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I have a female dog, cca 9 months old, mixed breed husky, german shephard and karst shephard.

It's a nice dog but really wild. We have a fence around her dog area, so she stays there most of the time. When you put her on a leash she will be pushing so hard, you can barely stop her. I lose all my breath and it even caused some injury in the hands from all that push and pulling.

Even bigger problem is that we invested in building the fence all around our BIG parcel but she still digs a hole under and escapes (EVERY DAY). If you call her at that time, when she's in "escaping mode", she will just look at you and run further. It looks like she's doing it on purpose. She does eventually come back but many times EVEN if you will try to get her, she will run away again.

So how that usually seems like:

After we set her free she's usually around us for 15 minutes or running around the house then she loses interest or idk what and escapes by digging the hole.

We're an old family and don't have so much money to invest. We've already had a big cost with the gates and the fence and it absolutely does nothing. She always finds her way out. We've gotten a dog to have some fun and someone to guard our house, but she's everywhere but home.

Our previous dog was always around our house and we didn't even have the fence. This one has a fence and still escapes.

What can we do?

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What a pretty dog!

This is the short answer to prevent running. You have to keep her on a line/leash/tie out chain. Once a dog has learned to escape and run, you will be hard pressed to teach her not to. That world out there is pretty fun and fascinating and for some dogs there is little at home that can compete with it. So they learn how to get out and run and every time they get out they are reinforced because it is so much fun.

The other issues (recall and pulling on leash) are training issues. Pulling to the degree you state is habitual and can also be self rewarding. The dog pulls you and you pull back and the dog pulls harder and you pull back even harder.. it's a vicious cycle. There are many methods to work with a dog that pulls. I like the person to quickly keep changing direction every time the fog gets ahead of you BEFORE the dog gets to the end of the leash and BEFORE pulling starts. The dog will hit the end of the leash.. bit you are already going a different way 180° away.. then as the dog passes, turn again.. this time 90.° Eventually the dog assumes you are crazy and should pay attention to see where you ard going next. The object of this exercise is to never let the fog pull the leash tight. YOU pull the leash tight every direction change.

For recall, I always ask, "Why should the fog come to you?" Because you said so is not an answer. From the Dog's Point of View, why should she come? Do you reward her with good food or play when she gets to you (every time)? Do you let her know coming to you is the best thing in the world, for her? How do you make coming to you the best choice she can make?

For this I would start by skipping the dog's previous meal. Put a line on her. Now recall her and when she gets to you, GREAT food and much happiness. That meal the dog skipped? She has to come to you to get it.. one or two pieces of food at a time. At first I would use better food than her meal. Cheese,deli meat, hog dogs... may make coming to you even more rewarding. She does need to be hungry. I would do this on a line or in the house.

Those ard my thoughts. Good luck.
 

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I agree with the other post, those tips are good and helpful. I want to also add this:
Your dog seems like she has extra energy and is bored. Exercise and mental stimulation should help you a lot.
Try taking her to a park, baseball field, or other open area on a long lead. Just let her roam around and smell. If it's a park or open trail, you can take a leisurely walk while she dashes about smelling things. This will tire her out physically because she'll be doing something like 4 or 5 times the walking that you do, and at a greater pace (because she'll be zig-zagging off to the side, in front, or behind you the whole time). it will also help tire her out mentally because of all the sniffing. In addition, if possible, play tug and/or fetch with her (both games can take a while to teach, but are worth it). Some other great ways to tire a dog out mentally (which is often more effective than tiring them out physically) are find-the-treats and trick training. Play find the treats by hiding treats around your house, and asking her to find them. Start with easy places, like out on the floor, and progress to harder hiding spots, like behind a door, under the couch, in a drawer, etc. Eventually, you may be able to try it in your yard as she becomes more skilled. Alternatively, you could try hiding a toy, if she's more toy-motivated. Play and trick training are especially useful, because they do a lot to strengthen the canine-handler bond, which improves behavior and obedience, as well as encouraging the dog to stay closer to you (as in, not escaping).

In addition to the tips above for leash training, you may try simply stopping when the dog reaches the end of the leash, or training a loose heel, where the dog walks to heel (with rewards intermittently, play or food) most of the time, but is allowed to go smell sometimes (smelling is an important part of dog walking). Other strategies sometimes include requiring a heel the whole time, but stopping between 4 and 10 times on the walk to let the dog smell. Different dogs and different handlers prefer different methods, so you may very well prefer the method in the other post- but these are a few other strategies.
For recall, (again, in addition to, not contradiction with, the other reply) make sure to throw a party when the dog comes back. Make sure she knows that was an excellent response. If she's super play-motivated, (from your description, she sounds high-energy, meaning she probably would love play) she may prefer a game of tug or other play, or just having a toy tossed to her, over receiving food. Mix up your rewards. Sometimes play, sometimes treats, (but always something at this early stage of training) and always praise. Even if she just got out, and ran away from you for 20 minutes, and has totally frustrated you, be happy when she comes, as if she was the best dog ever- if you sound a bit annoyed, she'll think she did something wrong by coming back. Be sure to practice recall a lot, and in easier situations (it's way harder for her to recall when she's out exploring than when she's in your yard or house).Remember that recall and staying on-property is a strange and difficult concept to a dog. They don't inherently understand human commands or rules, they have to be carefully and methodically taught- which may take a while. I definitely agree with the other reply- practice on a long line, and make it worth her while to come back to you.
 
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