Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,842 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My baby boy must be growing up because he has "dog breath" now and not "puppy breath" anymore :( which got me wondering, how much dog breath is normal and when is it something to worry about? I looked in his mouth and all his teeth seem fine, I have a really sensitive nose and everything smells strong to me LOL, so I am looking for some advice and pointers on when something smells "off".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,186 Posts
Some. Which I know is really helpful, lol. It shouldn't be disgusting smelling- like rotting flesh or really fishy- and it shouldn't be overwhelming. You shouldn't be knocked back by it, but noticing it is fine.

Of course, if you're worried, you can always ask the vet next time you see them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,242 Posts
A dog with a healthy mouth shouldn't have bad breath. Maybe first yawn of the morning right in your face, it might smell stale. But in general, I think it should smell neutral. Not scentless... but neutral. Like the dog is breathing down your neck and you should notice the heat and the humidity of it above the smell of it.

I think dental hygiene is largely but not entirely genetic. With Soro, it is a constant battle to keep his teeth immaculate and it takes raw bones multiple times a week. If it falls down to two or fewer bones a week, it's not as if his teeth suddenly are caked but by the end of the week I can definitely be scraping some light tartar off his molars. And with even the slightest bit of build up, however harmless, I notice that there is a faint unpleasant smell. So even though his teeth might still be "clean" regardless if he chews multiple times a week or if it's fewer and I use my nails to scrape the tiny bit of build up off, the difference is noticeable.

But to answer your question directly, I think the 'healthy' and 'normal' vary from dog to dog. Though if a dog's breath REEKS then there is some tartar/gingivitis/other problem going on. Some dogs like mine have healthy teeth and gums but with a little less work might develop a tiny bit of stink. I think the baseline should be based solely on your own dog. But yes, when in doubt have a vet check it out. Not saying this is the case for you, but sometimes fractures, abscesses, or tiny lodged items are easy to miss in a dog's mouth.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,849 Posts
Hard to answer. We all perceive smells differently. I cannot smell roses, nor am I aware of garlic on people's breath. People will say, this smells so beautiful, or this stinks, and I smell nothing; on the other hand, heavy, sweet flower smells make me want to puke, and cheap perfume in an elevator is the elevator it gut-wrenching. I'm ulta-sensitive to other smells, like herbs, smoke, electrical malfunction, dog fart, carrion in the vacinity, etc.

Generally it takes some years for a dog to accumulate tatar/gingivitis etc. Based on age along, I'd guess the problem is one of perception. But given the subjective nature of smells, a vet's opinon would be worthwhile.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,145 Posts
A dog with a healthy mouth shouldn't have bad breath. Maybe first yawn of the morning right in your face, it might smell stale. But in general, I think it should smell neutral. Not scentless... but neutral. Like the dog is breathing down your neck and you should notice the heat and the humidity of it above the smell of it.
Agreed, a healthy mouth shouldn't really have a strong or noticeable odor (barring having just eaten or licked something gross).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,369 Posts
From a layman perspective, I think there can be two general issues:

1. If his mouth smells, then brush his teeth every day, or after every meal, and see if that helps.
2. He might also have an infection, an allergy, or a sinus infection that can cause a bad smell, which you may detect only occasionally. You'll have to ask the Vet about that. I think there can be a link between yeast infections in the ear and sinus infections?

I imagine there can be internal issues, such as diabetes, etc. that can result in smells, but I have no experience with those.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,842 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I cant give him raw bones, he has a sensitive constitution, but he does have lots of chews and does chew a lot. I looked into his mouth with a flashlight (it was remarkably good about it!) and I didnt see any broken teeth or anything stuck between them, and no its not a knock you down smell, its just a ... smell. But I did ask OH and he said that he didnt smell anything unusual on his breath, so it might be just me being sensitive LOL (I am VERY sensitive to smells, OH jokes that I am almost like a dog).
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top