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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Actually cancer is the big problems for a dog, Obviously we should be taken a action for reducing cancer problems. But question is how to reduce cancer. I know some tips. such as Don’t let him get overweight, Feed him an anti-inflammatory diet, Reduce or eliminate his exposure to cancer causing toxins and Refuse unnecessary vaccinations. Again I want to say Main question is without these tips how much have effective tips for reducing cancer problems. If you know, You can share with me.
 

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If there was a formula to avoid cancer, we would probably all know it and cancer would be obsolete in our beloved pets. Unfortunately, there is no formula. While there are factors you can control, like the ones you listed, a lot of it is just genetics. You can take every "right" step to avoid cancer and still have your pet succumb to it.

In school we have learned that 50% of your health it your actions (how you take care of yourself) and 50% is out of your control. I'd assume this can be applied to dogs as well. So not only keep your pet at a lean weight, keep them physically fit as well. Choose a healthy diet with (IMO) as much fresh food as possible (do we consider eating processed foods healthy for ourselves? No..). I think those are probably the biggest factors, aside from obviously avoiding carcinogens.
 

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If you are talking about a specific dog, I have no suggestions. I had a 16yo dog that developed cancers in spite of following the conventional wisdom for avoiding cancer.

For general solutions, stick with breeders that try to breed for reduced cancer tendencies. This might help for some specific lines, but Golden Retrievers, Rottweilers, and other breeds seem to have a tendency to develop cancer. And to confuse the issue ... it may be due to breeding that did not try to reduce cancer.

Rottweilers are very old breeds, but they may have been bred for a certain look, rather than for improved health. Golden Retrievers were developed in the late 1800s to be robust family-oriented hunting dogs. Even 50 years ago, the lifespan for a Golden could be 17 years. I think that breeding for looks has resulted in degraded vigor and lifespan, b/c the average lifespan of a Golden is now closer to 12 years old, and a frequent cause of death is cancer.

Perhaps if breeders started working on lines with a long healthy life with reduced incidences of cancer ... it might help achieve your goal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you so much for giving this information. It was an amazing content with much more tips that work exactly. And I knew lots of thing about this subject, thanks a lot man.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Okay, Can you describe with me how to reduce cancer from a pregnant dog, And if you get a cancer into a pregnant dog, then what steps you accept? if you describe with me full details about this subject I'll so glad.
 

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Cancer is all too common in dogs, especially golden retrievers: 60 percent of them die of it, more than twice the average rate for all breeds.

Limit a dog’s exposure to secondhand smoke, pesticides and phenoxy herbicides, which have been linked to increased risks of some canine cancers. Keep dogs lean and fit to lower risk for cancer, as well as bone, joint and other health problems.

Be vigilant about health during the first four months. “Many vets recommend following the ‘slow-grow’ plan, which calls for golden puppies to weigh just 9.5 pounds at eight weeks and 30 pounds at 20 weeks.
 

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Okay, Can you describe with me how to reduce cancer from a pregnant dog, And if you get a cancer into a pregnant dog, then what steps you accept? if you describe with me full details about this subject I'll so glad.
Since treatment is really highly specific to the type of cancer, this is really something that should be discussed with a veterinary oncologist, and maybe a reproductive specialist.
 
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