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How can we teach our puppy not to be a velcro dog?

He follows us from room to room, and if my wife and I are together, and one of us walks off, the dog hops up to follow whoever walks off. If the other restrains him to try and calm him, he just whines and whimpers.

Also, if we crate him, and we stay in the house and go in another room, he whines/barks/whimpers.

This also causes problems when we crate him for the day to go to work. We had a blanket over his crate, and instead of playing with his toys, he would do his best to pull the blanket through the holes in the crate and move around his mat rather than play with his toys.

Also, lately, he's been having soft stools, and his movements haven't been easily predicted. Earlier this week, he was going more predictably, going once when he woke up in the morning, once when I took him for his morning walk, then typically once when I came home for lunch to let him out to potty. Today, he went once when he woke up, didn't bother to go during his walk this morning, and pooped in his crate sometime between the time I crated him in the morning to when I got home from lunch. After eating lunch, we went on his afternoon walk, and again he didn't poo as normal. He pooped in his crate again sometime between him being crated this afternoon to when my wife got home from work. When my wife gets home, she feeds him dinner. When I got home, I took him out and he went pee and poop both. I'm not sure what to think / do. When we first got him, his stools were firm and consistent.. It slowly started going downhill to soft and inconsistent.

help!?
 

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Several questions. How old is he? What food is he eating? Have you spoken to a vet about it?

And why would you want to teach him not to be a velcro dog? I wouldn't know what to think if my dogs didn't follow me around. I say, let him be. He's being independent. He's doing what he wants to do and you're trying to stop him.

His bowel problem could be from a lot of things, but I would need to know more to make any suggestions. :)
 

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Several questions. How old is he? What food is he eating? Have you spoken to a vet about it?

And why would you want to teach him not to be a velcro dog? I wouldn't know what to think if my dogs didn't follow me around. I say, let him be. He's being independent. He's doing what he wants to do and you're trying to stop him.

His bowel problem could be from a lot of things, but I would need to know more to make any suggestions. :)
Sorry. Wife's going to make a vet appointment for later this week to talk about the stool problem, and we're thinking he may have food allergies too, as he's ALWAYS itching and biting his skin.

He's about 12 weeks old. Maybe a bit older. He and his brother were taken off the street and put in a foster home by a shelter, so we don't know his exact age.

Right now we have him on Nutro Ultra Puppy food. I know it's not the best, but once we talk to the vet about his loose stool, we can start switching him to some better food.

I don't mind him being a velcro dog. But I'm afraid he's developing separation anxiety. Like I said, if my wife and I are both in the room, and one of us walks out, he wants to jump up and follow. This isn't really behavior we want, as usually the one leaving the room is leaving the house. Now, if we weren't leaving the house, it's fine if he follows. He also whine's and barks and cries when we leave him in his crate and step out for awhile, or go to work. He also tries to pull in the blanket through his crate that we had covering it, and tear it up instead of chewing on his chewtoys that are in there. Will he outgrow this behavior?

I'm also having some housetraining issues. We watch him like a hawk, but he doesn't really go to the rear door like we show him when he needs to potty. We take him out constantly, but sometime's he'd rather eat the grass or dig his nose in the grass to find bugs rather than going potty. He pees pretty consistently, but his pooping is seemingly random. I assume it could just be connected to his loose stools at this point? Everytime he goes pee, I repeat "go potty jax, good boy" while he does his business, and "go poop jax, good boy" when he does his other business, and then praise him heavily each time he's done, and I've been doing it for about a week and a half now, but when I take him out and tell him to go potty, he just looks at me like I'm retarded.

Am I expecting too much from the puppy at his age? I just don't want to raise a dog that's not housetrained, and isn't friendly with people and kids. That's my fear. I'm reading all the books, etc.. But I'm still just scared I'm not doing things right.
 

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Here is a link to a cattle dog site. Cattle dogs are high energy herding dogs. They are extremely intelligent and become bored easily. There are a couple of members who have experience with cattle dogs. Lonewolfblue had one. I know that there are other members too that own the breed. My daughter has a blue heeler mix. She is very active and travels with Mel to different jobs. (Her field is orthinology) so she is in the field a lot which keeps Mel occupied.
http://www.cattledog.com/
Cattledogs/blue heelers need a job to be happy.
 

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As puppies grow they develop self-confidence and some independence but, when they're this age, they stay really close and being alone is quite scary.
On the housetraining one thing you might want to change is getting him to lead the way to the door...ie; you think he needs to go out....herd him AHEAD of you to the door...you don't lead him. IMO, that's one of the mistakes most people make....teaching the dog that if they need to go out.....you'll take them by the hand and lead them. They need to 'find that route on their own' without your lead.
 

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Wow, it sound like to me you are the same as any new parent. You're just worried that your doing something wrong and want to make sure your puppy turns out as best as he can. He is a very lucky puppy to have someone care this much about his well being.:)

As far as his independence most of that will change with time. He is only 12 weeks old; everything is still very new to him. But for right now he wants to follow you around for company and guidance. For some dogs that will never change. For other dogs they might like spending time alone even when you are home. But I know my dogs feel no point in being alone if they can hang out with someone else.;)

It doesn't sound like he has separation anxiety, he's just being a puppy. I would change the toys you are leaving in his crate. If you plan to be gone for a while buy a kong and feel it with peanut butter and freeze it. Put that in his crate and he will quickly be distracted when you walk out the door. Or you can just go the tough love method and he will eventually get the hint that he has to spend time in his crate every day.

But I would remove the chew toys regardless. Stuffed toys can be dangerous if left with a dog unattended. They dog could eat the toy and that can lead to bloat.

As far as the house training, I would give him a treat every time he eliminates outside. Also praise him like crazy. Act like going to the bathroom outside is the best possible thing he could do. He will soon start going to the door just for the opportunity of attention and a tasty treat.

Also, have you started a puppy kindergarten class? Those are a great chance to expose your dog to different dogs and people. They will generally be nice experiences for him too, because people in puppy classes generally aren't afraid of dogs. You should also take him with you to as many places as possible. Let him hear all sorts of different sounds and meat people and dogs of every type possible. The more he see's and experiences at this age the more well rounded you future dog will be.
 

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Yup, I previously had a Cattle Dog as well, not sure if you remember my Betty. She's now rehomed to a cattle ranch, as she was just too much to handle in town, and she was just getting too stressed in town. Some cattle dogs do well in a town setting, but others are more of the Working Cattle Dog, like Betty. She was meant for a ranch, and not a city setting.

As for Cattle Dogs, you really need a job for them to do, and really need to socialize them. Socialization is extremely important. They do become extremely protective of their home/person as well. So it's good to get them out with adults, kids, cats, other dogs, etc, lots. I tried hard to retrain Betty, as she was stressed all the time around most dogs. But she did well with Border Collies at one of her herding classes we took. So it's good to get them well socialized.

As for some of your other questions, with the blanket, I wouldn't put it over the crate. My Betty did the exact same thing, she would try to get the blanket inside the crate. If anything, get a crate cover, you can find them on Ebay, they work very well. I love the ones I got. As for getting over it, no, they won't. You would have to re-train that behavior. They won't just stop doing it when they get older, as they get stronger, and can damage the crate if they pull hard enough.

Another thing, EXERCISE. They need Exercise. Both physically and mentally. I worked with Betty on Rally Obedience, and she did extremely well. She learned Rally Novice in 3 months, and when we started, she barely knew Sit and Down. She also learned all the hand commands that go along with the verbal commands as well. She was a superfast learner, Nell and Chloe couldn't come close to learning as fast as she could. Once the pup is about 15-18 months old, you can then start up Agility. I think that would be an excellent job as well, or even flyball. But the important thing, depending on what you decide to do, is exercise both the body and the mind.

Also look into Clicker Training. It is another great way to exercise the mind. Betty was completely operant. She would offer many new behaviors just to try and get the click and treat. Something Chloe doesn't do, lol. She just sits and stares at you, lol. I don't want to go in depth on the clicker training, but if you have any questions on it, feel free to ask.

As for the tummy issues, I think it could very well be the food. I would recommend switching to something different, and just buy the smallest bag to see if it's any better. If you are feeding a food with chicken, try looking for something different, like one with lamb, or duck, or venison, or even fish. I think I'm running into the same thing with Sonny. I had them on the Eagle Pack Holistic Chicken and Rice, then changed over to the Lamb and Rice, as Chloe and Nell liked that as well, and does well on it. Well, not Sonny, he's turned runny, and has started itching lots. So I'm changing him back over to the Chicken and Rice, and as soon as the other girls eat up the Lamb, will go back to the Chicken and Rice for them. I also emailed them and asked them if I should still have him on the Puppy Formula, or just keep him on the Chicken and Rice. Waiting for their response on that. So if it is an allergy, the best thing to try is to try a different meat protien source to see if that cures the problem. Also, Eagle Pack has something called Solution that you can sprinkle on the food to help with these kinds of issues, as it adds probiotics to the food, and helps the digestive system. I started Sonny on that now tonight. I've used it with Betty and Nell when they had issues, and it took the runs away pretty quick. So whatever puppy food you choose, try changing the meat source and see how that works.

As for the following around, Betty was that way as well. She had to be wherever I was, which i was ok with. But she was already crate trained as well, so whenever I asked her to go to the crate, she did, and never whined. It will take some work, but try to make the crate the favorite place to be. Use lots of treats, and work with having the dog go into the crate with the door open. Don't close the door at first, just lots of rewards for just going in and coming out. Make a game out of it. Then try going in, either sit or lay down, then come back out. Anytime you walk by the crate, play the crate game and have him go in and come out, then praise heavily. It only took Betty 3 days to become crate trained, but I think she may have been trained before, as she was super fast with it. Then Nell and Chloe were both already trained, so I had no issues with them from the start. Now I'm working with Sonny on it, it's going very well.

Once you get the Sits and Downs done, then start on the Stays. This will be important when you are leaving, as you will be able to have him Stay when you leave. Start with small steps, having him Stay, walk a few steps away, then come back and praise. Slowly increase the distance. Once you are able to go out of view and he stays, then you return, start playing Hide and Seek. Go out of view with the dog at a Stay, go to another room, then say Come. Have him find you. This will be fun. And if you want to get really good, then use Wait instead of Stay. Use Stay only if you are going to return, and Wait for when you are going to issue another command while you are away from him. Once you are able to work with this, then it will be much easier on him when you actually leave the house. Sounds like he has minor separation anxiety, and not real bad. It's workable, and I find Hide and Seek as a great way to increase the dogs self confidence, and the SA will slowly disappear.

Now for his age, I wouldn't expect him to be perfect at 12 weeks. He's just a pup, and going to have accidents. You could be expecting a lot out of him, but I wouldn't be too hard on yourself if he's having some accidents. He's just a pup. He will be a quick learner I'm sure. Some of the others that have posted in here have come up with some good things as well. Lots of good advice here. Just take baby steps, and teach him everything one step at a time. He'll do well, I'm sure of it.

One other thing I want to comment on with the pee and poo, at 12 weeks, he may not be able to go long between potties. So if he's going in his crate, or in the house, take him out more often. I have to do this with Sonny, and I'm getting up almost every morning between 3-5am to let him out for potty, then back to bed for a couple more hours. Hopefully he'll be able to go through the whole night soon. But I've learned his schedule, and it needs to be often, or he goes inside. And he still goes inside the house, lol. But not in his crate, I've got that fixed now. That was one mountain I conquered, now it's the house, lol. But we are doing very well.

So, if you have any questions, feel free to ask. I know I covered a bit, and may have missed a few things in your posts, but it's getting late and I have to get up early to take the dogs out before going to work. Will be happy to answer any questions you have, and if you have anything specific to cattle dogs, feel free to ask them as well, I'll do my best to answer them as well. ;)
 

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Thanks for all the help.

Jax (my pup) can go through the night without peeing or pooping in his crate. I get to come home for lunch to let him out, but usually he's had to pee by then, and has to go in his crate. He also has a blanket (not stuffed) in his crate that he loves to scratch at and move around, rather than simply sleeping on it. He went poop this morning on our morning walk, so I'm hoping he doesn't poop in his crate while I'm out. I'm not thinking he will, since this is his 2nd poop of the day already (1st before bfreakfast, 2nd after breakfast).

Thanks for the tip on the crate covers on ebay, I'm looking at them now.

We do socialize him. We take him to my son's soccer (outdoor) games on the weekend, and also to the pet store when we go.

How should I work with him on the crate training? He has to go in the crate while we're gone to work each day (he's only in there for about 4 hours the first half of the day, and about 3 hours the second half), so should I work with him at night and on the weekends? Whenever I need him to go in his crate, I get a treat and tell him "go to bed" and walk him in there with the treat, but he doesn't like being in there. I spent a good day with him giving him treats and getting him to go in and come out. All the treats just gave him the runs and he threw up :(

Training him is kinda tough. He doesn't always respond to his name, and he semi-reliably will sit for me when i tell him "sit". Half the battle is getting him to acknowledge when I call him. He's easily distracted by other things. You know, like carpet, toys, any little thing on the floor, etc.. He's VERY VERY easily distracted.

I've tried teaching him down, but not getting very far with that one :(

I know they need exercise, I guess I'm not sure how to exercise him properly. I take him for a walk in the morning, typically I do about 3 laps in an area of my neighborhood, which equates to about 3/4 of a mile. Then in the afternoon I take him for 1 lap (all I have time for during my lunch), and then in the evening my wife will take him for a lap or two. What else can I do to physically tire him out? I try to play fetch, but when you throw a toy, he just runs over to it, lays down, and chews on it. IF you can get him to come back, he'll usually just bring himself and leave the toy. What can I do that's physically stimulating for him?

What about mental exercise? How can I go about this one?

Thanks for all your help!
 

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I'll just comment about the few things I sort of know about

I've tried teaching him down, but not getting very far with that one :(
What are you doing to teach him down? The way I taught my dog down was by putting him in a sit and then putting a piece of food by his nose, bringing the food down to the floor and out in front of him so he had to bend his head down and then stretch out, which made him lay down in order to get the food. He picked that one up real quick.

I try to play fetch, but when you throw a toy, he just runs over to it, lays down, and chews on it. IF you can get him to come back, he'll usually just bring himself and leave the toy.
my dog doesn't retreive very well so when i play "fetch" with him, we play with the chuck it. i throw the ball, he runs to go get it, chews on it a bit then I walk over there and he's usually still chewing on it so i have to take it from him and then i throw it the other direction and repeat. after about 5 mintues we get into a rythm and he'll run to get the ball and chew on it while he's waiting for me to get over there and then by the time i get over there he drops it and gets ready for me to throw it the other direction. That's what works for us in respects to fetch since he doesn't retrieve.


What about mental exercise? How can I go about this one?
For mental exercise with my dog i usually give one of his meals in a buster cube. It's this thing that he has to push around and flip over to get the food to come out. Also, we do hide and seek with his toys. I tell him sit,stay. then i go hide his toy, then I come back and say "where's monkey?" because we always play hide and seek with his monkey. short training sessions also provide mental stimulation. right now i'm trying to teach him how to push doors shut with his nose since he likes to open them with his nose, i figure he should learn to close them too. :)
 

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For the crate training, yes, in the evenings and weekends is fine. What are you using for treats? I use hot dogs. What I do is slice them down the long ways, roll it and slice it down the long ways again, then start slicing thin slices which turn out to be 4 small bits in each slice. The training treats should be really small, if he's given a lot of larger treats, then that would mess up his meals as well.

As for the distractions, just keep working with him, a little at a time. Even though you feel you aren't making any progress, he's just a pup right now, and every little bit helps. Betty was about a year and a half when I got her, so she was pretty much out of her puppy stage and was a fast learner. My Sonny is still in his pup stage, so I'm just taking it little bits at a time. He's like your pup when it comes to learning. It's just the pup in him, so don't let that get you down. Some have said to let the puppies be puppies and start training afterwards, but it's always best to start as early as possible. And make the training sessions really short as well, usually no more than 2-3 minutes. They tend to learn faster that way. Also, if you start a session and he does it perfect the first time, praise him and then stop the session and play. Don't try another time, as the next time may not be so perfect, as the dog remembers how he did it the last time. So you want him to think of the perfect session, and not one that's not so perfect, even if it means cutting your training session short.

But the main thing, he's still just a pup. He won't be perfect, and he's going to be more easily distracted. With my Sonny, I usually do 3 short sessions a day, and the rest is play. And once he starts getting out of his pup stage, his learning should be a bit faster.

As for the exercise, sounds like you are doing pretty well with the physical exercise, taking him out 3 times a day. I just took my Betty out twice, once in the morning and once in the evening. And would be play time at lunch, as I too come home for lunch, only 5 minutes from home. My morning walks were about an hour to an hour and a half, and then the evenings would be 2-4 hours. Then the weekends we would do long hikes around the loop trail here. It's about a 13 mile trek. Now that's more than what she really needed, but we did it for the fun. You wouldn't need to go that far. And being only 12 weeks, he's actually getting quite a bit of exercise, might have to up it a little when he gets to be about a year and a half, but for now, that's quite a bit.

As for mental exercises, clicker training. Get yourself a clicker, if you don't have one already, and give it a try. Start out by just clicking and treating (with very small treats) any behavior you like to see. If he sits, click as his butt touches the floor. Remember, the click is a marker for what you want to see more of, and your clicks won't be perfect at first, but don't worry about it. With some practice, your timing will get better. And the nice thing about this exercise, you aren't naming any behaviors. Just click different things, things like sitting, downs, left turns, right turns, turning the head to the left, turning the head to the right, paw touches, bows, and just about anything else. The more you do this, the more he will start offering new things on his own. After a few weeks of this, then start to only click certain behaviors and have him try to guess at what you are wanting. If you decide on a head turn to the left, don't click anything else, wait for that head turn. But don't go too long, if he's not getting it after about a minute, then just click something to keep him in the game, then try again. This can get really fun. Then if you want to up the ante again to test your memory, then only click each behavior one time and never again. If he sits, click and treat, but don't click any more sits. After you have clicked about 15 different things, it gets hard to remember what you clicked and what you didn't. It's a good exercise for you as well, lol. And in doing this, see how many behaviors he offers you. As the list gets longer and longer, it gets tougher and tougher to remember what you clicked and what you didn't, lol. This is a great way for mentally exercise him, and to help him become more operant, which is thinking things through on his own and not always having to be shown what you want him to do.

After he's offering you behaviors reliably, then you can start naming them. The trick is to name it before he does the behavior. If you are almost 100% sure he's going to Sit, say Sit and when he does, click and praise or treat, and say Good Sit. Do this a few times, and he will become more reliable when you give the command.

Other things that mentally stimulate him is games. Teach him things like rolling over, high-5, gimme-10, weaving between the legs, figure 8 around the legs, etc. Anything fun is stimulating. ;)
 

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Any more info on the clicker training? Do I do it in sessions, or just keep the clicker on me? Should I click if he's in his crate being quiet?

How can I play with the pup? Sounds like a stupid question, but it's been forever since I've owned a dog/puppy... I try to play with him, but he'd rather lay there and chew on something than get up and do something.
 

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Yes, you can keep the clicker on you if you want, but not necessary. I would do it in sessions of maybe 5-10 minutes, if you are just clicking behaviors for practice. You can also click and treat for being quiet in the crate as well. Anything positive is clickable.

As for play, it can be anything, tug of war, ball, frisbee, chase, etc. Even wrestling, just don't let it get out of hand. And if you are working on some heeling, you can run around the yard and click everytime he's at your side. This will get him to understand that next to you is where he's going to get his click and treat. Then eventually you can start mixing the click and treat with just praise, and slowly phase the click and treat out and just praise him.

With clicker training, if you don't want to end up using the clicker all the time, then it's good to phase it out, once the behavior becomes reliable. That's what I do with my dogs. I don't want to always have to dependin having the clicker and treats on me all the time. I find the clicker is the best way for me to initially train behaviors, as it's faster for me, and when they become reliable, then I phase it out and use just praise or praise and treats.

Now for the play, you can even click and treat any kind of play as well to get him started. Maybe he just doesn't understand what play is yet, like my Sonny. He knew how to play, but he didn't know how to play ball, he would just chase the other girls when they went after the ball. Then after a little one-on-one with him and the ball, now he steals the ball, shakes it in front of Nell to try and get her to chase him, turns and runs, lol. It took a couple days, but now he knows how to play ball, lol. Now to get him to play with the frisbee, lol.

Also to add, if you are teaching a particular behavior, keep the sessions down to 2-3 minutes max. But if you are just practicing clicking different behaviors, you can do it in 5-10 minute sessions, or even 15, as long as he's in the game. And stop before he gets tired of it, you don't want to do it til he's tired and then quit, as he'll get bored of it. By stopping before that, he will then be able to stay in the game longer and longer without getting bored of it. I usually do it in 15-20 minute sessions when I'm just doing it to have fun. Nell does things like weaves between the legs, figure 8's around the legs, and other behaviors as well. She's also got eye contact down. That's another thing you can click as well, eye contact. The more eye contact you get, the more he will start focusing on you.
 

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Hmm. Thanks for the info.

Is the clicker training typically faster than just praise and occasional treats? should i click and treat his going potty?

Definitely something I'll look into.
 

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With my dog clicker training has been faster because I'm able to mark exactly what it is that I want him to do where as with praise and ocassional treats (when learning something new) can't typically be timed exactly right so it might take your dog a little longer to figure out what it is that you want.

I haven't tried clicking and treating him going potty but I do tell him "go potty" and then say "YAY! GOOD BOY!" when he's done, then give him a treat. He's almost 3 1/2 so I'm not potty training him, but I am trying to get him to pee on command, we haven't gotten to pooping on command yet.

I'd assume you could click and treat for potty though, I don't see why not.
 

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Part of the trouble I have with playing ball with Jax, is that when I throw the ball, and he goes to get it, if you try to come get it from him -- especially when you're outside in the back yard -- he'll wait till you're almost there, and take off running with the ball.
 

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I only have a couple of things to contribute, since I have far less experience here than the other posters.

First, I brought home a 16 week old puppy a month a half ago. The first 2 - 3 weeks I was so frightened/overwhelmed/frustrated that I was actually losing sleep and not eating because I was convinced I was not doing a good job and was creating a terrible dog. Thing have gotten one million times better and now I miss my dog all day long and look forward to going home to be with her. What I realized is that this is a big change for her too and it takes a litle while for her to get adjusted to our family. Now after 5 weeks things are clicking very well, like we are on the same page.

Keep up the consistent work, even though it sucks sometimes. Consistency is terribly important (especially with an eating/potty schedule).

Second, how much room does he have in his crate? If he has too much room he can eliminate in one corner and avoid it the rest of the time he's in there. I kept our crate the 2/3 its size with a strong piece of cardboard that I attached to the inside of it until Deci hit a growth spurt a week ago.

Every dog's personality is different. I would suspect that in a few months you may miss it if your dog doesn't follow you around everywhere. I sure do. Deci used to not want to go ANYWHERE I wasn't. I let her out in the backyard but if I wasn't there, she'd sit there with this sad look on her face. Now she doesn't want to come inside at all :eek:
 

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Part of the trouble I have with playing ball with Jax, is that when I throw the ball, and he goes to get it, if you try to come get it from him -- especially when you're outside in the back yard -- he'll wait till you're almost there, and take off running with the ball.
That is where Stay will also come in handy. Or Come. You really want to work on his recall as well, to come when called. Another thing you can teach is either Drop or Out. Use it for releasing whatever he has in the mouth. Also, work on Leave It as well. Comes in handy if you drop something that could be dangerous to the dog, as in medication, asperin, etc, and if the dog tries to get it, you want a good Leave It so he doesn't pick it up and eat it.

For me, clicker training is also faster than just praise, because the click is more precise. That's also where timing comes in as well, the better you get at your timing, the better your chances are of the dog learning faster. As for going potty, I usually just use praise for that, but some do click and reward for going potty. You can go either way with that one.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I must say, Jax is really starting to show his intelligence, even at his young age. I barely even gave him treats, just mostly praise, and he's sitting upon command about 85% of the time. He's still learning his name, I think, so sometimes it's hard to get his attention. But when I do, and tell him to sit, he will most of the time, even outside with distractions. I do need to work a lot on his recall, and stay. He'll come sometimes when I call him, but not reliably yet.

I was also very proud of him tonight. My wife said when she got home, and eventually let him out of his crate, he ran straight to the back door and sat so she would let him out. Also, when I got home and ignored him for a bit (he gets excited. starting to calm down though), we went in the living room and played, and I watched him. He eventually got up and started walking around, so I got up and said "what do you need jax?" and he looked at me, then walked to the back door. Without his leash, I opened the door and watched him run out. He went straight out and went pee without me saying anything. I did tell him "go potty, good job!" while he was going, and praised him lavishly when he was done, and then we went back inside and played some more. He looked so happy playing, and I swear I could see a little doggy smile on him.

He's so cute I don't know what to do with him sometimes. He was even pretty good in his crate when we went out for dinner. He whined a bit, but when we came home, he was being quiet, and I went in the bedroom (where the crate is) and had to potty myself, came out of the bathroom, went to the kitchen, all the while he was quiet, and had even laid back down. When I finally went in to let him out, he didn't make a sound. I told him to sit while he was in his crate, and he did. I then opened the door and told him to come on, and after a minute, he finally came out.

The only thing I REALLY need to work with him on is the nipping... He'll still try to nip at faces and such when giving kisses.... Not really sure what to do with this one?

I think he's finally coming around though! He's even gained a couple pounds in the past week and a half we've had him.
 

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The only thing I REALLY need to work with him on is the nipping... He'll still try to nip at faces and such when giving kisses.... Not really sure what to do with this one?
I would like to know the answer to this one myself, lol... Sonny does it as well.....

Sounds like he's coming along nicely. You will be happy with his progress. Cattle dogs are quick learners, and learn best under positive training. They don't learn so fast if they are always being corrected with leash jerks, etc.
 
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