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i've always admired the beauty of these dogs and ive always wanted to own one. Now that i'm getting more serious about a second dog, i'd like some opinions on this breed. Do they get along with other dogs? I'd be interested to know what husky owners have to say about this breed.
 

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One thing i have to say is that huskies require a lot of ecxersize and mental stimulation. They are bred to be able to run miles in thick snow so they need a lot of running time every day.
 

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i actually own 2 along with my akita. i have 2 male sibes and 1 female akita.

they can drive you crazy with the amount of energy you have, but each one is different. my koozie is more lazy and laid back. a good walk a day and hes fine. keno is off the wall full of energy no matter what kind of activity he has done.

they also arent the best off lead dogs. neither of mine can be let off lead, they would be long gone. they would much rather run then anything else.

also, they can be stubborn, but very smart if you give them a reason to do what you want.

and if you dont give them mental stimulation, be prepared for your house to be a chew toy. walls, furniture, carpet, everything.

and if not socialized, they can be timid and fearful and that can lead to fear biting/aggression.

they are also known for having sensitive stomaches, so that could be an issue.

and not really having to do with their personalities, but they are on the blacklist for many insurance companies.

that covers a few things!
 

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I have a husky and a terrier mix. They practically grew up together and they tend to get along. It seems as though the terrier is irritated by our husky and tends to avoid the husky who is all too eager to play.

Now, what I find most interesting is our husky's interaction with other dogs. He tends to be more aloof with most other breeds and tends to avoid them. Sometimes when he does want to meet other dogs, it seems as though he's misunderstood. However, if it is another husky.... instant friendship! His eyes zero in, tail wags, and huge smile appear on his face.

He is very eager to please for praises and can be the most stubborn when he doesn't agree. He's very food sensitive and has some separation anxiety which has diminished considerably. He also needs alot of mental and physical stimulation or he will get these 'zoomies' around the house.

A lot of other husky owners will say huskies are friendly, however, mine tends to be more aloof with strangers and will not allow others to touch him unless another family member is around and we give him a nod. He is a lot of work.... but he's worth it.
 

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i do agree with them being aloof.
koozie will not approach anyone but us. even people that he knows and has known since we got him. he has to be the one to make the first move towards you, otherwise he will just keep his distance. and it still takes him a while to warm up to you.
and with the other husky thing is so true. we have new neighbors and they happen to have a husky about 6 months younger than him and it was like woo woo heave there, but other dogs, he is usually just gives one sniff and is on his way.
and seperation anxiety is common in the breed, so thats something to keep in mind. that goes with what i said about them turning your house into a chew toy. and you have to watch, i know of several sneaky huskies that have ate something and required surgry.
and the zoomies, be prepared for your house being a race track. mine will race around the house bounce off the couch and loveseats and keep going.

now keno, hes not the typical husky. he loves everyone and thinks everyone should love him. but i call him the exception. so i dont expect any other huskies i get to be anything like keno.
 

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One of my friends has 12 Siberian Huskys another friend has 8 Siberian Huskys and yet another friend has 9 Siberian Huskys and 2 Alaskan Huskys. All of these dogs are sled dogs. ALL of these dogs are extremely noisy. They will take off if let off leash, but they take to obedience training alright (maybe a little stubborn at times) The females are almost all great with other dogs, while most of the males have dominance problems with other intact males.

I would personally never get a Husky, because all of my friends have told my that huskys are not a very versatile dog, meaning, they have one thing that they love to do and they wont do anything else (however they excel at that one thing).

They SHED horribly twice a year. YOu will be able to make another dog with the amount of hair they shed. and it comes out in huge clumps too.
 

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I've got a 2 year old Husky named Nico. She can be both brilliant and very frustrating at times. She reads me very well and is honestly one of the smartest dogs I've ever owned. She picks up on things very quickly(training etc.). When I'm high energy she's high energy. When I'm relaxing on the couch she responds accordingly. I've never had any problems with her chewing or destroying anything that wasn't given to her as a toy... I think im pretty lucky in those regards. She's a sweetheart and very gentle towards other dogs and people but skiddish around people shes not familiar with. The one problem that I've had and princesstiffany already touched on it...She can't be let off the leash.Ever. She would much rather explore than come back to me(I have to leave the front door open and wait for her to come back when she feels like it). She's also very territorial but not really in an aggressive way...she just likes to let the other dogs in the house know what belongs to her and what room is hers.

I don't know how a Husky would fit into your lifestyle but I love mine and wouldn't trade her for any breed out there.
 

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I don't think Huskies get on or don't get on with other dogs any more or less than any other breed. If they have good socialisation it shouldn't be a problem.
Our husky was the most amazing character, She's been gone a couple of years now but everyday the memory of her makes me smile, or laugh at some of her clownishness!
She also had the most expressive face I've ever seen on a dog - when she had the ump about something, she would actually furrow her brow and frown, alternatively, when she was pleased, she had the biggest smile I've ever seen!!

Below is the best description I've ever read of huskies in general, though of course each and every one is an individual...

"The Siberian makes a fine family pet as long as the owner is patient, has the time to devote to training and exercise, and can deal with a dog that has a mind of its own. Although they don't bark much, Siberians are vocal. They'll sing along with sirens and scream as if being killed if forced to do something they don't want to do. All-breed obedience classes can be a treat if a Sibe is present: a simple "down" command can bring howls of protest even under the most gentle guidance, and a mild correction for nipping can elicit torturous shrieks. This is not the breed for a first-time dog owner who is shy or easily embarrassed in public.

Although they bond easily and tightly to their human families, most northern dogs are not slavish in their affections. Few are successful in obedience competition, particularly at the higher levels, because they are easily bored with repetition and lack precision in their work. They are happy to obey, but always on their own terms. Rather than gaze lovingly into the master's eyes, the Siberian will most likely be content to heel approximately in place, to sit almost straight, to come when called unless there's something else more interesting nearby. It takes a truly dedicated owner to achieve high scores and advanced titles.

Along with destructiveness, the Siberian's bad habits include a penchant for wandering, often preceded by the digging of a hole under the fence, and food-stealing. Digging is natural with this dog; his forbears dug holes in the snow as nests, and the instinct remains strong. His innate need for exercise and his inherent curiosity often lead him astray. So, a strong fence is necessary to keep him home preferably a fence that has been sunk a foot or two into the ground
."
 

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Buzby touched on a few good points... Husky's are VERY expressive. Maybe not quite as much as greyhounds that I've owned in the past but still an expressive dog. Nico can smile and frown with the best of them. Also the quote by Buzby was DEAD ON. Thats probably the best description of a Husky you're going to find.
 

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memory of her makes me smile, or laugh at some of her clownishness!
She also had the most expressive face I've ever seen on a dog - when she had the ump about something, she would actually furrow her brow and frown, alternatively, when she was pleased, she had the biggest smile I've ever seen!!
This is why I love my husky soooooo much! He makes me laugh everyday. He's also a prankster who loves squeeaking his wubba behind my unsuspecting son or try a variety of ways to make the squeaky toy squeeeeeek by pouncing and releasing it differently.

They'll sing along with sirens and scream as if being killed if forced to do something they don't want to do. All-breed obedience classes can be a treat if a Sibe is present: a simple "down" command can bring howls of protest even under the most gentle guidance
Yep! Ilya howls as if he has been hit by a truck for a vacination shot and then carry on all the way to the car. Forget getting his glands expressed or his toenails clipped by a stranger... sigh.... I kinda get the feeling he isn't appreciated much at the vet's office because of the drama.

I don't know if the husky preference is a husky thing.... but I know with mine, I have to put him in a down or a sit before meeting other dogs other than a husky. It just seems his friendliness gets misinterpreted and there is more tension between other breeds while he immediatly goes into play with other huskies and tends to make a beeline towrds them whenever they are in the vicinity.

Between my terrier and husky, the husky requires more training, acceptance, and patience.
 

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I adopted my Husky in September of 2008 - and I can't imagine life without him! He is such a great dog!

I've had lots of dogs throughout my life....a Boxer, Cocker Spaniel, Yorkshire Terrier, German Shepard, Bichon Frise & a Pit Bull - I loved all of them & miss them dearly.

My Husky is loving, funny, friendly and obedient. He is my companion - and yes...he sheds, he loves to run, he loves his walks, he can't be left off leash, and sometimes he has a little sensitive stomach.....but I'm there for him, just like when he comes over to me when I'm feeling down & looks at me with those big blue eyes & gives me his paw.

A Husky is a special dog....don't be afraid of owning one -- love them & they will love you right back -- (just keep them close by;))

Good Luck & post a pic when you get your little angel.:)
 
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