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A friend of mine has two mixed dogs that he in turn got from another friend he used to be roommates with. Yeah, that's a sit-com. Anyway, they're both good dogs and have largely gotten along, but they're approaching 2 years old now and have recently started fighting. The last fight was pretty brutal, but neither dog came away with injuries, thank goodness. They're both around 50 lbs or so and very strong, but not human-aggressive. He's good with his dogs, and we just can't figure out why they're fighting. Good exercise, love and training - they get these things. I've read that sometimes certain dogs will develop a dislike of each other as they reach full maturity. I have no idea if this is junk or truthful, but the fighting has scared him, and now he won't let them outside to play unattended anymore, which is pretty difficult for human and dogs alike.

He's asked me about rehoming one of the dogs, to ensure their safety. I can't take either one of them, as my Hotel Dog is all filled up, and I know next to nothing about rehoming dogs, never having done this. Can anyone offer advice on how to properly rehome a dog, if you don't personally know anyone that can take him?
 

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If you give out your location, you might have a bit better luck finding a home on here!

The best suggestions I can give to you...

1.) Home Check
2.) Vet references
3.) Meeting with the dog, and their pets / family
 

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If you give out your location, you might have a bit better luck finding a home on here!
Bad idea.any attempts to sell or rehome a dog directly on this forum would result in disciplinary action.
 

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What kind of things do they fight over? Generally there is a common link, for Miko when we first got him it was space, he didn't like going through doors with Ava or have her go near the underside of the table or by his crate anything like that. So what we did was limit there interaction to being in the same room but not really interacting but the bear minimum. She sat on the couch with us if he was in the same room and he was on the floor. If Ava had to get up we made Miko stay on the couch. That way they still interacted a little but under complete supervision.

One day Miko acted like he was going to get on the couch and he ended up initiating play instead they have gotten along ever since lol. They are almost inseparable and will follow each other around when they don't have to. Are both dogs fixed? That may have something to do with it, something like territorial reasons?
 

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I would first of all look online and find an application that I liked. You can go to breeder's websites, rescue websites, etc and find all kinds of adoption applications.

You can even make your own!! I had to rehome a cat once, and I made up my own questionnaire.

Then, I would post on Craigslist, in the local newspaper, and by word of mouth to my friends. For anyone interested, I would make them fill out an application. I would gather applications for at least a couple of weeks, maybe a month, and then I would go through and pick the best applications.

Then, I would ask the person to meet me in a local park and make sure to bring all pets and kids and family members, and let them meet the dog on neutral ground. This is to make sure that everyone is on board (otherwise, they're not a good fit) and that the animals would get along.

Once you screen a few potential adopters, choose again the few that you really like, and request a home visit.

Visit each home and see which home you like the best. Make sure they meet your requirements; fenced in yard, no cats, not bordering a major high way, whatever.

Then, you narrow your search down for one, ask a $50.00 adoption fee and let the family pick up their new dog.
 

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Before I forget, you need to disclose the following:
* age
* breed/breed mix
* quirks (herding behaviors, ball obsession, etc)
* any human aggression and previous bite history
* previous medical issues, including any medication that the dog takes
* current diet
* current exercise/training requirements
* why the dog is being rehomed (and be completely honest)
* whether the dog has been around kids (not every dog is good with kids)
* whether the dog has been around cats (not every dog likes cats)
* grooming requirements including how much the dog sheds and whether it is an excessive drooler
* whether the dog is up to date on his/her vaccinations

Also, don't forget to the transfer of county tags, or AKC papers if applicable, and make sure your vet transfers all medical records to their vet.

You also need to tell the dog's new family that if for ANY reason they can no longer keep the dog that the dog can come back to you, no questions asked, free of charge at any time in the dog's life.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the input. I don't know the answers to all of these questions, but this gives some good feedback. I'll forward this on and ask him to sign up here for future questions. The amount of question/answer necessary is probably more than I'm willing to go 3rd-party on. Thanks again!
 
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