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Our black lab puppy is 6 months old. He is doing very well in all of his training ect. I run a daycare business from my home and the kids are seperated all day from the puppy as my daycare is in a different area of our home. The only time he is present is when the kids have to go eat. The problem I am having is (and it has gotten better) but he will sneak in a jump up onto one of the kids chairs and quickly snatch something from their plate. He does not do this with us ever. We have trained him to go to his spot which is a rug in the kitchen and he just sits there, and he will stay until my attention is directed to something else he knows it and at least once a day will do this. I don't feel right putting him in his crate as I feel like he needs to learn not to do this. Does anyone have any suggestions on this? One other thing that he does is when I feed our other dog at the same time, he will try again if I'm not standing there to run over to our other dogs bowl. I feed them on opposite ends of the kitchen. I was hoping he would outgrow that by now but he hasn't.
 

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Crate him. He is only a baby at 6 months old.

The fact he does not do this with you is different than little kids. It is a LOT to expect of a 6 month old dog to do what you are asking him when it is just you. The fact he does speaks volumes for his temperament.

If you crate him or gate him out of the room while the kids are there you have won and he is not practicing a behavior you don't want and it is fair to both dog and kids.
 

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Every time he manages to snatch something he is getting rewarded for the behaviour. In order to break the habit that he has obviously gotten into you need to restrict him from having access to that reward. I.e. crate him, gate him, leash him away from the table, etc.

Labs are notorious for being food obsessed so you may never be able to fully train him out of this; however, you'll have better luck when he's a bit older and has better impulse control. In the mean time, work on a solid "leave it" command.

For feeding both dogs, feed them in separate rooms so they don't have access to each other's dishes. Lots of dogs simply won't tolerate another dog coming anywhere near their food while they're eating. Your puppy may be getting a free pass now, but that could wear off and you could end up with a dog fight. Best to let them both eat in peace.
 

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Work on impulse control games with him. You can find plenty of all levels of difficulty if you throw "puppy impulse control games" or just "dog impulse control games" into the google search bar. As well as videos on youtube demonstrating them. Also work on a leave it command, which will work better if you work on impulse control first.

For now, crate him or have a gate separating them. As mentioned above, every time he snatches something he is self rewarding. Keep him separated for a few weeks, and work on the impulse control games 2-3 times a day for 5ish minutes at a time. Then try reintroducing him, but only when you can keep an eye on him. Apply the leave it command and reward him any time he does anything other than focus on the food. Don't leave him on the mat and turn your back or attention away unless he is tethered to your hip or restrained/separated in some way. Every time he repeats the behavior, you're basically going to have to start over. Make staying on the mat WAY more rewarding - give him a chew, a kong, toss him a treat every 30 seconds, etc.

He is a young puppy - it's way too early to have expected him to 'grow out of' anything. He sounds like he is doing exceptionally well, to me. Puppies require training and management - well, all dogs do! But especially puppies. Putting in the time and effort now will pay off later.
 

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I agree with others, crate him. Every time he snatches food, he is self-rewarding and the problem is getting worse. Quite frankly, I don't think you're going to be able to spend as much time training him not to do this when you have to focus on the children in your care, so managing the situation and preventing him from doing this is the best option. Wait until he is a bit older so he has better control of himself. After repeatedly going to his crate whenever the children are eating and never being able to food snatch, it will help instill the habit of "no dogs at the table". Often, the first step to training a behavior is simply preventing the behavior you don't want.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Great thank you, I will definitley look up the impulse games. He knows the leave it command but with distractions it's been more difficult so we are still working to perfect that.
 
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