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Discussion Starter #1
So like all puppies, Summer does many things that she shouldn't be doing. She likes to chew on peoples clothing, picking up things that she shouldn't, trying to jump up onto the couch (fortunately she is too small to actually get up!), and so on.

I know how to stop her doing these things (eg replacing the item she is chewing with something appropriate, teaching her 'drop it', getting her to sit while she is trying to jump up onto the couch etc), but the effects are only temporary. For example, if I manage to get her to let go of the clothing in her mouth either by saying 'drop it' (which she listens to only half the time, I'm still working on it) or giving her something else to chew on, she will stop for about 5 seconds and then go back to tugging at the persons pant legs.

So how do I get her to stop for longer periods, and also to stop performing the particular behaviour in the long term?
 

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Sounds like your puppy needs some obedience training. Have you considered joining an obedience training class?

Other options include: using bitter spray to discourage chew or jumping on furniture, exercise with him to reduce his energy level
 

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How old is she? That has a lot to do with the length of time that she can do things. I agree with the classes. They will help.
 

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You are doing a great job of redirecting her, but try redirecting her with a chain of different commands or activities. So, if she is jumping up, and you ask for a "sit" so that she can't keep jumping, try going even further, and ask for several other commands. Maybe, after she sits, try "down", then "shake", then back to "sit", then maybe "shake" again. That way, the thought of jumping is even further from her mind. The longer you keep her mind off jumping, the less likely she is to go right back to that....

The thing about getting a dog to stop a behavior permanently, as opposed to just distracting or redirecting is......dogs often go back to the behaviors they enjoy doing when their owners aren't around. So, it's really do-able to get a dog to stop jumping on the sofa, or at least greatly reduce the probability, when you're there. But, when you're not, if they enjoy it, they will probably do it, because it's a "self-rewarding" behavior. Getting on the sofa is a reward (according to the dog) because they enjoy it, so when you aren't there to serve as an obstacle, they may still do it....
 

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Discussion Starter #5
She is only 11 weeks old.

She is already at puppy preschool, which is good for learning basics and all, but the advice that the trainer gives on the afore mentioned problems is pretty much the same as what you read in books and online.
 

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For the first year of your puppy's life you will be dealing with these, in fact, it's likely it will be the first TWO years. Just like other mammals they go through various stages of development before they are mature MENTALLY and physically. There is no "stopping a behaviour permanently" as all dog behaviours are normal, instinctive dog behaviours, what we do when we train them is modify the behaviours so the puppy and then adult dog is able to live safely and appropriately in human society. This modification does not remove the instinct to do these behaviours and that is why there really is no 100 percent training..you train and then you keep it up for the life of the dog (though it gets considerably easier as they age) so that you can be as close to 100 percent as is caninely possible. Adolescent (7-18 months) dogs are the most frequently surrendered dogs to shelters because people's expectations are unrealistic and do not take development and proper positive training and management seriously.

You will see at least two and possibly three distinct fear periods, at least two oral periods (puppy teething and then adolescent chewing) and many more interesting developments as the dog starts to reach adolescence and then social maturity. All the work is worth it, believe me. But understanding that none of these behaviours are quickly "fixed" and that right now your pup has the attention span and impulse control of a gnat is what will keep you patient and fair to dog that is learning at the rate that is appropriate for her.

At least two thirds of puppy training is management/prevention. Crates, leash/umbilical training, puppy proofing, using a zillion treats, distracting, ignoring and just basically being the thought police to PREVENT most of the behaviours so you can teach her others that are "better" will get you through. And then one day, people will start saying 'YOUR DOG IS SO WELL BEHAVED!" and you will look amazingly at your pup and go Yeah, she is! How did THAT happen?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the advice guys. I knew it wouldn't be easy, I just feel like I'm not making any progress and was wondering if there was anything else I could do and if I am on the right track.

I guess its just a matter of persistance and time.
 
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