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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I play ultimate frisbee every monday and I figured I would bring my dog one day to have her meet my frisbee buddies. Anyway, I tie to her a bench that is relatively close to the playing field and I'm easily in her sight, but she barks incessantly unless someone comes to play with her. Even when someone is there, she'll still bark for me but not as much.

My question is, how do I train my dog to not bark while I'm in a game and she's tied to a park bench? There are lots of people around so obviously, she wants attention but still the barking is so bad that I'd rather have her crated instead of bringing her to the park.

Any suggestions? I can't figure out a way of not making her bark. Like, I would come up to pet her, she would stop, I take like 5 steps back, bam, barking commences.
 

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Why do you take a dog to watch you play in a game that she can't play in? ... She wants to play with you. What is SHE getting out of being tied up and watching you play? I'd leave her at home. If you want to take HER out to play, that's one thing. But she doesn't get anything out of watching you play frisbee but frustration that she can't join.
 

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You could use that barking to your advantage in order to stop it all together...or at least be able to link a command to the opposite.

Of course this will take quite a few training sessions but its worth a try: First off you start by teaching your pooch the "Speak" command, which isn't too hard since you know exactly what triggers the barking. After you can get her to speak on cue (simply by saing "speak") you start working on the "Quiet" command. As she is barking briskly but clearly say "Quiet" and if she discontinues the barking then you praise and give a reward. Do this over and over again until you can get her quiet simply on cue.

I'm sure that other members will have some good advice on how to teach the quiet command also but until then try some quick fixes to mitigate the problem as much as possible such as: muzzle, leaving her with a kong filled with an enticing goody, and never giving into the barking because this just reinforces it teaching her that she'll get what she wants if she continues barking.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Why do you take a dog to watch you play in a game that she can't play in? ... She wants to play with you. What is SHE getting out of being tied up and watching you play? I'd leave her at home. If you want to take HER out to play, that's one thing. But she doesn't get anything out of watching you play frisbee but frustration that she can't join.
well, after the frisbee game, there's a big park where she can run and play in, but during the game, i don't want her to get trampled while we're in the game.

also, there are other people who bring their own dogs and they seem to just sit there peacefully and wait until after the game to run around and stuff.

You could use that barking to your advantage in order to stop it all together...or at least be able to link a command to the opposite.

Of course this will take quite a few training sessions but its worth a try: First off you start by teaching your pooch the "Speak" command, which isn't too hard since you know exactly what triggers the barking. After you can get her to speak on cue (simply by saing "speak") you start working on the "Quiet" command. As she is barking briskly but clearly say "Quiet" and if she discontinues the barking then you praise and give a reward. Do this over and over again until you can get her quiet simply on cue.

I'm sure that other members will have some good advice on how to teach the quiet command also but until then try some quick fixes to mitigate the problem as much as possible such as: muzzle, leaving her with a kong filled with an enticing goody, and never giving into the barking because this just reinforces it teaching her that she'll get what she wants if she continues barking.
loving ^ this advice, looking forward to hearing others ^^. i'll definitely try that one out.
 

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Then I would suggest taking her for a good workout before your game. Let her get her ya-yas out and be tired. Then a stuffed kong on a blanket would be a welcome rest. Maybe? :D

I'm just in the habit of thinking "What's in it for the dog"?
 

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I'm with FIC. Let the dog run and get out some of her energy before your game, then hand her a nice juicy raw bone and let her work on that while you play.

Is she dog-friendly? Perhaps she's enjoy being tied up with one of the other doggy spectators.
 
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