has gotten way more active after time)

Another two hours dedicated to him. (Obedience training + grooming)

A family that would love to care for him.

I have enough money to care for him, the budget is no problem for me at the moment.



I would most likely adopt this dog in 2 weeks if no other potential owners adopts him in this time, so I'd like to get as much of a read on him and his kind as I can.

Thanks everyone, sorry for the long read and the confusion!
 

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It sounds like you have made up your mind, which is fine if you are willing to put the work in.

1. Start training early. Sit, stay, recall, etc. Do it now.

2. Don't let him off leash in an unenclosed area. Huskies are runners. Get a long line if you want to give him the ability to wander a little more. Maybe, just maybe, if you worked him long enough and got a really really solid recall you might be able to accomplish this but it most likely won't be until he is 5-8 years old and a little more settled down. In fact, I would put him in a martingale collar if you can find one. It doesn't allow dogs to slip their collars so there is less chance of them escaping.

3. Crate train him.

4. Invest in Kongs (stuff them and freeze them and give them to him in his crate on days you need him to be quiet or you need a quick break)

5. Don't trust all fences. Even if he is in an enclosed area, keep an eye on him. Make sure he doesn't learn that fences can be dug under/jumped over

Some website resources:
Husky Ownership: http://www.huskycamp.com/manual.htm
Siberian Husky Club of America: http://www.shca.org/shcahp2a.htm
Info from Siberian Rescue: http://www.siberianrescue.com/seneca.htm

Otherwise, a Husky is just like any other dog really. Some things to consider:

- Invest in a dog backpack (a good one) and get him used to that early on. On walks you can put it on him and get him a little more worn out and he can carry your stuff.

- Invest in a harness (x back harness) and get him used to pulling things (very light things a first to get him used to the feeling behind him). Eventually as he gets older you can have him pull you while you are on a bike/roller blades/scooter. Allowing him to run and pull you tires dogs out fast.

- Keep in mind he may eat a little less than say a Golden Retriever or some other breed. Siberian Huskies were bred to be very efficient eaters so they (very general they) tend to eat a little less than other breeds in order to maintain weight. This is something to be aware of more as an adult though.
 

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Some things I WASN'T prepared for that I found out with mine, and now from a few others. I did a lot of research myself before getting Leo.

separation anxiety. - some huskies don't crate train well. I can't leave my dog for 2 minutes in a kennel without him destroying it and pooping and peeing all over. it is quite sad. we ended up having to get a house with an attached sun room converted dog kennel. They are super attached loving dogs but that also brings on the separation anxiety. so if your gone a lot at work this is something to consider.

potty training - GOOD LORD. I am not sure if it is with everyone else here that owns a husky, Leo quite frankly was the most difficult dog to potty train. If he didn't want to do it he just wouldn't do it. I thought i was prepared for this being I own a Basset hound which is suppose to be one of the most stubborn dogs. hopefully being that the one is 5 months old maybe he was started already. ( leo was 2yrs before he stopped having "Accidents", and i was VERY persistent with him)

Clingy - be prepared for this most husky lovers enjoy their dogs being affectionate, but it can become overwhelming.

Jealous - Huskies can be extremely jealous.

Barking - or lack of. they will not usually bark when people come over or to alert you. they can alert you by body language but if your sleeping its something to think about.

SMART- I once woke up from bed, and Leo had my box fan in his mouth by the handle and I watched him pull and turn it to his spot he chose to sleep that day and then went to bed in front of it. One of Leos fav. games is for me to hide the toy. and at the time he was in to this tiny piece of rubber he pulled off another toy. I did that fake out throw a few times ( huskies never fall for that ) and finally I threw it. He also knows how to throw items with great accuracy. anyhow he "threw" it back to me and I looked and looked and looked. and couldn't find it. He got my attention by tapping me with his paw and he proceeded to drop it on my lap. He had imitated my "fake throw" and I fell for it! These are fun stories but their brains can get them into trouble.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=anDvU530g2o
If you followed the story to this dog. She escaped her yard when her owners were at work actually walked at least a mile + to this specific store that she has only ever driven too and got her specific bone. and then walked home and got back into the yard and the owners found out later by watching the news what she had done.
this is extreme but they are so smart they can get into trouble.
 
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