Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey all,
This is my first post here besides in the introductions thread and I look forward to getting to know all of you. My intention for joining this forum, other than to connect with other dog lovers, was to ask for help in conquering the mystery of my best friend's genetics. I don't know for sure if he's part husky, but that's what I'm assuming. I just call him a Husky mix, but I'm thinking there might be a more challenging breed involved. Feel free to throw out your guesses. Here's some info about my handsome little devil.

He's four years old and weighs about 65lbs. He has very long legs, big paws with slight webbing, and a raccoon-looking tail as pictured below. When I got him he was all black, then he kind of morphed over the first year or so.

He's a real character and was a complete monster growing up even with proper socialization and training. If I didn't love him so much from the get I would have gotten rid of him. Here's some of the challenges I experienced with him:

1. resource guarding - food and socks mostly - he will growl, hiss, emit a really high-pitched bark, etc.; he will let me take whatever he has but anyone else has to trade

2. destructiveness - I'm talking chewing holes in my drywall, destroying furniture, eating wood molding, and pulling an electrical socket out through his cage while I was at work(moved his cage after that one)

3. stealing socks off your feet and burying them with invisible dirt

4. fear of normal things(vacuums, thunder, fireworks) and strange things(guns-my dad got a gun and even though he'd never seen one he knew to be afraid of it; statues, gas pumps, a bag of tortilla chips, anything new)

5. extremely uneasy around strangers; it takes him a long time to warm up to strangers, but he remembers everyone from his first six months with me and will be friendly with them

6. leash aggressive, especially when on a short lead; I will not let anyone pet him when he is on a lead

7. extremely high prey drive; on walks he will pounce on random bushes and pull out snakes, mice, birds, you name it; I will not allow children around him

8. great with other dogs off leash

Despite all of those challenges, though, Hunter and I have found a way to coexist peacefully with the rest of the world. It took four years, but I have managed to train him to be semi-polite in public(just took him to his first outdoor concert), to go on runs with me, and to backpack with me and my partner in the mountains without attacking every animal that moves.

If you have any similar husky stories, I'd be overjoyed to discuss their psychotic antics, and if you have any guesses about what Hunter might be mixed with, I'd appreciate the contribution. I read all about training huskies, but the training methods that experts recommend didn't help his certain problematic tendencies.

Sara and Hunter

20046584_10155772689120942_5085306724295608976_n.jpg 19961666_10155772689255942_6065590691399098426_n.jpg huntasapup.jpg 1001.jpg 20032026_10155772689040942_7787348057231674530_n.jpg IMG_0346.jpg 1070.jpg 19989525_10155772688720942_3846954586727189163_n.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
627 Posts
Perhaps some German Shepard; his back has that marking and his ears are pointed on the ends. As a kid we always had German Shepards and one of them was fierce about chasing and eating chickens; the neighbors at that time were not happy!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Yeah, I've considered that before. That's a great guess. I guess I just kind of automatically ruled it out because of his posture and the way he moves(added a pic for reference-he's always hanging his head and I feel like GSDs always look so proud), but his black back is definitely spot-on GSD.
And wow, I can imagine the neighbors weren't too happy with that! Poor puppy didn't even know he did anything wrong.
IMG_0347.jpg
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
627 Posts
Well in looking at the new pictures; maybe Belgian Malinois; they have a more intense look than a GSD and pointer ears, he has that "hunter" look--good name choice !!. Especially the puppy picture very close to a Belgian puppy look. Of course, not that there are too many around anymore; a hybrid wolf dog mixed in. What ever he is he is beautiful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
627 Posts
Oh, the GSD with the chicken issues, my parents gave him to a rancher with lots of room for him to run and cattle, NO CHICKENS, and he was very happy, he didn't mess with the cattle!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Aww, thank you! He's my little pretty boy(I also have a Pyrenees mix that looks like his dorky younger brother). I'm just glad he finally calmed down a little.

I just looked up the Belgian Malinois and they're beautiful! They have a similar temperament to GSD's right? I think I'll gear toward that as far as training goes. He seems to always need a job. People have suggested DNA testing for wolf content before(vet, neighbors, strangers), but as far as I know there isn't a reliable test and I have no idea who his parents were, so I'm just assuming he's a VERY difficult dog.

I'm glad your childhood GSD found a home. I'd say he met his match with the cattle. :) Thanks for the input. BTW, your little guy/girl is a cutie.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
627 Posts
Yes they are similar to the GSD. I knew someone that had one and it was a very intense dog; extremely smart and focused, I think better than a GSD. Sounds good to go the Belgian way on training. Thanks on my Molly, she is Lolli Pop's Molly Bear; named after her mom Lolli Pop and her dad Brown Bear; she is a red/white Boston Terrier but looks black in the pictures; really a nice smooth chocolate color. But Boston's are very difficult dogs too, little size fools you; very smart; she knew the dog door at 10weeks, sit, shake, hi-five but refuses to do lie down. They also chew everything; I get her dog toys for extreme chewers, she has teeth like a pit bull in a small body; guess that comes from the Bull Dog in their original history. Quite a change from my prior Schnauzers for many years. Here are the prior Schnauzers; the two in the front of the picture were the last ones I had; they were both 10yrs old when they passed last year. The two in the back were Fosters and found their forever homes.

IMG00057-20110924-0826-1.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,485 Posts
I'd go with Sibe X GSD, as well.

A dog holding it's head up while stacked doesn't necessarily move with its head held that high. My GSD usually carried her head at or slightly above level when she moves.

Also, there are different "types" of GSD, ranging from the more extreme American and West German show line dogs to the more moderate working lines, to the *ahem* "old-fashioned" type that never really existed, to pet lines that are a mish-mash of all and/or nothing of the previous.

Malinois tend to be quite high drive and high energy, and a lot of them border on frantic and neurotic. Depending on the lines, GSD can range from similar to Malinois to low drive couch potato.

As for testing him for wolf content.... eh, I'd make sure that I checked the laws concerning wolf hybrids in my area before I did that. Some locals are quite draconian about things like containment, and posting your property. Also, some rabies vaccines are not approved for wolves and wolf hybrids.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Molly is a perfect name- she is adorable. As a public servant(EMS/Fire) I no longer underestimate small-but-mighty dogs. She looks fast, too. And your Schnauzers were beautiful, too. Are they as smart as I've heard? That's all my mom had growing up and she always talked about how intelligent they were.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
LeoRose:
That's a good point about GSDs. Out of curiosity, did you ever show yours?
"Bordering on frantic and neurotic" pretty much sums him up when he knows what I want him to do(as long as he's not resource guarding), like when I tell him to go to his crate he about leaps down a flight of stairs and hurls himself into the crate and turns around and bounces while he waits for me to shut the door. When I have his attention he's frantic to do what I say but when something else has his attention it's like I'm not even there(we're working on this).
Since I got him at 4 weeks old from southern Ohio with fleas and worms I'm assuming he isn't a descendant of some distinguished GSD bloodline, so maybe one of his parents was the neurotic type.
I totally agree with you about testing for "wild" DNA. That's a rabbit hole I'd rather not jump down for ethical reasons and because he's doing so much better with socialization now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,485 Posts
My GSD is a rescue, so I can't show her in conformation, but she can compete in pretty much everything else GSD can compete in. Based on her build and coloring, it looks like she has West German show lines behind her.

Check out the Fenzi Dog Sports Academy. https://fenzidogsportsacademy.com They are an online school, and they offer lots of good, positive based classes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
627 Posts
Thanks on Molly, yes she is very fast and tricky!! The Schnauzers were different smartness wise, they learned fast and retained it, didn't have to tell them many times something, they were really pretty right after I groomed them but they loved to get dirty!! Molly is to smart, she thinks of ways to not do want you ask!! You can see the wheels turning when she looks at you, like... Hum what can I do now!!
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top