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We bring our puppy home on a Friday evening and well be with her full time for 10 days then we go back to work. When do we begin fake leaving out the room and eventually out the door? A few days after she is settled with us? how long for? Thanks.
 

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A new puppy - how exciting! What kind?

I would get her used to being w/out you from the beginning, starting with just a couple of minutes, then longer as time progresses. You can also get ready as if to leave every so often (purse, car keys, etc.), then sit down, so the dog doesn't start learning that cue. Don't make leaving a big deal. This will raise your pup's anxiety level. Patricia McConnell's book, I'll Be Home Soon, is a good reference book. Here's a link: http://www.patriciamcconnell.com/product/dog-separation-anxiety.

Are you crate training her? That will help with potty training, and also teach her that it's her safe "den". Start out having her sleep in her crate in your room, so give her a greater sense of security. Feed her in her crate, so that she learns that good things happen in there. Put her in her crate for naps (or when you can't keep your eyes on her, such as when you're making dinner, going to the bathroom yourself, etc.), so she gets used to it early, not just when you leave. You can start out with the crate door open, if you want, so she doesn't feel trapped, then work up to closing the door. My rescue, Maddie, sleeps in her crate (day and night) with the door open, b/c she loves it in there. Since I'm lazy, I have two crates; one in the living room and one in our bedroom. Make sure the crate is only big enough for her to turn around in and stand up in. Any bigger, and she'll use the other end to potty in, delaying house training. Most crates come with a movable divider; make sure you get this type, so it can be adjusted as she grows.
 

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Yes we are gonna crate train. I believe the breeder is doing this now as well. And the breeder definately leaves her alone too. I just wasn't sure if it would be too traumatizing for her to leave her home and come with us and then us fake leaving so soon. It would be a Shihtzu.





A new puppy - how exciting! What kind?

I would get her used to being w/out you from the beginning, starting with just a couple of minutes, then longer as time progresses. You can also get ready as if to leave every so often (purse, car keys, etc.), then sit down, so the dog doesn't start learning that cue. Don't make leaving a big deal. This will raise your pup's anxiety level. Patricia McConnell's book, I'll Be Home Soon, is a good reference book. Here's a link: http://www.patriciamcconnell.com/product/dog-separation-anxiety.

Are you crate training her? That will help with potty training, and also teach her that it's her safe "den". Start out having her sleep in her crate in your room, so give her a greater sense of security. Feed her in her crate, so that she learns that good things happen in there. Put her in her crate for naps (or when you can't keep your eyes on her, such as when you're making dinner, going to the bathroom yourself, etc.), so she gets used to it early, not just when you leave. You can start out with the crate door open, if you want, so she doesn't feel trapped, then work up to closing the door. My rescue, Maddie, sleeps in her crate (day and night) with the door open, b/c she loves it in there. Since I'm lazy, I have two crates; one in the living room and one in our bedroom. Make sure the crate is only big enough for her to turn around in and stand up in. Any bigger, and she'll use the other end to potty in, delaying house training. Most crates come with a movable divider; make sure you get this type, so it can be adjusted as she grows.
 

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I would say the first 2 days you should just be coming and going, not really leaving for long extended periods of time. Then as she's settling in and is more comfortable, you can start extending the times you leave, and make the cues of you leaving random so she can't associate keys with you leaving, for example. The key with this type of training is to ignore her 10 minutes before you leave, and 2-3 minutes when you come home. No reaction, no eye contact, petting. You want her to think that it's no big deal with you come and go.
 
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