Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,420 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
My new dog, almost a month now a 3yr old GSD has had bad ear infections that went untreated or at least uncured for a long time.

I'm getting that well under control now, in fact it's probably cured completely, but I'm starting to suspect her hearing is damaged. I can't imagine she could hear out of one ear when I adopted her with as much nasty black crud that came out of it. Seems it would have blocked the ear canal. It's clear now though and vet said it looked ok, though he didn't put a scope down in her ear or anything.

She smart and learned sit, lay down, get up and shake hands in a the first few weeks. She doesn't respond to verbal commands well though.

I noticed today that she picks up hand signals and body language very well though.

For example I've used the command "gimme five" for shake hands. She doesn't respond at all unless I hold my hand out palm up though.

Same for sit, lay down and get up. She responds to the hand signal alone very well for all of them, and it's not even a very clear signal. I didn't intend it to be even consistent enough to learn. But if I use the verbal command without the hand signal she doesn't respond as well.

I may just be imagining this and she may just pick up the signals and body language well because she's never been trained, and isn't used to verbal commands at all.

But how would you go about testing how well a dog can hear and differentiate sounds? Any ideas?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,525 Posts
I would wait till he's laying down, but not asleep and call his name from the next room or out of sight. I'd probably do it very softly at first and increase in volume until he turned his head or had a response. You won't be able to tell how extensive the damage is, but you can tell if he can hear normally or not.

There are also tests that professionals can perform that will give you more data. Perhaps your vet has an idea. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,423 Posts
The only conclusive hearing test is the BAER. Electrodes are placed under the skin and brainwaves are measured.
Dogs learn hand signals/non-verbal cues 5x faster than verbal commands. The typical approach is to teach the hand signal first and then add the verbal command (the new command...in this case the verbal...always comes ahead of the old command/signal.)
When the dog is responding to the new command, you drop the old one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,997 Posts
It depends on the dog. I suspect my basset hound is half deaf, but I also suspect that he just ignores me when he finds it to be convenient.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,420 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
The only conclusive hearing test is the BAER. Electrodes are placed under the skin and brainwaves are measured.
Dogs learn hand signals/non-verbal cues 5x faster than verbal commands. The typical approach is to teach the hand signal first and then add the verbal command (the new command...in this case the verbal...always comes ahead of the old command/signal.)
When the dog is responding to the new command, you drop the old one.

Ahh, so there is actually a test. I may have the vet look in there and see if her eardrums and all look ok at least and be more observant.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,355 Posts
the BAER test can tell you yes/no the dog has hearing in this ear or that ear (that the ear is functioning or not) but it can't tell you to what degree it can hear...this you can tell doing the same thing as Four/Company suggested (but it may be that the dog is just ignoring you when you call her name:D)....if she gets treated everytime she responds to her name but doesn't respond at certain levels, i'd say it pretty sure that she doesn't hear at that level....(did you understand that?:rolleyes:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,966 Posts
One other way to test it is to have your dog sit and stay, then move behind her so she cannot see you. Clap your hands, whistle or squeak a toy, and see if she looks around at you. If she doesn't, I would get her to the vet for a BAER test.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,628 Posts
Ok, so this may not be quite the answer you're looking for but....
.....the way I used to test my children's hearing I would go into the kitchen and, as quietly as I could, unwrap a candy bar or piece of gum. They came running every time. :p Other times I could stand right next to them and tell them to do the dishes, or something, and they wouldn't hear a word I said. :rolleyes:

I do sort of the same thing with my dogs. Sometimes I can be sitting 5 feet from one them, with the nail clippers, call that one to me and get absolutely no response. So I go into the kitchen and open the fridge. Everyone comes running.

Dogs, just like kids, can have selective hearing. ;)

Jihad
and the pound puppy crew.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top