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I'm currently attending college 3 hours away from home. The past two years, I've lived on campus, so I wasn't able to bring a pet. Next year, I'm living in a place that allows pets. I can't bring my cat, because one of my roommates is allergic, and the apartment requires him to be de-clawed, which I would never do.

I really love animals with fur, and my roommate is basically allergic to any pet I can think of that has fur except for dogs. I can't bring the family dog because she is in love with my mom and she's very submissive and pees everywhere. So I'd like to adopt a new dog from a shelter. I'm able to pay for it myself, and if there's a chance there's something I can't pay for, I would be in debt to my parents.

My mom loves dogs, she's OK with this. My dad isn't. He already thinks we have one dog too many. Even though I'm living away from home, I still need both of my parents' permission since it will be living in their house over the summer and during other breaks. I will be home in a little bit over a week. I already asked him for a dog once over the phone, and he said no. The next time I ask him should be in person. I'd also like to get the dog sooner rather than later, so I have the summer to train it and teach it that I'm it's master. I really only have one shot at asking my dad, I don't want to nag and bug him, so I have to say just the right things.

Your help is much appreciated!
 

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If he's anything like my Dad, I'd try to convince him that you know how much work having your own dog will be(especially since some shelter dogs tend to come with issues that require persistent training to remedy), and that you're ready for the responsibility. And let him know that the dog will be YOURS, you will give it all the exercise, training, and everything else the dog will need.

And already know, before going into this, what traits are important to you in the dog, that will show you're Dad that you're serious about this.

And just remember, a dog is a lifelong responsibility, don't just think about where you will be next year...think about the future. Will you get married? Have kids? Get a job where you can't properly excersize and train your dog evey day? What of you can't find good work and can't afford the dog? What about then? You need to know you're ready and have the money to keep the dog, and be confident that you'll be able to handle anything that comes with your dog in mine :) I was just throwing that out there because I know several people who were around your age when they got their dog, and wish they had considered the future more :)

Good luck! :)

~IJMB
 

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I would show your dad the savings you have for this dog, to pay for all the things it will need and an emergency vet fund so he knows you will be financially responsible for it.

I would also help your mom train the family dog. If your dad can see what a well trained, happy and fulfilled dog looks like it may help change his perspective on all dogs.
 

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I agree, you might want to wait. I am sure you know what you are getting into, but it's those weekend trips with friends, changes in living arrangements, changes in roommates, deciding to go backpacking around Europe, long hours in the library, all those things will be so much more complicated....I know it is "fun" to have a dog but I think college is a time to just learn,grow, play and later on you can get a dog. You also can't be sure you will get a perfect dog, and I can't imagine roommates on different schedules wanting to put up with a dog who barks, cries, or has accidents in the house while you are gone. Dogs are great but really complicate things and you have to be 100 % committed to it, and even then it would be a bummer if a great opportunity came up and you couldn't do it because you decided to have a dog in college. Whichever way you choose, I would say you also have to respect your parents, their house, their money, them puppy sitting.... maybe volunteer in a shelter to get your puppy fix, and then later on go for it! I couldn't imagine having a dog in college. I stay home all day with my pup and kids and it is still a whole lot to deal with, especially when you want to be mobile. good luck, whichever way you decide. (now as an example, while writing this short paragraph I have gotten up 7 times to take something away from my puppy, and told her to get off the table\counter about 15!! Imagine writing a paper with a crazy dog into everything!)
 

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I would wait. Having a puppy/training a dog while trying to go to school is really tough, I've gone through it, am still going through it, would wait if I could do a redo. I can't really study at school because I have to rush home to my pup. I've had to go home between classes to let her out to potty just to rush back to school. Having her has essentially doubled my bus travel time. When she couldn't hold it in for more than 2 hours, the sleep deprivation really messed with my grades. Also, you find out the hard way, you can't really rely on others to help you out when you need it. You don't want to be caught in a situation where there is no one who can and will do (x) for your dog. (So sorry, still really bitter about my boyfriend buying a puppy out of the blue and sticking me with all the responsibility, lol. He literally does nothing, just pays for her medical, and tries to ruining my training every chance he gets.) I have to stay up 2x later and wake up 2x earlier than the average student, and it's sometimes tough to balance all your stuff, the dogs stuff, school, then anything else (chores, relationships, family, eating... lol). She took/takes up so much time, it was/is really hard to stuff in everything. You just worry and worry, if every poop is ok, if she's eating enough, what the hell is this skin blemish, did she get enough socialization for the day, omg she threw up, the list goes on... I love Wicket to death, but I still wished I was finished school, or at least a year from finishing before we got her. Everything was so last minute that I just get upset thinking that things could of be so much more better, more structured and prepared. I'm sure you know a lot about dogs, and would have no problem raising a dog under optimum circumstances. But make sure your really think about it, and not just all the good things, but EVERY bad thing possible. Also if you have to fight your dad for this, do you really want to risk your relationship with you father just because you couldn't wait? Enjoy being a college student, enjoy your freedom, there is plenty of time for puppies in just a few years :) I know the moment I get a job and a house, it is going to be filled with dogs and critters.
 

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You're in college. You are dependent on your parents. You don't sound ready for a dog. It's a bigger commitment than marraige! It will last longer than a lot of marriages and you can't just divorce it. Wait a while.
 

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Thank you all for the advice. I already know I will have time for the dog, my major doesn't require a lot of time. I will rarely be away from home for more than three hours. My biggest concern is on Saturdays, I tend to be gone for 4 hours in the morning and about 5 at night, but I have time before, after, and in between to go home. I'm only a 15 minutes walk from campus. The thing about being busy on Saturdays is that I rarely go anywhere over the weekends. And if needed, I know a few people who are free at that time, that also have pets. And if really needed, I looked up a few kennels in the area, so if for some reason I really need it to be taken care of and I'm busy, I know there's a place to take care of it.

But usually most of the time, I'm at home. I have a lot of free time. Even with a job. I also wouldn't be getting a "puppy." It would be at least a year old or maybe a few years old. Although I know dogs can still be puppyish during that time, and since it will be from a shelter, it may have some issues which may cause more work for me.

What I probably will do is still ask my dad in a few weeks. If he says no, I won't say another word about it because I don't want to nag him. I will help take care of our family dog more and prove that I am responsible, but if he never brings up the topic again, I won't say anything until I have my own place and don't have to worry about bringing my dog home to my parents for a few months every year. Since I already have a dog, I'm aware of the time commitment and the responsibility. Our family dog is... interesting and unlike any dog I've ever met, so I'm aware that some dogs can have issues, if not all of them.
 

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If you're living on your own and paying your own rent, get a dog. You don't need your parents's permission. When you return for summer you return with your dog. That's just how it is when you have kids that have dogs staying with you for a couple of months. You can't not have the dog visit as well.

If you're dependent on your parents, forget it. There's no rush, wait until you're independent.
 

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Maybe see if you can do short term fostering for a rescue. That way if your life changes, the dog does have a place to go back to, and they usually help with vet bills. Or consider doing pet sitting for friends. You'll get a doggie fix plus some money.
 

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Maybe see if you can do short term fostering for a rescue. That way if your life changes, the dog does have a place to go back to, and they usually help with vet bills. Or consider doing pet sitting for friends. You'll get a doggie fix plus some money.
I think the above post from spotted nikes is a great idea! You can have your cake and eat it too this way. Plus you will have the experience of different breeds and mixes before you make your forever choice on your own pup/dog ... For a responsible owner a pup/dog is forever ... issues and all! :) And you will have plenty of time to save up on the vet fund you will need in the future.

Good luck in whatever you choose to do. :)
 

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Maybe see if you can do short term fostering for a rescue. That way if your life changes, the dog does have a place to go back to, and they usually help with vet bills. Or consider doing pet sitting for friends. You'll get a doggie fix plus some money.
Agreed. Life changes SOOOO much that last year of college and first year in the "real world"- you may have to move long distance for a job, move back home with the parents while job searching, finding a dog friendly affordable apartment in a new city can be tough, you might have long hours at work but no money for a dog walker etc.

Fostering is fun (also hard work), a great experience, affordable (most rescues provide everything except the dog food and optional things like toys and chewies), you can talk to the rescue and tell them you are not available over the summer so you don't have to worry about taking a dog home with you, you get experience with different breeds and personalities etc. You also make connections in the dog community who can later be a source of knowledge and help (dog sitting for example)

Also, rescues LOVE people who don't have any other dogs in the house. Most people who foster have a dog or two of their own but there is almost always a few dogs that need a temporary home with no other dogs and that is very hard to find. Sometimes it is due to dog aggression (which is NOT people aggression), but sometimes it is medical- like a dog that broke a leg and need 6 weeks of crate rest and has an external fixator can't safely be around another dog that might injure the leg- or a very shy dog etc.

If you aren't 100% financially independent of your parents AND expect to continue to be after graduation OR they are not 100% fully on-board, then don't adopt a dog now.
 

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I think the above post from spotted nikes is a great idea! You can have your cake and eat it too this way. Plus you will have the experience of different breeds and mixes before you make your forever choice on your own pup/dog ... For a responsible owner a pup/dog is forever ... issues and all! :) And you will have plenty of time to save up on the vet fund you will need in the future.

Good luck in whatever you choose to do. :)
TOTALLY AGREE !!! You get your dog and a trial run and a dog gets a 2nd chance at finding a forever home!!!
 

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I agree with the rescue idea. For someone motivated, time and responsibility may not be an issue. However, money is a big issue. A dog will cost you a minimum of $200/year in Vet bills, easily more than that if you don't anticipate issues. Food can cost $20 - $50 per month.
And, emergencies can cost $500 - $3000 per incident.
 

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I agree with waiting. When you're done with college, have a place of your own where you can have pets and are soley responsible for a dog, then get one.
 

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I really love animals with fur, and my roommate is basically allergic to any pet I can think of that has fur except for dogs.
Dog ownership is a lifetime commitment ..Perhaps right now would not be a good time to introduce a dog into your life..
Some petshops have other animals that may fit your lifestlye..like a hampster...
 

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First off, I will say that just because you're in college doesn't mean you can't make a lifetime commitment to an animal. I have two dogs and two cats and I still have a year left in college. I have no problem at all taking proper care of my pets and I have no intention of EVER giving them up. College students don't always have to be more interested in partying and traveling and stuff than their responsibilities. I'd much rather take a walk with my dogs than go to some stupid party.

Anyways, I still think that fostering would be a GREAT start! I really wish I could foster a dog right now but I am already at capacity (technically, beyond capacity with the two cats) of allowable pets so I can't. I really wish that I could, though. It would be such a rewarding experience and a great way to tell if you'd be able to handle a dog long term.
 

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First off, I will say that just because you're in college doesn't mean you can't make a lifetime commitment to an animal. .
I totally and respectfully disagree...
Concentrate on your education first . When you finally become financially sound...and have working skills in the labor force....That is when you get a dog.
 

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I totally and respectfully disagree...
Concentrate on your education first . When you finally become financially sound...and have working skills in the labor force....That is when you get a dog.
Ehh.. I don't think so. I got my first gal at 20 and now six years later I have five dogs. I graduated in 2010. You can be dedicated to more than one facet of life. I also have not lived with my parents in nearly 10 years.
 

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Hi... I'm nineteen, in college and I have a dog. I pay for all of her expenses... I could afford her vet expenses even, but my parents are nice and help out with that. I will move to a cheaper rental before I give up my dog... Or live on ramen for a few years... My dog is the second most important thing after my education and I will never give her up. I think I would call that a lifetime commitment. Like Daenerys, I really am not social... On my days off from work and school, if I have no homework I'm usually driving miles away to get to the only dog park near me... Two towns over. Or spending the day training or biking with my dog.
 
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