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Hi guys,
We have a 3 year old Pomsky - Charlie.
He is a lovely dog overall, but we do have a problem with him being aggressive sometimes...
He gets very aggressive when he is in possession of something and we are trying to get it back.
When I am trying to go to bed and he is there before me (always on my side of the bed!) he won’t let me move him, he gets angry and tries to bite :(
I am always stressed when we have guests - I don’t want him to hurt anyone.
When we go for a walk he attacks most of the dogs, like he doesn’t know how to play... it gets embarrassing...
Did anyone had a similar problem?
Someone told me that getting him neutered would help. Is that true?
Thank you in advance for any advices.

Regards,

Dee
 

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Talk to your vet but sometimes having a nervous dog neutered can make the situation worse much of this aggression could be coming from nerves if he's scared the bigger dogs might hurt him he will attack to keep them away and let's face it he is successful when he goes berserk you drag him in the other direction the other dog goes in the other direction he is scared away yet another foe....well this plan works why not keep doing it.

George barked at everybody who moved and every other dog but for a different reason George was kept in the garden before we got him and bark to get attention. So what we did was teaching the * look at me* luckily like most beagles he's motivated by food so, look at me George and then he got a treat we started off whilst the other dog or person was quite far away so he got lots of treats in the beginning ...gradually we reduced the distance and added less treats but he quickly learnt that if he didn't bark and he looked at me he got a treat , nowadays most of the time he will pass fight anything and he doesn't even bother. getting him used to people and other dogs you can use the 3D's that's distance duration distraction. gradually reduced the distance between you and the trigger gradually increase the duration he is exposed and use a distraction.

when it comes to George stealing things which he still does from time to time we simply exchange look George I've got something better than that old t-shirt, cleaning cloth, bit of wrapping paper...... he's quite willing to exchange these things for a small biscuit that means no growling no snatching no raised voices it's all done most friendly and very easily.
 

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Thank you so much Pandora!
Charlie sometimes will exchange whatever he is playing with for a treat, but sometimes he will hold on to the sock for a dear life and no treat will help.
I will talk to our vet, thank you! X
 

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Hi guys,
We have a 3 year old Pomsky - Charlie.
He is a lovely dog overall, but we do have a problem with him being aggressive sometimes...
He gets very aggressive when he is in possession of something and we are trying to get it back.
When he has something you want you need to trade for something of higher value. If he has a non food item usually you can trade for food, but not some piece of dog treat or kibble.. something GOOD like meat or cheese. Most dogs will drop what they have for cooked roast beef or chicken or a piece of hot dog.

When I am trying to go to bed and he is there before me (always on my side of the bed!) he won’t let me move him, he gets angry and tries to bite :(
No more sleeping on the bed. When you go to bed, he goes into a crate. Very simple solution to this problem. If he chews up the bed in the crate he sleeps on the floor of the crate. He does not need to sleep on the bed. You do.

I am always stressed when we have guests - I don’t want him to hurt anyone.
There is NEVER any reason to have your dog mingle with guests. Put the dog up. I have a breed (German Shepherd) that if they even accidentally bumps someone with a tooth can be accused of biting and I could lose my homeowner's policy. My solution? I kennel or crate the dogs or confine them AWAY from guests. I have friendly dogs but I will not risk them around people. Most people bend over a dog and want to pet the dog. Bending over the dog is threatening.. and most dogs do not adore being petted by strangers. Avoid all that and when guests come you put the dog up. If your dog is biting and growling or any of that he is trying to tell you he is UNCOMFORTABLE. Advocate for your dog and do not let your dog mingle with guests.

When we go for a walk he attacks most of the dogs, like he doesn’t know how to play... it gets embarrassing...
Did anyone had a similar problem?
No I do not have this problem. Why? I NEVER EVER EVER let my dog greet other dogs on leash. I do not go to dog parks. When I see another dog I get between my dog and the other dog. I do the same with people. If I have to be rude, so be it. NO I do not care if their dog is "friendly." Meeting on leash puts my dog in a defensive posture. NO I do not let you pet my dog. If they want a dog to pet they can get their own dog. Advocate for your dog. Get between your dog and the other dog or person. Step off the path.. have your dog focus on you and sit until they are past. Let your dog know you have his back. He has told you every way a dog can tell you he does not want to play with other dogs.. and, in fact, he is afraid of other dogs. Help him. Let him know you have his back and you won't let other dogs or people come near him out on walks.

Someone told me that getting him neutered would help. Is that true?
NO that is not true. Your dog is behaving the way he is because of you. You are not being clear. You are not teaching him that letting go of something will get him something better. You are treating him like a stuffed toy letting him sleep on the bed.. then you are upset when he thinks the bed is his. You bring strangers into your home and your dog tells you he is uncomfortable and you don't take him to a safe place. Instead you expect the dog to mingle and be happy.. and he is not. You take him out and walk him and let strange dogs come up to him. He tells you every way he can that he is scared and you don't take him out of the situation. ALL of this dog's behavior is due to how you are handling him. These behaviors are your fault not the dog's fault. Neutering the dog will change nothing.

Thank you in advance for any advices.

Regards,

Dee
You have a good day and good luck with your dog!
 

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I would recommend some training classes for you and the dog. Siberian breeds can be stubborn and headstrong. Our dogs are all our household dogs (I don't refer to them as family, but they live with us 24/7) and we still have situations that they are not allowed to participate. The dachsund and the Jack Russell are not allowed with strangers who they do not know. Both dogs have not proven to be reliable with people who do not know dog behavior. We constantly work on training, but some dogs are more stubborn than others. On the other hand, our pom is allowed to interact with even the most gregarious children as she has displayed over time that she doesn't have a mean bone in her body.
Interacting with other dogs can be a learned behavior. Our Jack Russell came to us with no puppy socialization and she had to learn how to greet and play with other dogs. We participated in many dog classes where she had a chance to interact in a controlled environment. Once she mastered some obedience then we continued to have playdates with other dogs we know, family and friends. Now at 6 yo, she still prefers humans, but she has no problem with proper dog interactions. But this process has taken years, not weeks or months.
Biting humans is not acceptable. We've had a few rescues with that behavior and it needs to stop. Again, classes would be good to teach you how to deal with issues. I would not give the dog treats or trade offs, as that can be perceived as being rewarded for a bad behavior and perpetuate the behavior. I have worked it out of our dogs by approaching with a slip leash (just something you can loop over their head, not clip to the collar) and confidence, lasso the dog, and then lead them to where I want them to go. Once they settle into the preferred location or behavior, then they receive a high-value treat or toy. Most dogs are more obedient on a leash than they are when loose, and you have more control of the situation.
I am a fan of neutering, but not for reasons of behavior. Neutering generally does not solve behavior problems. However, there is no reason not to neuter a dog unless you are a legitimate breeder.
Most of all, I recommend training classes, more for the human ;-)
 
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